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Thread: Small SCM slider repairs SI 16 SF

  1. #1

    Small SCM slider repairs SI 16 SF

    Ive done a few repairs this is next. Handle as it should be then folds to the machine into the recessed area. I havent used Helicoils before but maybe the are a direction. Had a tool and die maker that could have fixed this in his sleep but no longer has his shop. Did go to a local CNC guy for something a while back had it done twice and didnt go back as it was still not right.

    1.JPG

    area it threads into is stripped

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    Threads on the handle end are very rounded not sure if a die would crisp them up enough that it can be reused like to if I can

    6.JPG

    Also missing the nut which would allow you to lock it in place and direct where it pivots, likely done by a past owner to get more thread bite

    10.JPG

  2. #2

    SCM Small slider repairs, next one

    As it arrived the bearings on the slider were toast. Overall it still slid nicely, I can say that after having coming from two excalibur first generation sliders on a General cabinet saw.


    How it came saw not cleaned and maintained so even a build up you could feel on the bearing surfaces.

    1.JPG

    cleaned up the bearings surfaces and bit more, showing bearing number. Assume they are cheap bearings never mind someone was hammering on this one.

    2.JPG

    Cleaned up and sliding nicer now but I can still feel one or two bearings working

    3.JPG

    Are there upgrades for these bearings and is it worth it? They are not a high RPM bearing so that aspect insnt critical but if there is something better than it makes sense to do that.

  3. #3
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    It's just me, but now that you've gone to the trouble of removing the slider I would for sure put new bearings in. When I buy bearings there are almost always a wide range of options for a particular size. Chinese, Taiwan, Japan, US, Italian, etc. I replaced the bearings on a 12" SCMI jointer and the price range was something like $25-120 depending on country of manufacture and brand.

  4. #4
    I already put the slider back on to see the difference and there was. Its super simple to put it on and off .

  5. #5
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    I'd surly replace the bearings for like-new performance. If you can get one or more loose, it should be easy to directly measure them with calipers to get replacements that match. For the tilt-wheel handle, hopefully, you can clean up the threads (or re-bore and tap) to get that fixed up. You don't want the handle sloppy...it's hard enough to use as it is!

    BTW, I combined both threads...keeping everything in one thread makes for a nice story.
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 05-29-2018 at 3:14 PM.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #6
    Bearings will be replaced, the question is will better bearings make a difference as its not a shaper or a jointer but slow moving rolling table. No problem replacing them with any level just like to know from someone with experience if there is a difference for this application. My understanding of bearings is not to measure them but work from part numbers and cross reference. Ive done tapered interference fit roller bearing rebuild stuff in the past and all that was used was a part number to go from SKF or Timken or whatever.

    You cant rebore and tap its stripped. It needs a helicoil or some other type of repair, and I dont know if a die can bring the handle threads back to life be nice if that was the case and dont have to wait for a part to arrive. I have the same handle on my shaper not sure why you find them hard to use.

  7. #7
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    This is an application that standard sealed bearings are good. Do not use C3 clearance . For instance an SKF sealed bearing with JEM in the designation is a C3 clearance. c2 or CN are what I would use but nothing special or precision. Natchi quest or SKF explorer are slightly better bearings but C2 or CN is more important than brand. Dave

  8. #8
    thanks David thats the kind of info I was looking for. When I did the tapered bearings I talked to people that made tools for setting them up, I asked my friend that works on race cars and hist story was different. Timken invited me out sat with me and explained it saying my friend was correct.

    Next figure out the handle so anyone who has solved this before thoughts are welcome.

  9. #9
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    The handle looks like it has enough material for a Helicoil insert, if you can find the correct size. The threads on the pivot pin look like they are beyond saving. Chasing them with a die might move some of the metal, but I doubt it will be enough to last. However, the part looks easy enough for a machine shop to fabricate from bar stock.

  10. #10
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    When you start rehabbing old machines you need two friends. One who knows how to rewire motors, and another who is a machinist. It is amazing what they can make if they have something to copy. Dave

  11. #11
    havent had to rewire a motor so far and some are 60 years old, though now I dod remember having to replace wiring in one as SCM had a period they wired with self dissolving wiring, sort of mission Impossible style. Lucky I discovered that when I did as it was soon to be short time.

    Had an amazing tool and die maker friend trained in Germany several simple machines he make anything and super accurate. I had a spacer made by a CNC shop with tons of machinery wrong the first time had them do it over still off, clear message there. My friend lost his shop saddly he had a square head and its a round world. Otherwise it would be done tomorrow.

    If a die wont do it I wonder about getting a smaller die and so it becomes smaller a bit then the helicoil matches if there is enough thickness for a helicoil. Ive likely change threads on things in the past to do what I want. Not sure if it could be welded in then redrilled and tapped or if they make a helicoil that goes over a screw thread to make it larger in that case the base could be tapped larger but never seen such a beast
    Last edited by Warren Lake; 05-29-2018 at 6:16 PM.

  12. #12
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    The motor on my SCM SI16 is one of the few I've had to rewind. 9 hp windings in a 100 frame motor. I would check the motor bearings. The SCM motors run hotter and bearings do wear. I rehabbed my saw and bought a second for parts. I don't think I have what you need but will look. DaveDSCN3562.jpg

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warren Lake View Post
    I have the same handle on my shaper not sure why you find them hard to use.
    That should have been more "tongue in cheek", but I failed to convey that. But cranking my S315WS for tilt is not something I enjoy simply because just as soon as I get going at a nice clip, my hand moves enough for the handle to break position and partially fold. No big deal...it's an operator-error thing.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  14. #14
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    I would plug the stripped out hole and tap a new thread into the plug rather than do a helicoil repair. Helicoils are good where there is not a lot of movement but not in a situation like this. Drill the hole round to suit a piece of bar and push the bar in using loctite to make sure it does not move. You could make it more secure by getting a custom piece of rod made with a shoulder on it and push it into the wheel from the back.
    Chris

    Everything I like is either illegal, immoral or fattening

  15. #15
    thanks Jim I often read or type too quickly then off to something else.

    Lots of guys talk about power up and down stuff. Old school other than the power table on the stroke sander. The one I had before was brutal and made me mental any time I had to use it. The third one has a power table and its a joy, in the case of up and down all of my machines shaper and planers the SCM stuff are crank handles and fine, the older General stuff is more annoying. I dont mind handles when its a well made machine its not a bother at all, not much effort and smooth.

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