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Thread: The "Ultimate Tabletop Machine" for Woodworkers

  1. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Campbell View Post
    Now that all the Technical stuff is over, does anyone have something on their wish list that we missed?
    Well yeah Gary, one last thing. How can one get a $50K machine for $25K? New with warranty, tech support and a private guru?

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Canton, MI
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    514
    A big, red spindle on light mounted on the gantry. I can't hear it with DC and vac turned on and I don't really know if it's on until I take the dust boot off. I know it should be off when it's ready for a bit change, but that really may not look any different than someone pausing the machine.

    DC and vacuum pressure switch inputs to pause and ask you if you want them on before running a file.

    Light or horn to let me know when the file is complete so I can get my butt back over to the machine and unload it.

    You know, stuff to save me from me.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Marquette, MI USA
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    432
    James...
    All of those making the machine "idiot proof" options are relatively easy to do with most controls. Its sometimes harder to find the lights and horns that you like. I don't know what control you are using, but the ones I am familiar with that use a manual tool change system have a prominent message: CHANGE TO TOOL # PRESS ENTER WHEN COMPLETE

    Since there is no way that something considered "ultimate" would be without one, I will be using ATC spindles on these machines, so there is never a pause waiting on an operator input.


    2030 ATC.JPG
    Gary Campbell
    CNC Technology & Training

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Gary, I watched one of your videos last night that used the small machine with the four-tool ATC...very kewel. I can see how that is a very desirable feature for a small-format CNC that is getting "real work" and it's also hands-off which increases safety.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Marquette, MI USA
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    432
    Jim...
    The"real work" aspect is what I am after. The safety, is built in. The sign shop that bought that machine increased the number of signs they process per day from 8-10 to over 25 in 2 hours less per day. Since the machine holds multiple signs in fixtures, the operator is freed up from babysitting blank changes, bit changes and rezeroing, and gets to now spend much more time on ancillary operations like sanding, finishing and packing.
    Gary Campbell
    CNC Technology & Training

  6. #66
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    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Not that I'd likely be in a position to ever do it, but I"m curious if an ATC system like that is something that could be retrofitted to existing commercial machines without jumping though flaming hoops...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    Marquette, MI USA
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    Of course it can
    Gary Campbell
    CNC Technology & Training

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Elizabeth, CO
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    116
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Not that I'd likely be in a position to ever do it, but I"m curious if an ATC system like that is something that could be retrofitted to existing commercial machines without jumping though flaming hoops...
    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Campbell View Post
    Of course it can
    Gary may be able to, but this may not be a trivial exercise. If it is an ATC supported by your CNC builder, they can probably support it and provide the required changes. If it is a third party one you buy and want added, you will likely need to hire an expert like Gary to integrate, calibrate and update your control system to make it usable. Besides the mechanical changes, macros and tool tables will probably need updating, some changes to post processors may be required as well. If it is to be done, itís worth investing in having it done right. There is a reason for the substantial cost difference when you buy a machine with an ATC as opposed to a single spindle.
    Last edited by Richard Gonzalez; 02-17-2018 at 1:35 AM.
    Colorado Woodworkers Guild
    Colorado CNC User Group

  9. #69
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    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Makes perfect sense, Richard.

    My only intentions right now is to learn how to even make one tool do my bidding once my machine is "born" and in my shop.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Iowa USA
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    3,371
    So what is the price point users are willing to pay for the Ultimate Tabletop machine? Hobbyist or Pro User doing Commercial?
    Retired Guy- Central Iowa. , LightObject 40w CO2 Laser and Chiller, MakerGear M2 3D Printer. Fine Line Automation 4x4 CNC Router- Mach4 ESS

  11. #71
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    Marquette, MI USA
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    432
    Bill...
    Was your question directed at me or the masses?
    Gary Campbell
    CNC Technology & Training

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Somewhere in the Land of Lincoln
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    979
    I'm learning a lot and I even understand some of it. While I haven't been involved in true machining in over 23 years I worked as a tool and die maker/machinist for 19 years. I had some machining center experience at the end. So if I understand it correctly Gary if one applies gear reduction in your design it will greatly increase accuracy. Which in a hobbyist application would be a minor slow down in performance. I'm sure I will ask many dumb questions but bare with me. I do feel I'm skilled enough to construct my own system. I am capable of fabrication and design with expert guidance from those who know. Love your system Richard. Looks excellent. Keep posting and I will keep reading. I'm not ready to embark on this for a while. Not to say I wouldn't pick up some components if the price were right but I don't have my new shop even close to finished yet. So this is very early planning stages. Thanks for sharing your knowledge with the unknowing.

  13. #73
    Join Date
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    Iowa USA
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    It was a question for the Forum in general. There are two, maybe three types of users on here. I do not use my router as yet for a profit maker but as a hobby. My money making is in the lasers. Would I pay $8,000 - $12,000 for a table top, no.
    Retired Guy- Central Iowa. , LightObject 40w CO2 Laser and Chiller, MakerGear M2 3D Printer. Fine Line Automation 4x4 CNC Router- Mach4 ESS

  14. #74
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    That's pretty much the typical cost range for the more industrial built table tops now, Bill.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #75
    As a person who has been involved in the hobby CNC movement for a while, and is currently employed by a company making hobby CNC routers, I'll note that there hasn't been a real shakeout or coalescing of machines into easily differentiated classes / groupings --- there's a lot of overlap for the hobby stuff, and a very wide range of pricing.

    One interesting development has been the turnkey enclosed machines such as the Carbide 3D Nomad and Inventables Carvey (which are more CNC routers than the mills which they are often referred to as).

    That said, a number of machines have gone away, and I don't know that things will get much neater --- physics are inexorable, though it will be interesting to see new developments, and I think there are a couple of obvious features which will make for some interesting changes and capabilities for hobby machines.

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