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Thread: Garage Door Insulation Panels?

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
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    2,182
    I have to ask what fire codes say about flammable insulation exposed inside a garage? Even the isco foil covered panel require a drywall covering for fire resistance.
    Bill D.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Colorado
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    396
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    I have to ask what fire codes say about flammable insulation exposed inside a garage? Even the isco foil covered panel require a drywall covering for fire resistance.
    Bill D.
    I have also been researching insulation options for my steel garage doors.

    Fire safety has been a concern of mine too. What I have found is that polyisocyanurate (PolyIso) insulation has better resistance to fire spread than polystyrene. It also has better insulation value. However, most PolyIso products still require a drywall covering. I did find out that most all manufacturers of PolIso insulation make a version that is rated for exposed applications, but minimum orders for these products is over 2,000 units!

    I think I'm leaning toward using Dow's Tuff-R (PolyIso) with the foil side facing the garage interior. It's not my preference, but I don't see a better alternative.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    San Diego, Ca
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    1,074
    Sean,
    I think that you have a reasonable plan. Having foil facing the interior is probably better for fire protection and looks better anyways.

    I'd say go ahead. Your plan is a great improvement over what you have right now (nothing). Don't overthink it.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
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    170
    Completely non-scientific but the fire comments made me wonder just how flammable this stuff is, so I took this piece and tried setting it on fire with a long nose propane lighter.
    I got it to flicker flame once but it wouldn't sustain on its own.
    Not saying there's not a potential issue but if a fire does happen I don't see this acting as an accelerator compared to the wood and various chemicals that live in the garage too.

    And no I didn't try setting it on fire on my knee.

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  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
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    Sacramento, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Hinton View Post
    Completely non-scientific but the fire comments made me wonder just how flammable this stuff is, so I took this piece and tried setting it on fire with a long nose propane lighter.
    I got it to flicker flame once but it wouldn't sustain on its own.
    Not saying there's not a potential issue but if a fire does happen I don't see this acting as an accelerator compared to the wood and various chemicals that live in the garage too.

    And no I didn't try setting it on fire on my knee.

    image.jpg
    Yea I didnt think that stuff was very flammable if at all. Then I thought, boy that seems kinda funny worrying about flammable garage door insulation panels in a shop full of wood and saw dust!
    If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!

  6. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Hinton View Post
    It just so happens I put some insulation on my garage door yesterday and today.
    It was not especially difficult.
    I bought 4x8 panels and cut them on the tablesaw.
    I cleaned the door and used foam panel adhesive and some screws, got everything from Home Depot.
    if a kit had been available in the store I would have probably done that.
    Hopefully it will make a difference.
    I still need to blow insulation into the attic too.


    Attachment 387128Attachment 387129

    What I have heard of some people doing is buying the rigid foam insulation, preferably the pink stuff, then buying sheets of 1/8 inch luan plywood. Then you glue the plywood to the pink foam insulation. Once it dries, you use a table saw to cut pieces of the foam/plywood to fit the door. The idea is that the plywood won't damage as easily as the rigid foam would be damaged if you were hit to accidentally hit it with something like the lawnmower. Also, the plywood accepts paint to match the door paint or the room paint.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Verson View Post
    What I have heard of some people doing is buying the rigid foam insulation, preferably the pink stuff, then buying sheets of 1/8 inch luan plywood. Then you glue the plywood to the pink foam insulation. Once it dries, you use a table saw to cut pieces of the foam/plywood to fit the door. The idea is that the plywood won't damage as easily as the rigid foam would be damaged if you were hit to accidentally hit it with something like the lawnmower. Also, the plywood accepts paint to match the door paint or the room paint.
    With all that added weight though Im betting youll have to have the spring adjusted to compensate.
    If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!

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