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Thread: Clone for the L-N 60 1/2 block plane

  1. #1

    Clone for the L-N 60 1/2 block plane

    Hello Everybody,

    I just started working on an associate's degree in Mechanical Technology. I am taking CAD courses and machine tools courses, and the department is great about letting us work on small side projects. I would love to build a clone of the Lie-Nielsen 60 1/2 block plane. This plane is based on the old Stanley 60 1/2. I bought a broken Stanley for a few dollars so I could get an idea on dimensions and how the mechanics work. The problem is that I am not going to buy the L-N to see how that one goes together.

    Does anybody have both planes? How do they compare in size and shape. What are the main differences in the mechanics? Is the spinwheel the only major difference? I would love to get the dimensions on the spinwheel and on the brass locking screw in the front. Asking for side by side pictures is probably too much, but I would appreciate any help that people can give me.

    Block planes get used so much in wood working that I love the idea of making my own.

    Thank you for any help that you can provide.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dickinson, Texas
    Posts
    5,034
    I have a 60 1/2 Stanley as well as an apron plane.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
    Posts
    5,956
    Have two of these..
    twins.jpgtwin sides.jpg
    Made some shavings today, even..
    IMG_3915 (640x480).jpg

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    5,305
    Quote Originally Posted by Olin Stratton View Post
    Hello Everybody,

    I just started working on an associate's degree in Mechanical Technology. I am taking CAD courses and machine tools courses, and the department is great about letting us work on small side projects. I would love to build a clone of the Lie-Nielsen 60 1/2 block plane. This plane is based on the old Stanley 60 1/2. I bought a broken Stanley for a few dollars so I could get an idea on dimensions and how the mechanics work. The problem is that I am not going to buy the L-N to see how that one goes together.

    Does anybody have both planes? How do they compare in size and shape. What are the main differences in the mechanics? Is the spinwheel the only major difference? I would love to get the dimensions on the spinwheel and on the brass locking screw in the front. Asking for side by side pictures is probably too much, but I would appreciate any help that people can give me.

    Block planes get used so much in wood working that I love the idea of making my own.

    Thank you for any help that you can provide.
    Olin, I would suggest that you look at the features of many block planes, decide what you like, and design and build your own.

    I have many and none are perfect. Some are damn good.

    Here is a photo of Stanley and Lie Nielsen (from my file):



    I like the comfort of the LN in the hand best of all the block planes, however the blade adjuster wheel under the hand hold is difficult to get to, and you will curse each time once you realise this. The designs from Veritas is significantly better. The sides are cut away and there is space for even my fat fingers to get in ...








    The other weakness of the LN #60 1/2 is the front lever, the design of which is inherited from Stanley. When waxed it works well, but it can get stiff and make adjustments difficult at other times. The simple knob on the Veritas is much better.

    More discussion here: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ToolRev...lockPlane.html

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  5. #5
    As Derek points out, there are so many variations on the block plane. If you want to make something like similar to a #60-1/2 there is probably enough info on the web to get you close. I would consider a wooden block plane for making your own. If your goal is to 'replicate' a #60 1/2 I am not sure the effort would outweigh a little rust hunt effort. If you want to make tools instead of work wood, that is a different matter and the cost and effort become different factors.
    ...et's talks about your car. It's screaming "Wash me, please!"

  6. #6
    If the OP has access to CNC I would go for Bridge City Tools. A fine specimen to copy from???

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    17,160
    Howdy Olin and welcome to the Creek.

    The LN #60-1/2 is a nice plane. My only complaint is it weighs more than the Stanley models and is a bit harder for me to grip due to an old hand injury.

    The newer Stanley planes have less bedding for the blade. In some situations this can cause chatter or vibration. My understanding of such is the more solid bed under the blade the more dampening of vibrations.

    Good luck with your project and let us see the results if it comes to a finished plane.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  8. #8
    Thank you so much everyone. The pictures and advice are great. I am going to do a little on this project for every class I take. I am finishing my first CAD class, so I am in the process of drawing the 2D design. In Machine Tools I, I will turn the knobs. In the 3D modeling class I will 3D print the base in plastic. In Machine Tools II, I will mill the base out of metal. In my Materials Processing class I will make the blade and heat treat it.

    It will be a slow process, but it is always great to apply what you are learning in class to a project outside of class.

    Thanks again for the help.

    Olin Stratton

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Olin Stratton View Post
    Thank you so much everyone. The pictures and advice are great. I am going to do a little on this project for every class I take. I am finishing my first CAD class, so I am in the process of drawing the 2D design. In Machine Tools I, I will turn the knobs. In the 3D modeling class I will 3D print the base in plastic. In Machine Tools II, I will mill the base out of metal. In my Materials Processing class I will make the blade and heat treat it.

    It will be a slow process, but it is always great to apply what you are learning in class to a project outside of class.

    Thanks again for the help.

    Olin Stratton
    That sounds like a great way to mix love for hand tools with learning how to use machines and work metal. I'm doing something similar as I slowly acquire the machines and skills needed. Best of luck with your project!

