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Thread: New Lathe

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Posts
    735
    Thanks Clint. For $600 - $700 it seemed like a good deal if it would work as a lathe. Or it could be set up for some other dedicated use so that I wouldn't have to keep reconfiguring my main tools. Maybe later down the road I'll add one.

    Bill, is that you Texans response to all problems?

    Marshall
    ---------------------------
    A Stickley fan boy.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Brentwood, TN
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    653
    Quote Originally Posted by Marshall Harrison View Post
    Don't shoot me for this but....

    How would a used ShopSmith Mark 5 do as a lathe? It has variable speed and enough horsepower. There's one not too far from me that they are asking $750 but seem open to an OBO offer.
    I too have a Shopsmith, that started me out on this cycle of woodturning. I mainly keep it for the drill press, bandsaw, and inadequate table saw. After turning a couple of off balanced bowls, and chasing the Shoppie down the driveway, I only turned once a month at our local club work shops. I saved up, did research, and based on the regarded opinion of Roger, I purchased the Grizzly G0766 before any of them had been seen in the USA. I was the guy who wrote to Papa Grizzly to have the banjo size corrected (before I even received mine). I really enjoy my G0766, and it's my first and probably last lathe. I've turned spindles on the Shoppie, but not since I got the G0766. BTW I upgraded the power unit on Shoppie from a single bearing 1955 Greenie to a 1989 double bearing, which was a great improvement. Get a real lathe unless you need a variety of tools and limited space.

    Regarding the $500-700 - find a nice used Delta Midi lathe and you'll be much happier at woodturning.
    Last edited by Mark Greenbaum; 04-13-2018 at 8:38 AM.

  3. #18
    ".. I am probably looking at a lathe in the $1750 to $3500 range. "

    I considered the Powermatic 3520C and Laguna 24-36 in that price range. I am sure there are others.

    I would have probably considered the PM3520c more seriously if there were more reviews for it.

    You really should consider what other accessories you might want. If you don't know, then I would conservatively reserve about $500 of your budget for this. Some lathes - like the 18-36 vsn of the Laguna offer aftermarket upgrades like a gap bed or swing away attachment, so you can upgrade the features and capacity if you get the itch later, but don't reasonably foresee needing these on day 1. This was a big factor in my decision to go 'middle of the road'.


  4. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lewisville, NC
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    Thanks again to everyone for feedback. I had to make a quick run to Kllingspor Woodworking Shop yesterday and while I was there I looked at the Lathes they had on the floor.
    They had a Powermatic 3220, Jet 1640 and the Laguna 18/36. Of the 3, I liked the size and feel of the Laguna. But that is just standing next to it in the store. I have heard that the height of the Laguna makes it more comfortable? I'm 5' 10" in height so I don't know if the height of the Laguna is a plus or minus.
    The Powermatic seemed too massive for the turning I will do on it.... again, I'm more of a woodworker who uses a lathe occasionally than a "Turner". I'm probably leaning toward the Laguna at this point but wondered what might be the advantages of the Laguna 24-36 vs the Laguna 18-36? I know the difference in swing but wondered what features are inportant to those who might own one of these two?
    Also, do you have the mobile base attachment? I definitely want to be able to move this around when not in use. I even have my Jet Mini on wheels.

    Jim

  5. #20
    Jim, I am 5’7” and my Laguna is sitting all the way down on the levelers allowing only for adjustments to level the lathe. I would think you would need another 1” to 1.5” in spindle height. That wouldn’t be an issue with the OEM feet and the roller base will accommodate that extra height. Personally, for the money I would buy the 1836 and the bed extension over the 2436. With the bed extension on the 1836, there would be about $800 difference in the two lathes. I don’t know
    many folks that turn vessels over 18” in diameter and with the bed extension one can turn up to 32” on a platter or shallow bowl and have tailstock support.

    I have really enjoyed the Laguna and I think you would be pleased with it.

    Left click my name for homepage link.

  6. #21
    I am 5’ 10” and also have the 18-36 all the way down. I find it a tad short and am considering lifting it 2-3”.

  7. #22
    I also have the Grizzly G0766. I don't think you can find a lathe with similar specs unless you want to spend quite a bit more. It is $1795. Right now, by using the coupon code TOTH10, you can get it for $1462.50. It's an outstanding value IMO. The coupon code is from Kyle Toth's YouTube channel. He has the Grizzly G0799. You can see him set it up and use it in his videos. And you can use the code for discounts on 12 different Grizzly lathes. I'm not sure how long the code will still be valid.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Cambridge Vermont
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    205
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Maestas View Post
    I also have the Grizzly G0766. I don't think you can find a lathe with similar specs unless you want to spend quite a bit more. It is $1795. Right now, by using the coupon code TOTH10, you can get it for $1462.50. It's an outstanding value IMO. The coupon code is from Kyle Toth's YouTube channel. He has the Grizzly G0799. You can see him set it up and use it in his videos. And you can use the code for discounts on 12 different Grizzly lathes. I'm not sure how long the code will still be valid.
    The problem with Grizzly right now is they can't get any lathes in to replenish their depleted stock. It could be months before they start shipping. I'm willing to wait for mine simply because the price is too good to pass up. Others may not be willing.

  9. #24
    That's true. You can call Grizzly and find out when they expect their next shipment of anything that is out of stock. When I ordered my lathe, it was listed as out of stock on the website. They expected the next shipment within 3 weeks and I received it in that time frame. I also asked about a table saw that was out of stock. They expected a shipment in about 4 weeks, but that shipment was already sold out. So, if you are interested, call and find out when the next shipment is due. And place your order so that you are on the list to get one. I agree that it's inconvenient to wait. On the other hand, it's a good sign that the demand is high enough that they are selling out.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lewisville, NC
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    I have another question as I was thinking about the mobile base.......does anyone move their lathe outside to turn? The little Jet Mini I have now makes a huge dust/sawdust/etc. mess whenever I use it. I was thinking that I would store the new lathe(due to size) near the double door. Then I started thinking how simple it might be to roll it outside (good weather, of course) and make the mess outside of the shop.
    Trust me, I'm not a "clean freak" when it comes to my shop, but routers and lathes even with dust collection leave a dust coating on everything when I use them inside.

    Jim

  11. #26
    That sounds fun except for two things:

    Is it level outside?

    The chips and shavings can get so voluminous, I would find it easier to sweep a smooth floor that to deal with it on a driveway or yard.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Tobias View Post
    ...store the new lathe(due to size) near the double door. ... roll it outside (good weather, of course) and make the mess outside of the shop.
    Quote Originally Posted by Prashun Patel View Post
    That sounds fun except for two things:
    Is it level outside? ...I would find it easier to sweep a smooth floor that to deal with it on a driveway or yard.
    In good weather some people routinely roll other woodworking equipment outside when space is tight in the shop so why not move the lathe. You might need to make a suitable extension 220v cord. And another for power for lights and electrified accessories.

    Do you have a smooth path from the inside concrete to an outside concreted area? Even a small threshold could make moving the lathe less enjoyable.

    I wouldn't worry if the working spot is level as much as I would that it is flat. A lathe will work fine on a slight slope as long as it doesn't vibrate too much and walk down the slope!

    If the spot is not flat (all in one plane) one leg could be higher or lower than the plane of the other three, the bed can twist (cast iron is flexible), and the headstock and tailstock can be significantly out of alignment. If your spot is NOT flat and you only use the lathe outside, you could adjust one leg to align the lathe then mark the positions of the legs on the concrete and always put the lathe in the same spot.

    BTW, you check the alignment by sliding the tailstock all the way up to the headstock with point centers in each. If they are not well aligned crank up or down on one leg to twist the bed back into alignment.

