Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 46 to 48 of 48

Thread: Difference between router and table, and shaper?

  1. #46
    In case nobody has mentioned it...... shapers are dirt cheap these days, at least on Seattle Craigslist. Router tables have destroyed the home shop shaper market.

    I had a nice condition Delta Homecraft 1/2" spindle shaper that I paid $350 for twenty some years ago. Several tries selling on CL starting at $200 including 18 Delta cutters. After several price drops it finally went for 75 bucks!! At that time there were 4 others that had been listed for weeks.

    I'm about to list a Delta heavy duty shaper (base style like a Unisaw), newer style with two speeds and 1 phase, 2hp, TEFC motor. I'll be lucky to get 300 bucks.

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Griswold Connecticut
    Posts
    6,715
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Heidrick View Post

    Reversing is used so you can flip your cutter over, not for wild grain patters.
    Mike

    I think that I over simplified my statement with regards to grain orientation.
    One thing that really hasn't been brought up in this thread is the comparison of the router mounted in a table, versus a shaper, is the use of templates. It is this function that I was referring to as far as grain orientation.
    It is very advantageous to be able to start curves, arcs and complex forms from either direction, ensuring that you are always cutting with the grain, and not worry about blowing out the inside or outside edges of a curve because the rotation changed the orientation.
    On the router table you need matching templates, to flip the workpiece over to make sure that you're cutting with grain. On the shaper, you just flip the cutter head over,reverse the motor, and the workpiece never has to come off the template form.

    I've done more template work on shapers than anything else. Almost all of it has to be done by hand feeding the material. I find the shaper is easier on the hands with regards to vibration. Of course, maybe that's because I make more robust templates, heavier and bigger, than I would for a router.
    Last edited by Mike Cutler; 02-03-2018 at 7:29 AM.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  3. #48
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Cutler View Post
    Mike

    I think that I over simplified my statement with regards to grain orientation.
    One thing that really hasn't been brought up in this thread is the comparison of the router mounted in a table, versus a shaper, is the use of templates. It is this function that I was referring to as far as grain orientation.
    It is very advantageous to be able to start curves, arcs and complex forms from either direction, ensuring that you are always cutting with the grain, and not worry about blowing out the inside or outside edges of a curve because the rotation changed the orientation.
    On the router table you need matching templates, to flip the workpiece over to make sure that you're cutting with grain. On the shaper, you just flip the cutter head over,reverse the motor, and the workpiece never has to come off the template form.

    I've done more template work on shapers than anything else. Almost all of it has to be done by hand feeding the material. I find the shaper is easier on the hands with regards to vibration. Of course, maybe that's because I make more robust templates, heavier and bigger, than I would for a router.
    Absolutely Mike. Good points. If you're doing super tight curves, you may find it hard to get in there with a shaper head of larger diameter. There is a place for router tables sometimes.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •