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Thread: Suggestions Please

  1. #1
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    Suggestions Please

    I have a new pole building shop. I will finally have power in it this week. Well at least to the meter base. I'm going to insulate with fiberglass in the walls. Eventually using the same ribbed painted tin as liner to finish things off. I need to run 2 X 6 horizontal studs fastened to the 2 X 4 stringers that the sheet metal is screwed to. What I am thinking of doing is boring holes into the 2 X 6's 4-4-1/2" deep and screwing them into the stringers. Is there a better way to attach them? How would you achieve the end result? I want it to not take a lot of time to do. I haven't tried any yet. I was also thinking of using possibly Kreg screws for softwood or something similar with the large head to resist pull through. I considered pocket holes also but that seems like it would take more time but I haven't tried it. I know you guys are a wealth of knowledge. Thanks

  2. #2
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    Are your stringers going to be on the face of the wall or embedded between the vertical studs? Regardless, I'd probably use whatever method is fastest and less complicated since they will be hidden behind your tin. If you plan on hanging anything heavy, then you'll want them stout and secure. In the areas where they only need to support the metal, you don't need substantial material...1-by would even be fine.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronald Blue View Post
    I have a new pole building shop. I will finally have power in it this week. Well at least to the meter base. I'm going to insulate with fiberglass in the walls. Eventually using the same ribbed painted tin as liner to finish things off. I need to run 2 X 6 horizontal studs fastened to the 2 X 4 stringers that the sheet metal is screwed to. What I am thinking of doing is boring holes into the 2 X 6's 4-4-1/2" deep and screwing them into the stringers. Is there a better way to attach them? How would you achieve the end result? I want it to not take a lot of time to do. I haven't tried any yet. I was also thinking of using possibly Kreg screws for softwood or something similar with the large head to resist pull through. I considered pocket holes also but that seems like it would take more time but I haven't tried it. I know you guys are a wealth of knowledge. Thanks
    I've never used 2x6 "studs" horizontally. Are your 2x4s flat against the poles with the tin already fastened to the outside? It sounds like you plan to run these horizontal 2x6s sticking out from the 2x4s to give a 7" thick cavity for insulation.

    Concrete floor? For rigidity, wiring, and ease of insulating it seems it would be better to build a more conventional stud wall. My shop is also a "pole" construction. I used 6x6 pressure treated posts set in concrete every 10' or so to hold up beams for the roof trusses. I fastened PT 2x6s to the floor and ran 2x6s to the bottom of the trusses then put vertical 2x6s between the floor and the ceiling. I used deck screws to toe"nail" the tops and bottoms of the studs to the plates. Since the walls are not load-bearing it's easy to put doors and windows anywhere. The entire thing is very sturdy. I filled the 2x6 cavities with insulation and paneled the inside with 1/2" plywood.

    If running 2x6s horizontally down the wall with the faces of the boards parallel to the floor I'd still probably toenail to existing horizontal stringers but unless the lengths were very short it seems some vertical blocking would be needed anyway for rigidity.

    If I misunderstand the whole plan please enlighten!

    From my shop construction:
    shop_wall_construction_B.jpg shop_wall_construction_A.jpg

    JKJ

  4. #4
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    The 2 X 4's are flat against the posts as you stated. The posts are 8' on center. Concrete slab in place also. Pex in the floor for heat hopefully this winter. I should mention also the side walls are 14' also. I know everything is a trade off. If I use plywood or osb on the walls then I will have to paint them. The tin would be white and cut to the 14' length so it would speed the installation considerably. The wiring will be ran in conduit.

  5. #5
    I just completed putting the metal on the inside of my shop. Though my construction is not post-built, it is stick built with 2x6's on 24" centers. On the inside, I used 1x4's for perts, nailed to the 2x6's, for the metal to screw the tin to. I used a different color up to the windows (light gray), then bright white up from there. It made cutting the tin around the windows much easier and also brought some color into the shop. If you use 2x6's horizontally, I would assume you will be screwing the tin into the small 1 1/2" edge. That makes it a lot harder to screw the conduit boxes, etc. to.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Randy Henry View Post
    I just completed putting the metal on the inside of my shop. Though my construction is not post-built, it is stick built with 2x6's on 24" centers. On the inside, I used 1x4's for perts, nailed to the 2x6's, for the metal to screw the tin to. I used a different color up to the windows (light gray), then bright white up from there. It made cutting the tin around the windows much easier and also brought some color into the shop. If you use 2x6's horizontally, I would assume you will be screwing the tin into the small 1 1/2" edge. That makes it a lot harder to screw the conduit boxes, etc. to.
    That's some good thoughts Randy. So you did sort of a wainscot with tin then? I never considered securing the conduit into the horizontal studs. I will have to give that some thought.

  7. #7
    Ron, I did a wainscot without the transition trim between the colors like I did on the exterior. On the inside, the light gray went up first on the bottom, they were 36", then the upper panels went on. The upper panels over-lap the bottom panels app. 1" to provide room for a little adjustment in aligning the panels even. The electrical boxes are at the transition. When I get a chance, I will take a few pic's of how it turned out. Just finishing up the electrical now, so it's a bit of a mess. FYI, I used #2 metal on the inside. The only difference between that and #1 is the 40 year vs. 20 year warranty. It's on the inside, who cares? All the colors came in #2 and were the same price. Another recommendation I have, is, before you screw your metal on, diagram with accurate measurements on all your perts, and make several copies. Makes snapping a chalk line for the screws accurate, and be able to plan for the future on where to hang stuff. I also put in extra perts for things like the d/c pipe, etc.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Randy Henry View Post
    ... Another recommendation I have, is, before you screw your metal on, diagram with accurate measurements on all your perts, and make several copies. ...
    We think alike. In addition to the diagram, I also like to take a photograph of wiring, plumbing, and internal structure before I insulate and panel a wall. Both of these make tearing into it later to fix or modify something far easier!

    JKJ

  9. #9
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    Oct 2006
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    Replied in my thread too. You are bookcasing your pole barn but also have wall girts. Those terms will help you search. I pocketholed my bookcased 2x6s to the wall girts and to the posts. Each also has 2" holes in the ends filor wire runs. Tons of time and screws. Its amazingly strong. Between the posts i have vertical 2x6 facebfoor to ceiling ph screwd to the bookcased 2x6s. Those went on after the wiring was done and insulation installed.
    Glad its my shop I am responsible for - I only have to make me happy.

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