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Thread: Diamond Stones

  1. #1
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    Feb 2018
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    Diamond Stones

    Howdy folks:

    Been looking online to get some diamond stones to do my sharpening of planes/chisels. Have been using a series of japanese waterstones, and only recently even heard of diamond stones.

    I was looking at DMT on Amazon, but they have some pretty poor reviews.

    Does any one have any recommendations for diamond stone manufacturers of quality? I understand that there's a difference between a full metal plate where the diamonds are some how baked right into them, versus those cheaper ones like DMT where they are some how affixed poorly to the surface.

    Not an expert here. I just don't want to buy some land fill and would like to hunt down a good set. I'm new to hand woodworking, but I have learned that keeping a sharp edge is key.

    (One downside to my waterstone is that I noticed that my surface wears uneavenly. I use a honing guide which keeps rolling in one place, and even if pick up and move, it still leaves a bit of a hollow. I have to get a coarse flattener soon and flatten the surface.

    But from watching the vids, it seems like there's far less mess with diamond stones.

    Love to know what manufacturer/models you recommend. Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    I've used Diamonds for a long time now, havent had any issues with either Eze-Lap or DMT at all, tbh the Dia-Sharp DMT are better quality imo. Atoma is another good manufaturer havent used them myself yet, still in the mail, but heard plenty good about them.

    The biggest problem is not the Diamond Plates its the one using them, you DONT wanna use alot of pressure if you do that you ruin it and blame the plate for being "poor quality". Be that the perforated plates or the full surface ones i personally use.

    Personally id go with either DMT or Atoma and non perforated just to handle smaller narrow tools alot easier, it does work with the perforated ones if you're carefull but its a bit of a pain.

    Edit: forgot skip the high grit DMT plates and keep using your Waterstones, the "8000" Grit Diamondplate is only about a 3000 grit JIS stone so you either need a Strop or a Ceramic/Water/Oilstone anyways.

    Coarse, Fine and Superfine 250/400, 600 and 1200 Grit are about the only 3 plates you actually need and do buy the larger plates if at all possible the small ones do work but its easier to work Plane blades on a 8x3 " (~76mm wide Plate). And you only need a spraybottle with Water, a bit of it on the surface is enough some use Glass cleaner but water works just fine for me.
    Last edited by Philipp Jaindl; 03-12-2018 at 3:33 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
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    Edmonton, Alberta
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    Hi Bob,

    DMT is fine, and for the most part make a decent product. I hear they back up their product pretty well too, so I wouldn't worry about it. I wouldn't spend too much money on a diamond stone, and would only recommend you purchase a coarse diamond stone - the fine and extra fine diamond stones are too coarse to get a neander keen edge anyways, and diamond stones generally wear out fairly fast (even more so if you apply too much pressure while sharpening). If you do have your mind set on diamond stones though, a useful tip is to use water (with a tiny bit of detergent) to reduce loading on the stone and reduce wear on your stone.

    I only ever use my diamond stones for rougher sharpening now, having tried many different set ups my Imanishi ceramic waterstones seem to work best for me and the steels I use.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Britton View Post
    Does any one have any recommendations for diamond stone manufacturers of quality? I understand that there's a difference between a full metal plate where the diamonds are some how baked right into them, versus those cheaper ones like DMT where they are some how affixed poorly to the surface.
    Almost all diamond plates use the same approach: The diamonds are attached to a steel substrate by an electroplated nickel binding layer. That's true for DMT, Trend, EZE-Lap, Atoma, and probably a whole lot more besides. The differentiators between plates tend to be:
    • Diamond type. Synthetic diamond abrasives come in mono- and poly-crystalline flavors. The monocrystalline kind last longer because they don't break down, but they cut slower at first because they don't expose fresh points. Polycrystalline are the opposite. EZE-Lap is the only major plate maker using polycrystalline diamonds that I know of (they use a mix of mono- and poly-crystalline).
    • Uniformity. Some manufacturers do a better job than others of controlling both particle size and how "high" they sit within the nickel binder. DMT has been known to have problems with both, such that their stones initially cut much faster than they should but then setting down as the high/large particles are knocked out. Atoma seem to be the best of the bunch in this respect.
    • Durability. As you imply, these plates only have a single layer of diamonds, so sooner or later they will dull or fall out. Dulling can't be prevented, but falling out depends on the maker's electroplating process. I've had great experiences with Atoma, OK experiences with DMT
    • Flatness. Some plates are flatter than others. Atoma are consistently exceptional in my experience, while EZE-Lap are all over the place with some very non-flat plates. The others are in between.

    I use mostly Atoma these days, though I use them mostly for stone flattening.

  5. #5
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    After trying all types of things, I saw a Paul Sellers video on sharpening using a 250, 600 and 8000 diamond stone. After buying them and moving to free hand as I saw him do, I don't see myself ever returning to any other way. At least for me, it's fast, effective and the result is sharper chisels and plane irons that I've ever experienced. I think mine (in 2010) were DMT and since bought the same ones in EZ lap about four years ago that haven't been out of the package as the original DMTs continue to get me a burr in a minute or less on the 250 stone.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Elma ny near buffalo
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    Thank you, fellas:

    I am going to grab an Atoma DS or three. One to level off my waterstones, but others to try as alternatives to the waterstones. I also had not stropped before and only just learned about doing that. So I've got a leather strop on the way with the green/white paste to finish off my irons and chisels.

  7. #7
    I've had a half dozen DMTs for about 4 years. They work well, subject to what Patrick notes above.

    I had a problem with the duosharp flaking. As Hasin noted, DMT supported the product very well. They immediately replaced it with no questions asked. It's DMT for my money.
    Last edited by Frederick Skelly; 03-13-2018 at 6:46 PM. Reason: Spelling
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  8. #8
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    Aug 2007
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    I use a diamond hone followed up by stropping on rawhide glued to a board. My edges are razor sharp. I don't like the oil on a stone.

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hasin Haroon View Post
    I only ever use my diamond stones for rougher sharpening now, having tried many different set ups my Imanishi ceramic waterstones seem to work best for me and the steels I use.
    The Imanishi polishers (particularly the 8K) are really hard to beat for the money IMO.

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