    If you want to turn large, heavy blanks, better than a mobile base might be a method to jack up and move the lathe then set it down so when turning it will be resting solidly on the feet instead of the casters. There can be more vibration when resting on casters. Also, unless you are tall a mobile base might raise the lathe too much to work comfortably.

    A leaf blower can help clean up the chips outside if your shop is next to the woods.

    JKJ

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lewisville, NC
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    Thanks again for the input. The double doors from my shop open to a concrete sidewalk that leads around back under the deck( 2nd story). The area under the deck is also concrete and only slants enough to allow for runoff away from the house. The woods are just off the deck/sidewalk so I was thinking ( like John said) just blow off with leaf blower. I have a couple of those retractable reels with electrical outlets so I am thinking those will work I'll check the amps required for the lathe. I'm looking pretty seriously at the Laguna 18-36. I thought I read something about single phase input but gives 3 phase output. What exactly does that mean? I "electrically challenged"!
    Jim

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    E TN, near Knoxville
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Tobias View Post
    ...I have a couple of those retractable reels with electrical outlets so I am thinking those will work I'll check the amps required for the lathe. ...
    From their web site the Laguna is apparently 2HP, 220V. You will need a special 220v extension cord plugged into a 220v outlet. You can make one yourself or have an electrician make one up. The wire has to be sized appropriately but current requirements (number of amps) for a 2hp motor is not large so the wire size won't be excessive. (I made an extension cord for a 50 amp welder and the cable is huge!)

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Tobias View Post
    ...I thought I read something about single phase input but gives 3 phase output. What exactly does that mean? I "electrically challenged"!
    Jim
    As for the single phase input and 3-phase output, don't worry about it! Most variable speed lathes these days use that but don't bother advertising it since it is internal to the works. I suspect the marketing person at Laguna was scratching for things to put in the specs to impress potential buyers.

    Modern lathes use a VFD (variable frequency drive) circuit to get smooth and efficient electronic variable speed with plenty of torque. A VFD is usually powered from single phase electrical service, the type that comes into residences and most shops. 3-phase electrical service is normally an industrial service and very few people have it in the shop.

    The VFD takes the single-phase input, either 110v or 220v depending on the lathe, and converts it to 3-phase. In the process, it lets you control the frequency with a knob on the lathe to get variable speed. This is a wonderful way to get variable speed at higher torque from single phase electrical service. The VFD also allows easy control of things like reversing the rotation direction and provides smooth acceleration and deceleration and overload and error detection. A safety advantage is that the on/off and speed controls on the lathe are operated with safe low voltage, perhaps 10 volts DC rather that 220 volts AC!

    JKJ

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
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    I meant to add: if you find yourself using the area under the deck a lot for the lathe you might consider adding an appropriate 220v receptacle there - much more convenient than an extension cord.

    Also, I once built a two-story deck and wanted to keep the lower deck dry. I built a hidden "roof" below the upper story to catch the rain water that came through and direct it into a drainage system. I suspended 4x8 corrugated plastic panels below the upper deck, sloped them slightly to drain into a trough made from a length of PVC pipe cut in half, and hid the whole thing from below with 1x4 pt boards underneath. Took a bit of figuring and work but it was very effective. For a lathe I'd keep a tarp handy in case of a sudden rain shower!

    Another possibility to contain dust while keeping the lathe inside the shop: add ceiling-to-floor curtains around one corner of the shop and put the lathe there. That might be easier than moving it each time, keep the lathe away from the elements, let you play when it's too cold outside, and make it far more accessible for spontaneous use. (Don't forget that you have to move your tools outside too, go inside to sharpen and fetch things like sandpaper and finishes, provide for good lighting under the deck, etc.) Unless I switched to turning only simple things like bowls, I can't imaging moving everything I want at hand outside (and this picture doesn't' show the half of it!!)

    lathe_PM2_Jan17_IMG_5751.jpg

    JKJ

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