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Thread: Needle cases

  1. #1

    Needle cases

    A couple of Bodock needle cases made for Amish friends. Magnet in base keeps needles from spilling and helps to pick them up when you drop one.
    Triple E and beeswax finish.IMG_0738.jpg
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    "Time flys like an arrow........ Fruit flies like a bannana."

  2. #2
    Andy, I like your needle cases, would you have any pics of the magnet installed?
    Len

  3. #3
    I gave those two away already, but I have one more to make and will post picture then.

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Thanks for posting - those should be popular. I love turning osage orange. I'm interested in how you positioned and held the magnet too.

    JKJ

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    Wallan Victoria Australia
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    I have been making magnetised needle cases for a couple of years with great success and previously posted a photo in this forum. The kits are readily available here in Australia as "Secret Compartment Key Ring Kit". Place a 6mm x 3mm rare earth magnet in the base cap then half fill the cap with hot melt glue. This enables the user to tip out any needles/pins without them sticking and also makes it easy to pick up dropped items by pointing the base cap at the item.
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    My wife and I had words, but I didn't get to use mine.

  6. #6
    IMG_0745.JPGIMG_0747.JPGIMG_0741.JPG
    Here are pictures of another case made for Amish lady. Magnet is Super Glued to base (recess drilled) which keeps them from spilling and allows dropped needles to be retrieved. the base is cut short enough that needles can be reached easily, something I didn't do on the first batch.
    "Time flys like an arrow........ Fruit flies like a bannana."

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Fort Pierce, Florida
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    3,497
    Good project. I may have to make some for my needlepoint working sister-in-law.
    Retired - when every day is Saturday (unless it's Sunday).

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thom Sturgill View Post
    Good project. I may have to make some for my needlepoint working sister-in-law.
    The same little box makes a great toothpick holder. (No need for the magnet there. )

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
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    Neat idea with the magnets. That wood sure turns nice, huh.

  10. #10
    I love turning it, and the yellow color stands out. Someone gave this piece to me,but most folks hate cutting it.
    "Time flys like an arrow........ Fruit flies like a bannana."

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    E TN, near Knoxville
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    osage orange

    Quote Originally Posted by Andy Pogue View Post
    I love turning it, and the yellow color stands out. Someone gave this piece to me,but most folks hate cutting it.
    I don't see your location listed, but if you live nearby or drive through sometime stop in and I'll give you a few pieces. I cut up some osage orange blanks that size a few months ago, some more last week, and have a couple of logs out by the sawmill. (and still have some left on the shelf, cut and air drying since about 2006.) Osage makes the world's best garden stakes!

    I use it quite a bit for wands, too.
    osage_IMG_20140806_210754_2.jpg

    The bright yellow will normally fade fairly quickly, turning to brown - it helps to keep it out of the light, especially sunlight.

    If you like turning osage, black locust is very much like it except for the color. The harder the wood the easier I find it is to get a good surface right off the gouge. Persimmon is another good, hard domestic wood the cuts smooth as glass (related to ebony) - not as strongly ring porous as osage. Ever turn dogwood? - probably my favorite domestic wood.

    JKJ

  12. #12
    Id love to see it sometime, Im in Columbia, Tn and will call the next time we are headed up to the mountains!
    "Time flys like an arrow........ Fruit flies like a bannana."

  13. I have found that osage orange hates the skew, chips badly with a planing cut. Don't see that problem with a gouge. Or is this just my lack of skew adeptness?

  14. #14
    A neat item and something I can probably do. Thanks for posting.
    Mike Null

    St. Louis Laser, Inc.

    Trotec Speedy 300, 80 watt
    Woodworking shop CLTT and Laser Sublimation
    Evolis Card Printer
    CorelDraw X5

  15. #15
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Schoenleber View Post
    I have found that osage orange hates the skew, chips badly with a planing cut. Don't see that problem with a gouge. Or is this just my lack of skew adeptness?
    Bruce,

    I don't think it's your skew skills! I noticed the same thing years ago, splinters and chips when planing cylinders, tapers, curves. I tried different included angles, speeds, skew angles, razor sharp or otherwise, very thin spindles or larger. I did notice some specific osage orange seems worse than others - I got a good supply from one tree that seems particularly bad, another still chippy but not as bad.

    It's still a problem now after a lot more skew experience so I turn osage spindles with a spindle gouge, the 5/8" Thompson roughing gouge, or with a Hunter Hercules (more or less a gouge). Still, I think the wood is worth the extra effort!

    JKJ

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