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Thread: How to safely and accurately crosscut 30"?

  1. #1

    How to safely and accurately crosscut 30"?

    Hi all,

    Normally I handle my crosscuts on a festool MFT/3 complete with TS55 - I've found that when tuned it produces square results.

    30" is too wide to fit on the table, and I'm seeking input on how to accomplish an accurate safe crosscut.

    I considered the tablesaw for a minute but it's way too wide to use a miter gauge, and utilizing the fence wouldn't produce a perpendicular cut to the currently perfectly parallel sides.

    There's got to be a simple solution that I'm not thinking of.

    The piece is 35"Hx30"W - looking to shorten it to 33"Hx30"W.

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Skil saw with a straight edge is what I use

  3. #3
    You could try cutting across the 'front' of the table instead of the side. Just mount the MFT's fence & track 90 degrees from their usual position.
    Last edited by Harvey Miller; 03-12-2018 at 8:54 AM.
    Just a Duffer

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    You have a tracksaw. Make a perpendicular line using the 3-4-5 triangle and lay the tack on it. Once you are satisfied with the cut then rip to width on the tablesaw.

  5. #5
    I use a panel cutting sled on my TS. 30" is pushing it, but doable.

    Its basically the same as a sled but the fence is on the far edge.

    You need an outfeed table to safely use it with enough past the blade to support the cut.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harvey Miller View Post
    You could try cutting across the 'front' of the table instead of the side. Just mount the MFT's fence & track 90 degrees from their usual position.
    This...or your saw on a separate track with the material on the floor over foam or boards.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Harvey Miller View Post
    You could try cutting across the 'front' of the table instead of the side. Just mount the MFT's fence & track 90 degrees from their usual position.
    I don't think this will work as the front of the table has a clamping mechanism that holds the track in place (ensures it retains it's square position). I realize it's possible to make the perpendicular line and cut it with a track on a piece of foam, that was going to be my last resort.

    I was/am asking the question as I've found it's extremely challenging to get an exactly perfect perpendicular cut when merely laying the track on top of the wood, especially every 30+ inches.

    I've learned over time that obsessing over the details to ensure things are square helps me a lot in the build process.

  8. #8
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    If I understand correctly, Festool has clamps that slide into a slot on the bottom of the track. Get two of those, clamp the track to the sheet of wood while elevated and hanging off the end of the table, and voila!

  9. #9
    I have used Robert's method. A single-runner sled with the fence on the leading edge. This gives plenty of support on the infeed.

    Frankly, if the rail on my table saw were long enough, I would feel comfortable cutting this using the rip fence. I think 30" is plenty of registration. Also, you are doing a trimming cut, so you can use both hands on the right side of the blade to push. If you wanted additional insurance, use a feather board. But I've made such cross cuts on the table saw just fine. Know your saw and your risks.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Prashun Patel View Post
    I have used Robert's method. A single-runner sled with the fence on the leading edge. This gives plenty of support on the infeed.

    Frankly, if the rail on my table saw were long enough, I would feel comfortable cutting this using the rip fence. I think 30" is plenty of registration. Also, you are doing a trimming cut, so you can use both hands on the right side of the blade to push. If you wanted additional insurance, use a feather board. But I've made such cross cuts on the table saw just fine. Know your saw and your risks.
    I had thought of this but with the nature of the crosscut, the fence would be registering against a probably-not-perpendicular line on the wood to execute the crosscut, which would result in a parallel probably-not-perpendicular line. After the crosscuts were completed then I'd have the opposite problem with a rip cut, if that makes sense.

  11. #11
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    radial arm saw.
    Bil lD.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    radial arm saw.
    Bil lD.
    For a 30" crosscut?

  13. #13
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    Panel cutting crosscut sled?

    I built one several years back. It work great but is used seldomly and takes a lot of space.

    However, for your project, I would use the track saw to get a 90 corner and then go to the table saw. You donít need complicated set-ups to get square edges. Neanders do it all the time.
    Shawn

    "no trees were harmed in the creation of this message, however some electrons were temporarily inconvenienced."

    "I resent having to use my brain to do your thinking"

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Lanciani View Post
    For a 30" crosscut?
    You would definitely have to flip the board but even at that the average RAS has a crosscut of around 13" so that wouldn't work.

  15. #15
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    Tracksaw. But I used a sled with my TS to cut off 30" doors before I got the tracksaw. Awkward but doable. Clamp the piece to the sled and support the overhang on a roller stand.
    NOW you tell me...

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