Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 23456
Results 76 to 80 of 80

Thread: Martin OM Style Acoustic Guitar

  1. #76
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Punta Gorda, FL
    Posts
    2,530
    Quote Originally Posted by george wilson View Post
    At least I'm too far away for you to hit me!!!! ;0
    That's what you think!

    But seriously, what do you mean by "hollow edges"?
    “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness..." - Mark Twain

    Diapers and Politicians need to be changed often... Usually for the same reason.

  2. #77
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Williamsburg,Va.
    Posts
    12,383
    The places where the neck meet the sides of the body on your neck are convex. They,at the least need to be straight lines. Better yet,and I would not settle for less,they should be concave.

    I have never seen a guitar with convex surfaces where the neck meets the sides. It would be easy for you to fix the surfaces before you glue the neck on.

    Many Spanish makers glue their necks on while hey are still square all over. Then,they rasp and carve the proper shapers into the neck. That is doing it the HARD way ! It also makes it all too easy to cut the side and ruin the whole guitar.

  3. #78
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Punta Gorda, FL
    Posts
    2,530
    You mean like this?

    Where the bottom cap is a bit larger than immediately above it?
    “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness..." - Mark Twain

    Diapers and Politicians need to be changed often... Usually for the same reason.

  4. #79
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Williamsburg,Va.
    Posts
    12,383
    The neck is looking a lot better. That's quite a joint you have made for putting a neck on. I hope the attachment under the fingerboard stays stuck. Ebony is a little tricky to glue.

    If you do this again,find a position marker on the top surface of the fingerboard. Drill down into the underneath attachment. Then you can both screw and glue the attachment to the fingerboard,and it may never come loose. Replace the pearl dot after you are done screwing the screw down tight.

    I am a bit old fashioned,and the last guitar I made,and posted here,was the only removable neck I have ever made. I drilled a 1/2 " hole down through the heel of the neck. Then I drilled horizontally through the neck block with the neck in place. I used a larger drill than the screws for clearence. I had inserted a 1/2" brass rod down through the heel. Where the drill got deep enough to mark the brass rod,I drilled
    a smaller hole,and tapped it to receive the MACHINE screws that went into the brass. I put a washer under the head of the Allen head machine screws. The washers and heads of these screws were concealed inside larger holes I had drilled into the neck block. This guitar was VERY loud,and I think the extra mass of having the brass rod helped the sound to stay at the BRIDGE end,rather than having some leak into the neck,and up into the head stock. I always put a good size headstock on my guitars. This extra mass also helps reduce the vibrations of the strings leak into the neck and get wasted. Some guys put lead weights in the headstock and into the tailblock at the bottom of the guitar body. We want those strings to vibrate the bridge as much as possible.

    I might say as a caution that too much weight at each end of the guitar can make the sound become hard and even irritating(gets on my nerves). I've known guys to put 7 or 8 .45 caliber bullet noses in the headstock and tailblock. One classical guitar I played was very hard sounding.

    I had a very early Gretsch F hole hollow body electric. It had a "bridge" NAILED into place that ran under the pickups and under the bridge inside the
    guitar. Chet Atkins was always wanting Gretsch to make their guitars so they would sustain longer through the pickups and through to the amp. Hope that isn't too confusing. Well,that guitar was too hard sounding to suit me. When I made my 1958 model 6120 Chet Atkins mosel,I left that insidebridge out. Now I have nearly 20 guitars,many Gretsch. But the guitar I ALWAYS play has been the one I made. It is just right sounding.

    I made this guitar before Gretsch came back to life and started having guitars made in Japan. They are nice guitars,and the quality control is perfect compared to the originals. But,These new ones have a neck that is just too narrow for my big hands.

    Why did I make myself this copy ? Because they were wanting about $10,000.00 guitars for the old originals! My guitar has no label. inside it,and no serial number stamped on the back of their headstocks. The fingerboard is ebony rather than the rosewood of the originals. The scale length is greater,too. So collectors should never be fooled into taking my Gretsch as an original. I REFUSE to pay a fortune for an instrument just because it has a famous endorser's name in it. Needless to say,I could not afford to get into the price range of some of these old Chet Atkins models. Besides,the quality control of those old Gretsch guitars left a HUGE amount to be desired.I still have a 1964 Anniversary model with the top glued on 1/2" ++++ off center. There is a 4" square piece of crappy mahogany 1/8" plywood JAMMED under the bottom of the neck block in a half hearted attempt to make the neck block match the curve of the arched back!!!! Needless to say,IT DIDN"T MAKE IT !!!!!!
    Last edited by george wilson; 09-22-2018 at 10:15 PM.

  5. #80
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Williamsburg,Va.
    Posts
    12,383
    I just remembered that I haven't advised you about the ALL IMPORTANT issue of building in LOW HUMIDITY. 45 0r 50. You are likely in high humidity being in Florida.

    I can't tell you how many guitars I made had their tops crack when they were made in humid Summers. When Winter came,the humidity in heated houses can get as dry as the Saraha desert. That is no exaggeration,believe me.

    What they did in the 18th. C.,and on until humidity removing devices were invented was: 1. Build only in dry climates. 2. Build in the Winter. 3. warm the tops before gluing them on. The French,it is mentioned in Diderot,worked in a room with a large fireplace. They carefully measured the maximum width of harpsichord sound boards,them held them NEAR ( NOT RIGHT AGAINST !) the fire. I held the spinet soundboard we made in the movie against the fireplace and removed 1/16" from its greatest width. Then,while still warm,it was glued down. It hasn't cracked since 1974,when it was made.

    If you have already glued your top on,about the only thing you can do is keep the guitar in the case (A GOOD CASE),with a humidifier inside during the Winter. Fail to do this and you will be in for a lot of trouble. I wish I'd remembered to tell you this sooner.

    Gibson's fine models were made in Montana due to the dry climate. They had a miserable time trying to build in Nashville,in an un air conditioned factory.

    You must carefully measure across the lower bout of the top AND BACK,and remove close to 1/16" width before gluing it on. It would be the best policy to also do this BEFORE GLUING THE STRUTS ON. Especially the ones in the back,since they go straight across the grain.

    Don't get the top (especially) too hot as it can have the center seam open up if you get carried away.

    Even real old wood needs this treatment,as wood never stops swelling and shrinking over the seasons.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •