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Thread: Lifting a jointer

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Crystal Lake, IL
    Posts
    474
    Here's a 1800 lb. jointer being lifted the correct way, with straps and a shop hoist....

    Jeff

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Chagrin Falls, OH
    Posts
    4,528
    Jeff, I know you move big heavy stuff all the time (it seems), but any issues overloading the hoist? You state 1800 pounds but it appears the hoist in is the 1/2 ton (1000lb) position, assuming for more reach. I lifted my 1300lb-ish Oliver 399 like this because I needed the reach, but just curious.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Crystal Lake, IL
    Posts
    474
    On my hoist, I broke the plunger for the hydraulic jack. It was originally some cast iron POS from over seas. I replaced the mount and bracket with a steel one that I fabricated and TIG welded out of some scrap steel laying around the shop. I also made a heavier duty arm extension ( the black arm that slides inside the red arm) that is 1/4" thick box tubing. The original was less than 1/8" ( I'm certain it was metric, as this is an import lift that I bought on craigslist for $80.) I have had no problems since, and I even unloaded a 2700 lb. Northfield bandsaw using it in this setup, before I bought my current forklift.

    A couple of very cheap, and easy-to-perform modifications to beef it up, and it works great. I also have an even longer extension arm so I can load lighter items, like metal lathe chucks and the vertical head attachment for my mill, extending far enough out so the feet of the hoist aren't in the way, hitting the machine(s). I had the square tubing laying around in the shop for that. The items I lift with that long extension arm are all under 500 lbs., and are zero effort for the hoist, even extended an extra 3'. The hydraulic cylinder is rated at 8 tons.
    Jeff

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central WI
    Posts
    4,845
    Jeff, I'm glad you clarified. That would make a great thread here or on OWWM. I see people lifting way too much with standard cheap hoists. Your solutions are worth sharing. Dave

  5. #20
    I once looked at one for sale with a tig welder, bought the welder. Should have bought the lift, home made three times as strong maybe four as the usual ones. Weighed in like a woodworking machine and all was longer likely he could lift a Bridgeport with that. They are fine for some things, not good for tall machines had to turn the wide belt sideways. Wont lift the mortise machine too tall like the widebelt, load capacity decreases as they extend. Wont place a machine in the middle between the wheels on the car trailer but will get it onto the trailer, wont travel on a gravel driveway which I have. Ive also had to move some machines up and down over 60 inches and they cant do that.

    Ive picked up machines before where ive rolled a machine to a beam used a block and tackle then drove the car and 21 foot trailer in and lowered it down to the middle of the trailer. That was as easy as it could get but still a farm tractor at this end.

    Correct is what works for your application, safety first.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Crystal Lake, IL
    Posts
    474
    I use the hoist to get machines on the edge of the trailer. I use a pallet jack from there to move machines to a safe place on the trailer to secure, and back to the edge for removal once at location.

    David, I've posted a write up or two on the mods on OWWM. I'll snap some pics again if I can remember to.

    Jeff

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