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Thread: Domino - Center on 3/4" Stock?

  1. #1
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    Domino - Center on 3/4" Stock?

    I'm seriously considering the purchase of a Festool Domino. I've watched lots of videos showing the use for different joints and such. I know that the centering marks for stock thickness are in metric vs imperial. Almost everything I make is with 3/4" actual thickness stock. I see that Seneca makes an adapter for 1/2" and 3/4" nominal stock, but I assume they mean the newer thinner thicknesses of 1/2" and 3/4" plywood. What are people doing to make it easiest to perfectly center your Domino cuts in 3/4" solid wood?

  2. #2
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    You can set the depth to anything you want. Thereís a scale (metric) to help with the setting. Or to make the depth setting easily repeatable, you can make a spacer to slide into the depth stop while youíre setting the depth. If you set the built-in stop to 16 mm (one of the presets), and add a spacer of .060Ē, youíll be centered on .75Ē stock.

  3. #3
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    Does it matter if the slots aren't perfectly centered on the thickness of the stock? It's most important that the slots are the same distance from the reference edges on both pieces. 8 mm is pretty close to 3/8 in. And will get the slots pretty close to center

  4. #4
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    What Dave says is true...as long as you are referencing from the correct surfaces, variation from centering doesn't matter. As to the metric scale, if you don't work in metric (I recently converted to metric myself and am loving it), it's handy to have a digital caliper in your shop so you can measure thickness in both inches and MM and convert back and forth in a snap. That will make it very easy to use tools that only have metric scales with stock that's already sized to Imperial thickness. They are not expensive, either.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #5
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    Making a shim sounds like a good call, but it can be tough to get dead on 3/4 all the time. I could have everything planned on 3/4 then realize I need to take a bit more off because of tearout for instance.

    It also shouldnít matter if itís centered, as long as you use the same reference face and adjust accordingly.

  6. #6
    Seneca sells the plastic replacement thickness gauges for both Dominos in imperial. Kinda spendy though.

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the tips. I just placed the order for the Domino 500 kit plus the tenon assortment. I have a large kitchen hutch next on the list with tons of mortise/tenon joints.

    Jason

  8. #8
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    Tim Celeski discusses his solution to your exact concern.

    http://www.finewoodworking.com/2014/...ased-materials

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Ramsey View Post
    Tim Celeski discusses his solution to your exact concern.

    http://www.finewoodworking.com/2014/...ased-materials
    Centered placements are BAD!

    Frankly, I read that article when it first came out and my immediate conclusion was that Tim created a solution to a problem that did not exist. If his solution was indeed a practical one, many vendors would start making a commercial version of his.

    I started using the DF500 and later the XL as well almost since Day 1 they were released and I work with both scales of measurements. Never one time did I have to worry about centering any domino placements.

    People jump on gadgets all the time and there are many after-the-market Festool gadgets that people love. Trust me, the dominoplate is totally unnecessary for sheet work or any furniture making.

    In fact, you DONT want a centered placement (which may still be off a tad) because you couldn't tell by sight if the mating pieces are properly oriented.

    The advice given above regarding going by the reference edge is sound and is the only solution one needs.

    Simon
    Last edited by Simon MacGowen; 01-27-2018 at 4:39 PM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simon MacGowen View Post
    Centered placements are BAD!

    Frankly, I read that article when it first came out and my immediate conclusion was that Tim created a solution to a problem that did not exist. If his solution was indeed a practical one, many vendors would start making a commercial version of his.

    I started using the DF500 and later the XL as well almost since Day 1 they were released and I work with both scales of measurements. Never one time did I have to worry about centering any domino placements.

    People jump on gadgets all the time and there are many after-the-market Festool gadgets that people love. Trust me, the dominoplate is totally unnecessary for sheet work or any furniture making.

    In fact, you DONT want a centered placement (which may still be off a tad) because you couldn't tell by sight if the mating pieces are properly oriented.

    The advice given above regarding going by the reference edge is sound and is the only solution one needs.

    Simon
    You're right, I was over thinking it. My mind likes things to be organized and setup properly, but once the joint's assembled, no one will ever know if it's slightly off inside.

    Jason

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simon MacGowen View Post

    In fact, you DONT want a centered placement (which may still be off a tad) because you couldn't tell by sight if the mating pieces are properly oriented.

    The advice given above regarding going by the reference edge is sound and is the only solution one needs.

    Simon
    ^ Excellent point to have made. A visual off center is very useful and will save you from making mistakes through a glue up of your assemblies. ALSO - if and when you are setting shelves, keeping more of the thickness on the top makes a stronger shelf as regards its load capacity. The important objective with the Domino, or biscuits, is to reference the respective faces.
    "... for when we become in heart completely poor, we at once are the treasurers & disbursers of enormous riches."
    WQJudge

  12. #12
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    I agree that an asymmetric domino placement can help insure that the face you wanted to show is the one that shows..assuming, of course, that you used the "correct" reference surfaces. LOL (IE...."stuff" happens )
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  13. #13
    As a Canadian old enough to start off in Imperial and then have to take on metric I can tell you that 10 mm is close to 3/8". 1 mm equals .040". Dead centre of whatever is only an idea, it won't make great wooden joints and in some cases may not even be a useful objective.

  14. #14
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    Three comments:
    - I've never seen a perfect 3/4" anything, so trying to have a tool set to perfectly center on 3/4" doesn't seem useful. Getting something close to center is the general goal, and tracking reference surfaces is very important.
    - I do have and like the Seneca Domiplate you mentioned. Primarily because it works well ergonomically.
    - if worrying about metric conversions, don't forget the plunge depth / domino length is in the mix, too.

    Matt

  15. #15
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    All those that say centering doesnít matter are correct. It only matters in the userís mind. The Domino works off the reference face the fence is sitting on to cut the slot. So as long as you reference and mark everything correctly to begin with the result will be perfect every time. Iím sure the jig in FWW works well. Itís just not necessary. You use Domino tenons glued togetether as spacers to get the height you want. Flow enough to center every time.

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