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Thread: Sawstop Injury I didn't think this could happen.

  1. #1

    Sawstop Injury I didn't think this could happen.

    I might be a bit concerned if this happened to me.

  2. #2
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    Actually, this vid was discussed in another thread. Note that the guy was using a Freud ripping blade with anti-kickback "shoulders", which SawStop recommends against. I mentioned this to the guy in the comments to his video. He responded that he wasn't aware of that issue, he called SawStop and they confirmed it.

  3. #3
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    Yeah, I'd be concerned about anyone who doesn't use a blade guard...........Regards, Rod.

  4. #4
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    And this is why I love Micro Jig GRR-Rippers. I use them for practically every cut I make on the table saw. I've got a 20+ year-old Delta that I long ago removed the blade guard because it was so poorly designed. For riving, I use the Micro Jig Splitter. It does a decent job of mimicking a riving knife. Together they have made my old American table saw much safer.
    “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness..." - Mark Twain

    Diapers and Politicians need to be changed often... Usually for the same reason.

  5. #5
    This guy ignored rule #1--"don't push your body parts into the blade." Instead he relied on a contraption to protect him.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Julie Moriarty View Post
    And this is why I love Micro Jig GRR-Rippers. I use them for practically every cut I make on the table saw. I've got a 20+ year-old Delta that I long ago removed the blade guard because it was so poorly designed. For riving, I use the Micro Jig Splitter. It does a decent job of mimicking a riving knife. Together they have made my old American table saw much safer.
    Hi Julie, the GRR-Rippers would be illegal to use in a workplace for good reason, they require the removal of the blade guard.

    Anytime you have no guard you drastically increase your risk of kickback (contact with the top of the blade by a work piece), or accidental contact with the blade by a body part.

    regards, Rod.

  7. #7
    Julie,

    I totally agree the guard on my TS is actually a safety hazard and I took it off a long time ago.

    But even a Gripper is no guarantee.

    Any device that could catch the spinning blade when lifting and returning can bring the hand in contact with the blade (how do I know this?). If we're lucky, we just loose the tip of a finger like this guy.

    Unfortunately for some of us :-), safety starts between the ears & IME (30+ yrs) numerous, repetitive procedures or cuts is when we are most likely to get in trouble.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Rod Sheridan View Post
    Yeah, I'd be concerned about anyone who doesn't use a blade guard...........Regards, Rod.
    Exactly the case and why I have no sympathy for a lot of people who get injured. Taking the safety equipment off of your saw except when absolutely necessary and then operating unsafely, that's your fault not the saw's. If you're that stupid, you deserve what you get. But what's the first thing most Saw Stop owners do when they get their "safe" saw? They take off the blade guard!
    Last edited by Lee Schierer; 02-26-2018 at 6:11 PM.

  9. #9
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    Seems like he could have done quite a few things differently to have avoided that avoidable accident. In then end I think this one just comes down to education.
    If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Henderson View Post
    Exactly the case and why I have no sympathy for a lot of people who get injured. Taking the safety equipment off of your saw except when absolutely necessary and then operating unsafely, that's your fault not the saw's. If you're that stupid, you deserve what you get. But what's the first thing most Saw Stop owners do when they get their "safe" saw? They take off the blade guard!
    Any of evidence that more Sawstop owners do this than owners of other brands?
    I think not.
    Last edited by Lee Schierer; 02-26-2018 at 6:10 PM.
    Just a Duffer

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Harvey Miller View Post
    Any of evidence that more Sawstop owners do this than owners of other brands?
    I think not.
    We know what happened in the video had nothing to do with brands. It is a common scene seen in MANY youtube videos whatever the brand of the saw is, and it is a very bad habit of many tablesaw users. This guy was lucky that he kept his old habit but was using a SS. The money he spent on his SS...has been well spent in the circumstances.

    You can also find many many youtube videos, including some produced by some better known woodworkers who do not use a guard or even a riving knife/splitter on their tablesaws. Simply too many of them.

    Simon
    Last edited by Simon MacGowen; 02-26-2018 at 4:28 PM.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Henderson View Post
    Exactly the case and why I have no sympathy for a lot of people who get injured. Taking the safety equipment off of your saw except when absolutely necessary and then operating unsafely, that's your fault not the saw's. If you're that stupid, you deserve what you get. But what's the first thing most Saw Stop owners do when they get their "safe" saw? They take off the blade guard!
    I am sure this guy didn't buy the SS with the dust collection blade guard. The guard must be left on in order for the overarm dust collection to work. The only time that guard should come off is when one uses a dado blade, or uses a cross cut sled, or when sawing thin strips.

    I still don't understand why people keep saying the guard obstructs the viewing. Viewing is done before you switch on the saw.


    Simon
    Last edited by Lee Schierer; 02-26-2018 at 6:10 PM.

  13. #13
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    This problem of removing guards is reinforced by both woodworking shows and magazines. I see more TS's w/o guards than with them in FWW's articles. Same thing with New Yankee Woodworker and This Old House. FWW can at least hide behind the fact that most articles come from woodworkers not under their employ. Not the case with NYW and TOH though.

    I understand that some guards are poorly made and frustrating to use, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't use a guard. There are at least a couple aftermarket ones available that work very well. Do some research and invest in your safety.

    John

  14. #14
    I have the Grripper and use it for certain cuts only. Every time I use it I will lose the SS overarm dust collection feature which is very effective in dust control. Even with the SS, I don't like the feeling that my hand is passing directly over a spinning blade, to tell the truth.

    Simon

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Harvey Miller View Post
    Any of evidence that more Sawstop owners do this than owners of other brands?
    I think not.
    I don't care, I think the same of all of them. Disabling your safety equipment, then complaining you got hurt is irrational.

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