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Thread: First chair comments sought

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
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    314

    First chair comments sought

    This is my first chair and I have used a rather simple design in that the seat is not sloped toward the back and the legs are rectangular for the most part. The splat is also straightforward.

    As you can see (or maybe not), there are elements of Greene & Greene (cloud lifts and ebony pegs) along with Maloof style joints for attachment of the seat to the legs.

    I would appreciate comments on the design and construction techniques used. For example, should the tops of the back legs be cut shorter? Are there further embellishments to the splat that you can suggest? Will the Maloof joints (which are quite snug) survive if glued with epoxy and reinforced with a single 2" screw? Also, if you think the overall result is just too clunky, I would appreciate hearing that.

    Thanks for any insights or suggestions.
    David
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Rustic? Well, no. That was not my intention!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Rochester, MN
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    3,484
    I like the back and the tops of the back legs look fine as they are. I'm not fond of the cloud lift detail on the sides of the seat and from what I can see in the second image, the seat looks to thin. The sides of the seat just seem to detract from the rest of the chair for me. As for the pegs on the back legs, I think I'd prefer the top ones in each pair to be more outboard and the bottom ones; the reverse of what you have now.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
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    472
    I think the lower back legs should angle back because the chair can flip backwards easier the way it is. Centre of gravity and all that. I agree the leg tops need the be somewhat shorter or have the top higher. I think the front seat corners are a little too sharp. My knees always find sharp corners. As a first kick at the cat it's a decent chair. Your instincts are good, just needing a little refining. All this from someone that hasn't made a chair for a grownup.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Posts
    621
    I don't like the cloud lift on the sides of the chair seat and the back legs are a little too high for me. The part about angling the rear legs for stability makes sense but, I'm neither here nor there on that.

  5. #5
    Not a fan of Greene and Greene....I think guys being led to the electric chair see elements of It and Mission stuff. I like the Deco look of the seat and think the back could use more of it. It would make a good "hall chair".

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Tasmania
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    1,668
    I like this chair. The styling immediately reminded me of E-13B numerals like on the bottom of a cheque form (old magnetic reader characters) and also the Cybermen in Dr Who. The styling is reasonably unified which is good. A detail change that would make it look better is to make the pegs for the top and bottom splat joints line up rather than being stepped. All the other holes/pegs are in lines. The steps are in the overall shape, not the pegs.

    The seat could do with a little more thickness at the front edge or else less profiling of the seat. A thicker seat might look too heavy.

    I am not confident the Maloof joints will last the distance regardless of the glue used. If you look at chairs in general from a structural viewpoint, they either have good M & T joints at the top of the leg or else lower stretchers between the legs. These methods are commonly used because they work. All that being said, it depends on the end use. A dining chair in a pub needs to be much stronger than a hall chair at home.

    Back leg height is OK but would be OK shorter as well. The design also lends itself to a very tall backed feature chair. The straight back leg can mean a back heavy chair, but you have a wider seat at the from which may counter this tendency. You need to test it. Throw your coat or a towel over the back and see if it falls over.

    Keep up the good work. There needs to be more work like this pushing the boundaries. Cheers
    Every construction obeys the laws of physics. Whether we like or understand the result is of no interest to the universe.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Posts
    314
    Thank you for all the feedback. My wish is to build a prototype for a set of kitchen chairs. This result is a bit too large and boxy. I will finish this version and start with another. This one will be placed in our bedroom or office. It did pass the tip test suggested by Wayne.

    He also planted the idea that a market for these chairs may be found among bankers or computer programmers. The crowd of Dr Who fans is too small for consideration.
    Rustic? Well, no. That was not my intention!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Tasmania
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    1,668
    Dr Who crowd too small?! Not in the rest of the English speaking world! More to the point is that Cybermen are not exactly lovable. Cheers!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
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    314
    Attached is a photo of the final product. The reflection is because the final finish coat is still wet. It is not the prototype for my set of kitchen chairs any longer. I will start over again but keep some of the features from this chair.

    Overall, I have to say that this project is not as difficult as I suspected. Jigs substantially help with the milling. I am also in the market for some upgraded spokeshaves to create more rounded edges. The current version is too blocky and Mel thinks it looks like an electric chair. He has a point.

    Other suggested changes that I will probably follow for the next version.
    Rearrange pegs on back legs and back rails.
    Front of seat should be left thicker.
    Shorten tops of back legs. (I will also try the look of a wider crest rail.)
    Consider lower stretchers.

    Thanks for the help.

    chair1done.jpg
    Rustic? Well, no. That was not my intention!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    151
    The joining of the back legs to the seat look a little weak for someone who leans back in this type of chair. Add a bracket.

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