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Thread: Daybed I recently completed

  1. #1
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    Daybed I recently completed

    Here is a daybed I recently completed in Honduran mahogany. I plan to blog about it in a bit, once I get ahead of some of the work in front of me.
















    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  2. #2
    Brian,

    As always beautiful design and work. I love the attention to detail and the nice "surprises" on closer inspection.

    ken

  3. #3
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    Nice work Brian.
    Jim

  4. #4
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    Love the round top rails. The joinery on those rails are very well done...have you been studying those crazy cool Japanese joinery videos? Looking forward to the blog post.

  5. #5
    I love the subtle joinery on the round rails.

  6. #6
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    Thanks gents! That was my first time cutting out those round splicing joints. They're commonly seen on Ming Dynasty chairs and certainly in Japanese joinery work for connecting rounds together.

    I wanted to turn the rails and have only 46" of lathe bed available, so I turned them first, then I cut the joints. Interestingly it did not make it much more difficult.

    They're a superbly strong joint, especially so with the three notch type.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  7. #7
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    Very nice, the word crisp comes to mind.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  8. #8
    I particularly like the texturing detail on the end grain of the posts.
    Dave Anderson
    Chester Toolworks LLC
    Chester, NH

  9. #9
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    Beautiful craftsmanship and design Brian.
    The 2 side rails give a feeling of welcomeness, the allusion of the bed drawing you towards it to lay down.

  10. #10
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    Thanks fellas!

    Haha, I will have to use that in my ad copy Michael
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by ken hatch View Post
    Brian,

    As always beautiful design and work. I love the attention to detail and the nice "surprises" on closer inspection.

    ken
    +1. Me too...
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  12. #12
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    Bed looks great! I doubt IF I could make use of those fancy joints in the one I am making out of Pine.

    Maybe on the next project, I can use a bit better wood, and give those a try?

  13. #13
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    Thanks gents! Much appreciated.

    Certainly Steven, just want to use something with a tight grain structure.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  14. #14
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    Really nice work Brian! It's always a pleasure to see your work.

    What joinery did you employ to hold the rails on top of the saddles in the posts?

    And did you take any pictures of the layout on the round splicing joints?

  15. #15
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    Thanks Jeff! I figured the assembly as a big bridle joint so I simply glued the rail in place.

    I didn’t lay them out, I just planned the cutout as I made the cuts with the DRO on my Bridgeport mill. Once they were roughed in I used a gauge to mark out the prongs and cut those by hand. I use a cut engagement method of zeroing my DRO so there was some error of a few thousands here and there that needed to be reduced by hand with chisels.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

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