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Thread: Martin OM Style Acoustic Guitar

  1. #61
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    That's going to be a fine looking guitar, Julie. I'm betting it will sound very nice, too.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I'm betting it will sound very nice, too.
    That's one thing that has me most curious. And, of course, how will it play? The fixed bridge really changes things compared to all the adjustability you have with an electric bridge.
    “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness..." - Mark Twain

    Diapers and Politicians need to be changed often... Usually for the same reason.

  3. #63
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    It has really come together nicely. Beautiful instrument. I have a sense of how much thought you put into wood tones and combinations (remembering the kitchen build!), and your choices here work very well together. By the way, nice color match on the bridge. Look forward to the next update.

  4. #64
    Looks nice overall.

    About voicing/bracing, my understanding (from talking to different luthiers) is that the top is shaved until the tone is gone and the top is "neutral."
    At this point, the top won't have a noticable tap tone of "bong" but more of an empty "thud" as alluded to on the Cumpiano book.
    After the bracing is done, braces are carved to the desired tone.

    After the box is closed, final shaping can be done by sanding the top (particularly around the rims).

    As for purfling, I don't think it affects tone as much as the voicing, top, liners, side thicknesses, etc.
    However, I'm an arm-chair guitar builder...

  5. #65
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    Thank you, guys. I'm closing in on the finish but another project has taken precedent (orders from headquarters) so I'm not sure when I'll get back to the fine details of making the nut and setting the bridge.

    Not really having any experience with carving the heel of the neck, I sort of inched away at it and measured along the way.


    With a coat of shellac, sanded smooth, this is what I ended up with




    Grover tuners with exposed gears
    “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness..." - Mark Twain

    Diapers and Politicians need to be changed often... Usually for the same reason.

  6. #66
    This is just awesome! I really like the look of it. I can't wait to hear how it sounds. (We WILL get recordings, right? )

  7. #67
    Lovely looking neck!

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck Raudonis View Post
    I can't wait to hear how it sounds. (We WILL get recordings, right? )
    Only if I can record someone who knows how to actually play. 55 years after first picking up a guitar, I still only know three chords, the chords to Gloria... G-L-O-R-I-A. Oh wait! There's another cord I learned from my brother but I can't remember what it's called.
    “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness..." - Mark Twain

    Diapers and Politicians need to be changed often... Usually for the same reason.

  9. #69
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    Julie, you don't need to know a whole lot of "chords" to be able to enjoy the guitar. I'm a keyboard player, but have had some fun "just playing around" with my guitars. It's more of a feel thing as you get into it and you'll be surprised at what you start to hear.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #70
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    Jan 2009
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    Hi,Julie. I haven't been here for months,so just now saw your guitar making thread. You have been doing some nice work. Very fine craftsmanship. However,I am concerned that the ends of several of the top's struts are not inlet under the liner . Many years ago,Gibson made some low end guitars that were like that. They were problematic because the un end tucked struts would come loose.

    I always tuck the ends of all my struts,and have also been cutting little pieces of linen (not cotton as it rots!) I saturate these pieces with glue and fit them over the X that the 2 longest top struts have. I also fit the linen where the short struts are tucked under the long X braces. I make longer strips of linen about 3/8" wide,and glue them at the edges of the bridge plate on both sides. Half way on the plate and half way on the top. I also glue the linen down the center line where the halves of the top are glued together. I do this because over the years I have seen several guitars where the top seam has opened.

    Does all this "insurance" hurt the tone? No. The last guitar I made and posted pictures here was a real "cannon". That's what they call loud violins.I can apply it to guitars too.

    Having reinforced the weak areas of the strut ends,I can be assured that they will not come loose and buzz,or cause other trouble. BTW,I was appointed a factory authorized Gibson repair man back in the 60's.

  11. #71
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    Jim, I'll have to be honest with you. I really am bad! But every Thursday the Guitar Army meets at a park near us. My plan is to go there and get some feedback on the build and maybe get one of the old pros to play a tune. It would be very educational.

    George, so nice to see you back! I missed you!

    As for the struts, I'm sure I made a lot of other mistakes too. The more I learned along the way, the more I realized this needs to be more of a lesson than anything special. I'm not even going to lacquer it. Just rub on some shellac, play it until it breaks and build another.

    On the X braces, I didn't know what that material was (the linen you referred to) so I glued a sitka cap over the top of the X. Maybe that will fail but as I said, it doesn't matter. This was a learning experience. I do however always appreciate your input. You are the musical instrument guru here.

    Now all I have to do is find the courage to glue on the bridge. I don't know why I'm so hesitant to do that.
    “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness..." - Mark Twain

    Diapers and Politicians need to be changed often... Usually for the same reason.

  12. #72
    I stopped playing over 40 years ago working with musicians that were so good there was no point, it was easier to do live sound and record them. Now its a different world there are kids that are excellent players some still with some timing stuff but technically some of the old pros could never do what they can do. So many top players giving out great things they have worked out. If was going to learn again Tommy would be where id be looking for some more chords. Off the map self made talent, giant energy in person equals his playing ability, down to earth and a joy of a human being.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xm2ODiNUhac


    Last edited by Warren Lake; 09-05-2018 at 1:51 AM.

  13. #73
    I like this thread very much. Your guitar is coming along nicely. I admire the patience it must take to build all the jigs and such necessary to all the processes. You must have an awesome shop too. Great work.

  14. #74
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    Thank you, Lyle. I don't consider myself as a person with enormous patience. In fact there are times I feel like I have the patience of a 4 year old. More than anything, I believe all it takes is desire. The desire to learn, the desire to do and the desire to see it through.

    A few years ago I told myself I could never build an acoustic guitar. And I was right because that belief meant I was never going to even try. The moment I decided to give it a shot, the inability to build an acoustic ended. It was just a matter of desire to see it through.

    This guitar was built with all kinds of mistakes, so many I don't want to list them. But the fact there's resonance when I tap the box made this build a success. I have the woods to build a second learning guitar and one guitar with a master class bear claw soundboard. I've been told it takes 25 guitars before you really get it so, most likely, that pricey soundboard will be used long before I reach 25.
    “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness..." - Mark Twain

    Diapers and Politicians need to be changed often... Usually for the same reason.

  15. #75
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Williamsburg,Va.
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    Julie,I don't mean to aggravate you,but the heel of the neck should be a good deal slimmer,with hollow edges where it meets the body,rather than convex ones. Take a real good look at the heels of QUALITY guitars like Martins or Gibsons.

    I know you have the eye to perceive what I mean.

    At least I'm too far away for you to hit me!!!! ;0

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