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Thread: Titebond glue

  1. #1
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    Titebond glue

    I am in Massachusetts with recent temperatures below zero for an extender period my Titebond III has frozen solid. Since I will be buying new glue I am looking for some advice on which would be best for Maple to Cherry for hiding glue lines. Titebond II or III. Thanks in advance, Kevin

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    The glue that I've actually seen dry the most clear is Gorilla Wood Glue (not the expanding Original type). You may want to pick up a small bottle and try it on some scrap pieces. HTH.

  3. #3
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    According to Titebond your glue should handle up to around 5 freeze/thaw cycles.

  4. #4
    Unless moisture and working times are considerations I would go with Titebond original. Cheaper and clean joints if properly clamped. Clean gluelines are more about proper application and clamping than color of the glue.

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  5. #5
    Gosh, I was just looking at some pics of up your way - whew!

    I use Tb III for some cutting boards and mouse pads (good use of scraps). I glue multiple types of wood together. I don't see any glue lines. Now, I am finishing a mahogany table that is a glue up and while I don't see any glue lines on the faces, but they show up on the end grain. Interesting.

    Tony

  6. #6
    My Tite-Bond has frozen solid a couple of times, it still does what it's supposed to do without issue. I have glue-ups that are over ten years old, and there's been no delamination or joint failure of any type. Still, I now make it a point to bring all liquids that can freeze, into the house for winter months.
    Len

  7. #7
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    Titebond III will leave a darker glue line. The advantage is the glue is water resistant.

    Titebond I and II are essentially the same color and either will be ideal for your application.

    Titebond II is best for end-grain joints. It is my preference, but they all work great.

    If you are gluing pieces for turning, make sure the grain is all going the same direction. It also helps (structurally and aesthetically) if you keep the end grain growth rings curving the same direction. I call them smiles and frowns and you should make sure the pieces match.

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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
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    I do a lot with maple and cherry combinations and have used both TB2 and 3. 3 is closer to the tone of cherry, 2 is closer to maple, both seem to work pretty well. If the gaps in my joints are big enough that I can tell what color the glue is I figure I have other problems to deal with.

  9. #9
    Kevin,
    I have started using the titebond Translucent it dries clear. I have found it at Menards. I have used all of them and have found that III discolors my joints of the semented cherry bowls after a few year.

  10. #10
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    Remember Titebond is basically a modified alphaic? glue and only has strength when clamped to real pressure. Not a matter of visibility but chemical reactions in the wood. Gorilla glues test at i/2 the strength of all other wood glues. Epoxy and CA glues can be just placed between 2 pieces of wood with no clamping if wanted.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by roger wiegand View Post
    If the gaps in my joints are big enough that I can tell what color the glue is I figure I have other problems to deal with.
    +1 to that. In any case, I use original..... Well, 3 now, since I can get it at work.

  12. #12
    This may be helpful -
    Attached Images Attached Images

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  13. #13
    Join Date
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    These numbers strongly suggest testing by "Titeboond" company. The very extensive university tests by Fine Woodworking magazine show completely different results and using different brands, joint tightness, clamp pressures ect in their tests 4-5 years ago. Might be more non-biased perhaps?

  14. #14
    Robert, the chart is straight off the Titebond website, so I would assume it is their testing. I posted it not to support the contents, but more to the OP’s query regarding color and to the other comments about moisture and set time. I don’t recall any questions about strength.

    Apparently, Titebond was the overall best in the FWW test and they link the test article on the Titebond site - http://www.titebond.com/Libraries/Ne..._FWW.sflb.ashx
    Last edited by John Keeton; 01-09-2018 at 11:01 PM.

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  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
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    Thanks for all the replies, I went with Titebond III. If the project comes out as planned I will post some photos.

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