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Thread: How would one ask for a raise?

  1. #46
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    Thanks, Jim. I'm hoping this goes well. I'm under enough stress as it is, not looking to add to it. I'm just gonna be straightforward with him and hope for the best I guess.
    Epilog Fusion M2 40 Watt CO2 Laser

  2. #47
    Chase, a dollar might well be out of date,but the oratory is not. I was around when raises could be pretty low. The unasked for increases could be 10 cents!

  3. #48
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    Man, I don't even know what's reasonable to ask. I don't wanna low ball myself, but I don't want to ask for an outrageous amount either.
    Epilog Fusion M2 40 Watt CO2 Laser

  4. #49
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    Take a few minutes and listen to this Mike Rowe piece; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CVEuPmVAb8o

  5. #50
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    Dirty Jobs guy right? I'll email myself that link and carplay it. Thanks
    Epilog Fusion M2 40 Watt CO2 Laser

  6. #51
    Todd gave particularly good advice.

    The supervisor being new is absolutely not a reason to bypass him.
    If you do it will be a long term mistake that cannot be undone.

    You are simply having your one year review, it may be stressing you out but it ain't that big of a deal to the bosses.
    They have been there, done that, many times over.

    If any merit increase is offered and it does not meet your expectations, or if none is offered I would suggest expressing thanks for the review and asking what you need to do to get to the $$ figure you desire.

  7. #52
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    Documentation is paramount

    Quote Originally Posted by Chase Mueller View Post
    ...How would you ask for a raise? I like to plan things out, which is why I'm inquiring about this now....
    I worked for a large scientific/technical facility for 30 years before I retired. I never once asked for a raise but I sometimes got raises and awards and promotions when others around me did not.

    #1, Excellence should be obvious but you have to toot your own horn - no one is going to do it for you.
    #2, Documentation is necessary.

    The nature of my work was interacting with professionals and providing professional services. I almost always worked independently and only showed up for meetings so my boss/supervisor/director didn't know where I was or what I was doing most of the time.

    This is how I handled things; some of it may not be appropriate depending on your job and position: Every time I completed a major project I sent a note asking the "client" to send a note of feedback to me and to my supervisor with what I did for them and how it helped them (if it did!). I told them I wanted this both for my annual evaluation file and for my personal growth. Not once did someone fail to provide positive feedback. I kept all of these in a file.

    In a separate file I also documented each project, both large and small, with the name(s) of the contact person(s), what I did, and the approximate time it took.

    Before review time I wrote a document highlighting the major projects and listing the smaller projects. No sugar coating, just the facts. I included the feedback from the scientists, project managers, and upper managers. A separate section gave my goals for improvement and enhancement for the coming year(s). I made a printed copy and a digital copy to email.

    I gave all this to my supervisor before the evaluation discussion. I never once had to "ask" for a raise since my achievements provided justification. If you do feel the need to ask for a raise, positive documentation will not only back you up but give the supervisor ammunition to pass up the chain. Sometimes they only have so much "raise" money to go around and they have to decide to whom to give what.

    If you have not documented during the year, it's not too late to write down everything you can remember and contact those you've interacted with and ask for feedback, even if they no long work for your company. If you can't reach them, write down what you remember of what they said. If you can't remember everything look at the calendar, ask co-workers, review emails and texts and recreate as much as possible. Write up what you can and make it look almost like a resume for the past year's work. If you do look for another job at some point this documentation will be valuable.

    (I didn't read the other posts so sorry if this was all covered.)

    JKJ

  8. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chase Mueller View Post
    I'd like to get some input from personal first-hand experiences when asking for a raise. I feel come July, I will be due for a raise, as it will mark one year at my job. Having spoken to my boss a few months ago about my future at the company and what not, he said we'd talk at my year mark. I have no clue how to ask for a raise. I want to be professional about this. I feel I've made a consistent improvement at work since I started. I'm beyond punctual, arriving early every day, but only clocking in when permitted. Never had to be told to get to work. I always take responsibility for something if it goes wrong, which rarely/never happens. I help others when I can, and I've taken on more and more responsibilities willingly. How would you ask for a raise? I like to plan things out, which is why I'm inquiring about this now. Thanks in advance for anyone who contributes to this thread!
    one thing that is working in your favor is the quality of effort and effort you put into the job. Your boss may already recognize this and may be thinking about a raise for you. But ever happens always know your options and that a replacement could be found easily to fill your shoes. This is the problem sometimes.

  9. #54
    Chase, as others have stated, you need to be prepared for the discussion with your boss, it may come sooner that you expect so don't delay.