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Olin Stratton View Post
    Thank you so much everyone. The pictures and advice are great. I am going to do a little on this project for every class I take. I am finishing my first CAD class, so I am in the process of drawing the 2D design. In Machine Tools I, I will turn the knobs. In the 3D modeling class I will 3D print the base in plastic. In Machine Tools II, I will mill the base out of metal. In my Materials Processing class I will make the blade and heat treat it.

    It will be a slow process, but it is always great to apply what you are learning in class to a project outside of class.

    Thanks again for the help.

    Olin Stratton
    That sounds like a great plan - and when you finish you'll have something really unique. My father was a machinist (before he went into farming) and during his training he made a machinist vise. I have that vise now, and although I don't use it much, it's very special to me because my father made it out of raw metal.

    Of course, that was way before CNC

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  11. #11
    Olin,

    please consider that many parts of these block planes are castings. They are not machined out of billet... These castings are then fixtured using specially designed production fixtures for subsequent machining and grinding operations.

    As such - you will find many parts making up the current design don't make sense if milling out of billet and will need to be heavily modified so they can be efficiently machined out of bar stock or billet....

    I will suggest that you make as many of small the parts - especially the blade - designed for the original design parts to interchange into your unit as possible. This will allow you to swap parts in if you need to....

    I think I would first draft up the design and then review it with your instructor with a very critical eye out for "design for manufacturability"....

    So for example - look closely at the lever cap and think about how you would machine all those hollowed sections with interior and exterior compound curves and complex shapes... These are ridiculously easy to hand carve an inside and outside casting pattern for makingn a mold... Very difficult to work out all the different cutting tool paths on to get the same thing out of a machining center.....

    The other option would be to figure out how to make patterns off the original (factoring in the appropriate shrink rates and allowances for machining) and then cast them... In this case - you have the massive advantage that the part was already designed for casting - and the design has been worked out for proper casting mold flow, gate locations, fillets, etc....

    Quote Originally Posted by Olin Stratton View Post
    Hello Everybody,

    I just started working on an associate's degree in Mechanical Technology. I am taking CAD courses and machine tools courses, and the department is great about letting us work on small side projects. I would love to build a clone of the Lie-Nielsen 60 1/2 block plane. This plane is based on the old Stanley 60 1/2. I bought a broken Stanley for a few dollars so I could get an idea on dimensions and how the mechanics work. The problem is that I am not going to buy the L-N to see how that one goes together.

    Does anybody have both planes? How do they compare in size and shape. What are the main differences in the mechanics? Is the spinwheel the only major difference? I would love to get the dimensions on the spinwheel and on the brass locking screw in the front. Asking for side by side pictures is probably too much, but I would appreciate any help that people can give me.

    Block planes get used so much in wood working that I love the idea of making my own.

    Thank you for any help that you can provide.
    Last edited by John C Cox; 04-17-2018 at 6:48 PM.

  12. #12
    Hey Derek,

    What's your favorite block plane right now? I thought it was a LN 103?

  13. #13
    By the way, Derek...have you tried the Mujingfang HK trim palm planes?
    Those are some of my favorites!

    It's like an HNT Gordon version of a block plane.
    In my limited experience, they work great for adjusting Japanese dai...or at least better than my refurbed e-bay special dai adjusting kanna.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    5,305
    Hi Matt

    I have owned and used the Mujingfang mini smoother for about 20 years (the one below in Ebony). About 5 years ago a friend gave me a HNT Gordon Palm Smoother (below). They are exactly the same size, both are bedded at 60 degrees, both have 1/8" thick blades, and both work exceptionally well. The HNT Gordon is better made and finished, but other than that their performance is the same.



    The Mujingfang is an exceptional bargain!

    I used a HSS Mufingfang blade (available from Lee Valley) to make this 40 degree BD block plane (Krenov style) ...



    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Olin Stratton View Post
    Hello Everybody,

    I just started working on an associate's degree in Mechanical Technology. I am taking CAD courses and machine tools courses, and the department is great about letting us work on small side projects. I would love to build a clone of the Lie-Nielsen 60 1/2 block plane. This plane is based on the old Stanley 60 1/2. I bought a broken Stanley for a few dollars so I could get an idea on dimensions and how the mechanics work. The problem is that I am not going to buy the L-N to see how that one goes together.

    Does anybody have both planes? How do they compare in size and shape. What are the main differences in the mechanics? Is the spinwheel the only major difference? I would love to get the dimensions on the spinwheel and on the brass locking screw in the front. Asking for side by side pictures is probably too much, but I would appreciate any help that people can give me.

    Block planes get used so much in wood working that I love the idea of making my own.

    Thank you for any help that you can provide.
    Olin, not to be a smart ass...but you do realize that a Lie Nielson 60 1/2 is a clone of a Stanley 60 1/2 right?
    If you're going to make a copy....why not aim a lot higher?

    I'd recommend looking at Holtey or Marcou.
    If you want to do a super block plane...why not this one: http://www.holteyplanes.com/infill-planes-A28.html ?

    I'd recommend not stressing on the adjuster. It'll add extra complexity for very little benefit.
    Once you get used to using a light hammer tap to adjust the blade, you'll appreciate the superior interface between blade and plane.

    Also, if you ever get tired of it...it would resell for good money.

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