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Thread: plexi-glass shield and guard for wood lathe

  1. #1

    plexi-glass shield and guard for wood lathe

    Hi

    When I purchased my old Delta wood lathe it came with a number of tools and a few attachments. One of which was the very nice plexiglass shield and the wire guard. I've never used it and its been sitting in the corner of my basement since I go the lathe. I just always use a safety glasses or a full face shield when turning.

    it has a bracket which was retrofitted on the lathe to hold it. If memory serves me right, its installation was an insurance company requirement for the woodshop it came from.

    I'm wondering from the expertise in this forum the usefulness of this device.

    Is this worth using for turning or perhaps selling or just an item for the junk collector?

    thank you

    'mark

    shield_3.jpgshield_2.jpgshield_1.jpg

  2. #2
    Depends on what kinds of wood you turn. If you turn structurally sound wood its probably not needed. If you turn questionable wood that could potentially blow up while spinning it would be beneficial.

  3. #3
    Your faceshield and safety glasses provide virtually no protection except for protection from bits of bark and similar small pieces. The lathe mounted Plexiglas shield on the other hand does provide significant impact protection from large pieces. I think that it's worth keeping ... and actually using when you are turning something that has the potential of flying apart.
    Bill

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Erie, PA
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    I would be very careful about trusting plexiglas. We used it once for demoing and a piece came loose and went right through it. We then went to Lexan which we could not break with a hammer.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
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    Read the American Woodturner June 2014 article by Lynne Yamaguchi for compelling reasoning on lathe screens as well as headgear.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Boehme View Post
    Your faceshield and safety glasses provide virtually no protection except for protection from bits of bark and similar small pieces. The lathe mounted Plexiglas shield on the other hand does provide significant impact protection from large pieces. I think that it's worth keeping ... and actually using when you are turning something that has the potential of flying apart.
    I would be interested in what information you base your comment of "virtually no protection" with a faceshield on. I have been hit in the face with pieces much larger than small pieces of bark and had no problem at all wearing the faceshield. Here's a look at an entire bowl coming off and hitting the faceshield with no harm done.. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mH5f2_KyZ5c

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
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    Sparta Tn
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    I agree. Although I think in some cases a face shield is limited protection. A good face shield would reduce or deflect the impact considerably. Granted a guard over the lathe would be better. I have also been hit in the face shield by a fairly substantical piece. Knocked me down and broke the face shield but I was fine. I use the Uvex face shield that I think is quite a bit stronger than the flat face shields.
    https://www.amazon.com/Uvex-Bionic-P...ds=face+shield.

  8. #8
    To me, like Carl said in his video, first line of defense is standing out of the line of fire. The piece he was turning went pretty much straight up, and I don't know if it came off going up or bounced off of the tool rest. Most face shields are made to 'deflect' rather than take head on impact of anything more than shavings and small chunks. Polycarbonate is a standard for clear non shattering material. For the sloppy wet wood I turn, it wouldn't be much help because I wouldn't be able to see through it after about 30 seconds.

    robo hippy

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
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    Cambridge Vermont
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    I doubt it's plexiglass. Usually for something where impact protecting is it's job polycarbonate (Lexan) is used. Unlike plexiglass it won't shatter. I've always been the type of person where unless there's a reason to get rid of it, like I need the space or it's tying up money, I keep it. You never know what will change in the future.

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    As one of 3 people that I personally know that uses the provided guard, I would recommend using the guard. As mentioned, "plexiglass" is not that great in actual protection. And any lexan/acrylic as Robo says gets dirty surprisingly quick. I'd ditch that if it is plexi.
    Painting the guard flat black makes it a bit easier to see through. I still also use a faceshield and safety glasses as the cage does not stop the little stuff, which the faceshield does. I use glasses since I have been hit in the eye (no injury) with a shard that bounced off my smock under the faceshield.

  11. #11
    I have a 3520B and always use my shroud as a protector. I know some people donít. But itís saved me more than once from eating a big chunk of cedar.

  12. #12
    As others have said, it was probably just an assumption that the plastic is Plexiglas which is a brand name of acrylic plastic that isn't intended to provide impact protection. No doubt, the plastic is actually polycarbonate (Lexan) which is the material used in faceshields and is impact rated.

    To Barry, the packaging that your faceshield came in states the level of impact defined by ANSI Z87. If you didn't read it, you can Google ANSI Z87. Something worth being aware of is that all of the energy of an impact gets absorbed by your head. So while a faceshied might save your face from major lacerations, there may be hidden damage to your brain. If the impact is hard enough to ring your bell or make you see stars then there is no doubt that your brain has also been injured.
    Bill

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Boehme View Post
    As others have said, it was probably just an assumption that the plastic is Plexiglas which is a brand name of acrylic plastic that isn't intended to provide impact protection. No doubt, the plastic is actually polycarbonate (Lexan) which is the material used in faceshields and is impact rated.

    To Barry, the packaging that your faceshield came in states the level of impact defined by ANSI Z87. If you didn't read it, you can Google ANSI Z87. Something worth being aware of is that all of the energy of an impact gets absorbed by your head. So while a faceshied might save your face from major lacerations, there may be hidden damage to your brain. If the impact is hard enough to ring your bell or make you see stars then there is no doubt that your brain has also been injured.
    Good information Bill.... I've had 3 concussions that I know of.... none from woodturning!!!!... I turn mostly kiln dried hardwood which is fairly safe as long as it's chucked properly but when I'm doing spalted wood or burls I tend to stand out of the way until it's turned down and seems fairly stable...

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    Harrisburg, NC
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    741
    OT from the original "guard" question but be aware there are differences in the Z87 ratings.
    Short..
    Z87 must withstand a 1" steel ball dropped from fifty (50) inches.
    However with the + rating (Z87+) it must withstand a pointed object about 1.4 pounds dropped from the same fifty inches and it must also pass a 1/4 inch steel ball projected at about 100 mph. If it has the + rating it must be embossed on the lens and each part of the frame.

    Even with the + there is not a lot of protection imho. I have the Bionic with the + and I can flex the shield easily between a thumb and one finger. About the same resistance as a paper file folder but it can help deflect or keep items out of the eye. The frame of the Bionic should help a lot but I did see one posting where the upper frame itself broke from the impact.
    "I became insane, with long intervals of horrible sanity." - Edgar Allan Poe

  15. #15
    Ok all appreciate the advice.

    I actually misspoke calling it plexiglass, it just looks like plexi, but I have no way of knowing. Its designed and constructed very well. I was asking because from both the class I took on beginning turning a few yeas back and all the vids I've watched on line and on fine woodworking, I've never seen one used. Of course it would get in the way of any decent camera angles and the like.

    best

    'mark

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