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Thread: How to mitre cut 12/4 mahogany

  1. #1

    How to mitre cut 12/4 mahogany

    What saw or technique would you use to cut a mitre in 12/4 mahogany (measures 2 3/4”) finished? My 10” table saw at a 45 Can only get through 2.5”. I’ve tried hand sawing the remaining and using a router on a jig but have not found a perfect solution. I need clean cuts so the 45s come together cleanly at the joins.

    I promised my fiancé I’d build her a console table with waterfall edge and this cut has me stumped.
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  2. #2
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    I'd take a hand plane to it and keep checking for 45 degrees every few shavings.

  3. #3
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    I have a chop saw setup accurately and if need be, tune by hand with hand planes.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  4. #4
    Do as you did: cut the majority on the table saw. Then use a handsaw to cut the remainder, proud. Finally tune with a jack plane. Skew it so that the sole references the table sawn surface. You will be able to shoot the hand sawn portion perfectly this way.

  5. #5
    I would clean up the end with a 12 inch disc sander .
    She said “How many woodworking tools do you need?”
    I said “Why? Do you know someone who is selling some?”


  6. #6
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    John

    You can mount 12" blades on some 10" saws -- the blade can't be lowered completely below the table but that's not a problem if all you use it for is deep cuts. You might need to make a new throat plate and, of course, your crosscut/miter jig has to be dead on.
    Last edited by Frank Drew; 05-31-2018 at 9:59 AM.

  7. #7
    Thanks for the inputs! Right now I’m limited to router and a few entry level saws (table, jig, mitre). Anyone have luck using a router jig to do this?

  8. #8
    I would cut as deep as I could, then finish up with a Japanese handsaw.

  9. #9
    Maybe a file?

    I don't know how you could use a router without getting tear out trying to do this.

    BTDT -- trying to do a task with the wrong tools.....almost always ends up in frustration and maybe ruining a project.

    IMO the necessary tools to do this job well are a hand saw and a hand plane.

    A Japanese saw will be best choice here due to pull stroke as well as #4 handplane. Woodcraft carries some decent quality. I'm sure your fiancee will be impressed you spent a few bucks on tools to do a nice job for her. Another plus it will "prime the pump" for your future tool purchases LOL.

  10. #10
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    The hand plane is easy here, you have a big reference surface since you're working with 2-3/4" thick material. Just tune until the joints seat at 90. Be careful about going over the sides with a hand plane, it can be disastrous if they're not insanely sharp or if the wood has any runout at all. I much prefer to plane toward center, then take a stroke and knock the center down.

    With the sides already apart I can't see where a flush cut saw is going to do much good.

    Just an FYI but if you want continuous grain on the outside edge then you're going to have to put a new miter on the inside of the off cut. That way it breaks like a hinge, rather than being flipped around on the legs.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Holcombe View Post

    With the sides already apart I can't see where a flush cut saw is going to do much good.
    Hi Brian,
    Because there is a good reference surface, I could see using one of the flexible Japanese flush cut saws to remove the ledge that needs to be cleaned up. In fact, rather than sawing totally flush, I might put 2-3 pieces of masking tape on the side of the flush cut saw to leave a tiny bit of material to then take off with a sharp block plane. This allows the ability to sneak up on the final surface. A very flat sanding block with adhered sandpaper would work in lieu of the plane too.
    Your warning about breakout going over the sides is very valid.

  12. #12
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    Use a sled on the table saw....... and cut with the blade straight up..... and material angled at 45%.......

  13. #13
    Perhaps you couls sneak up on it with a circular hand saw.

  14. #14
    Join Date
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    If you’re anywhere near Dallas I could throw it up on my slider and be done in a couple minutes
    Steve Jenkins, McKinney, TX. 469 742-9694
    Always use the word "impossible" with extreme caution

  15. #15
    If you really don't think a hand plane is in your cards, you could cross cut it as deep as possible on the table saw, then flip it over and complete the cut upside down. I think you may have to do the second cut from the other side of the blade.

    You'd have to sneak up on the cut and make sure your set up is 100% perfect. Edit: Actually I suppose by cutting on the other side of the blade it’s going to be dead on.
    Last edited by Prashun Patel; 05-31-2018 at 10:06 PM.

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