    You need to go in with a listing of your accomplishments and contributions to the company in writing, including what you stated in your first post: " I feel I've made a consistent improvement at work since I started. I'm beyond punctual, arriving early every day, but only clocking in when permitted. Never had to be told to get to work. I always take responsibility for something if it goes wrong, which rarely/never happens. I help others when I can, and I've taken on more and more responsibilities willingly."

    Is the company doing well? If not asking for a raise could be a problem.

    At the meeting you need to listen carefully to what the boss says first, he may surprise you with an offer. Take responsibility for any short comings and don't be afraid to provide any improvements/contributions you've been responsible for. Don't take credit for any one else work. Don't criticize any other employee or manager.

    You can determine the COLA for the time you've spent at this job here: COLA The percentage calculated should be your minimum ask. That will simply get you even with where you were a year ago. With a COLA of 1.5% a realistic raise would be about 3%. If you've made a major contribution toward profitability for the company maybe ask for 4-5%.

    What ever you do don't go more than a day or two past the 1 year point with out asking for a meeting.
    Lee Schierer - McKean, PA
    USNA- '71
    Captain USN(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Contribute

  10. #55
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    Chase Try to relax put a number to it. A dollar or whatever you are comfortable with. If your boss has done his own homework he knows exactly how far he will go and you have to be the same. These things are easier for the boss for sure. Being boss and having to reprimand a good employee is much tougher for him or her. And loosing a good employee that does an excellent job is really tough. The more relaxed confidence you have will make it easier. Do your homework. Know what the going rates are and make your best judgement as to how the company is doing overall.
    Jim

  11. #56
    Quote Originally Posted by Chase Mueller View Post
    That's very helpful. I do have one question though, just a couple weeks ago I got a new supervisor. Literally, the day the old one was fired, he came up to me completely out of nowhere and told me how much he appreciated the fact that I've shown a massive improvement. Now that I have this new one, I feel like all that gets thrown out the window and I'm basically starting over. So should I take this to the VP that is his boss, and express these concerns? Or is it practically a workplace case of hearsay?
    That's tough. Life dealt you some bad cards if the person who was just fired is the fan you need. I suppose you might not have any idea what his communication was like with the VP and whether the appreciation was communicated. I would not recommend overstepping your new supervisor. If you or I were the new supervisor neither of us would want to be undermined right at the start. Instead I think you should work on developing good communication and a relationship with the new supervisor. Yes, you might be starting over, but I would hope the new person will see you as an asset based on your traits the same way the last supervisor did.

  12. #57
    My advice is dated. As an employee I sucked. I changed jobs like underwear. Finally I got fired from UPS, really sweet gig and I didnít want to go through an interview with my total lack of skills and poor references so I joined the Army. I accidentally fell into an MOS that have serious civilian applications. After 10 years I left, finished up my degree in that field and every since then, Iíve been interviewing them not the other way around. They go on and on about how great a place they have and all the benefits and ask me what I need to work there. I managed for 20 years, then I went back to worker status for the government to add my military time towards retirement. Luck works too.

  13. #58
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    Thanks go out to everyone who offered advice. Can't thank y'all enough.
    So, here's what I've decided: I got a finance app that is supposed to help me budget better. I'm decent at budgeting, but I figure the worst that can happen is a waste a dollar a month for this app, but it should help me. It's an app my Mark Cuban so expectations are high lol.
    As far as the raise goes, it's going to be difficult, but I decided to wait until the July to ask. After reading all the replies, I believe it would be best to wait for the year mark, as it's not my employer's problem that I'm having financial issues. If I get denied a raise, anyone in Ga looking for a hardworking 22-year-old male?
    Epilog Fusion M2 40 Watt CO2 Laser

  14. #59
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    Chase is it a necessity you stay in Georgia? With a good work record you have many options. I can tell you many companies are struggling to hire not just good help but any help now in this part of the country. (Midwest) I don't know about your area. It sounds as though you have some skills and ability that would be appealing to other employers. I know my employer is hiring but while we have locations in the none are in your state. I'm not going to add to the advice you've already received because I think nearly every angle has been covered thoroughly.

  15. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronald Blue View Post
    I think nearly every angle has been covered thoroughly.

    That is exactly why I posted my question. So many wise and knowledgeable folks here that I'm very thankful to be a part of.

    Now, as far as Georgia is concerned, not no, but h*** no! I strongly dislike Georgia. I was born here, and that's why I'm here. I suppose my preferred area would be Florida/Colorado/or anywhere like either of those two. If I got a compelling job offer out of state, in an area I don't hate, I'd strongly consider taking it.
    Epilog Fusion M2 40 Watt CO2 Laser

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