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Thread: Urn in Cherry

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    SoCal
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    Urn in Cherry

    A quick, no frills urn done in a short time frame.

    Urn Cherry.jpg

    Normally I balk at requests with a sense of urgency but, given the occasion I did what I could in the time allowed.
    She said “How many woodworking tools do you need?”
    I said “Why? Do you know someone who is selling some?”


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
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    337
    Nicely done, Glenn. Love your joinery.
    Rustic? Well, no. That was not my intention!

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Beautiful, Glenn. This is something that is (unfortunately) on my list of coming projects and it's good to see examples like this for inspiration.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #4
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    For ideas, here is the same basic style with a bit more pizzazz.

    Jans Urn (4).jpg
    She said “How many woodworking tools do you need?”
    I said “Why? Do you know someone who is selling some?”


  5. #5
    Glenn,they are nice and provide an alternative to an urn. But I would describe it as chest, box,or casket and make sure buyer knows you can also supply urns. And if you get inquiry from someone baffled by choice you could point out that the urns are more prone to being knocked over ,broken , and bringing on trauma to the living.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Beautiful, Glenn. This is something that is (unfortunately) on my list of coming projects and it's good to see examples like this for inspiration.
    +1.
    Mine too, unfortunately.

    Glenn, could I trouble you for dimensions? I have no clue how to size one. Also, did you do anything special to the inside?

    Thank you.
    Fred
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frederick Skelly View Post
    +1.
    Mine too, unfortunately.

    Glenn, could I trouble you for dimensions? I have no clue how to size one. Also, did you do anything special to the inside?

    Thank you.
    Fred
    Rule of thumb is one cubic inch for every pound at one's healthy weight. That is, if I weigh 180 lbs in college, put on 60 lbs during middle age, then lose 30 lbs later in life, I am still looking at 180 cubic inches. The two shown are just under 250 cubic inches as the clients wanted to place some small objects in with the remains. Inside dimensions are 8-1/2" x 4-3/4" by 6-1/8". I wasn't trying to be super-specific, the 6-1/8" height just looked best to me.

    I finish them inside and out. More for wood stability than internal "looks" although it does make a nicer presentation if you are selling them or sending them off somewhere to be used. I glue the finger joints like I do any finger joints, spreading the glue on the "top" of each finger only.

    In California, if the remains are not placed in an urn at the crematory they are delivered in a sealed bag within some sort of container, often a cardboard box. I use silicone sealant when attaching the top. Even though the remains will be bagged I go ahead and seal the inside joints of the urn with silicone (a small bit on a gloved finger run tightly up each joint.

    If I am the one to place the remains I fill any leftover space with non-woven, polyester batting so the urn feels solid when moved. It is a little undignified to feel a loved ones remains flopping around or hear tokens of rememberence knocking into each other inside the urn. The bottom is then silicone sealed when screwed into place.
    She said “How many woodworking tools do you need?”
    I said “Why? Do you know someone who is selling some?”


  8. #8
    Thanks Glenn. I appreciate your help.
    Fred

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Thanks for that additional guidance on sealing and filling, Glenn. Much appreciated!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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