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Thread: DP735 Planer End Effects

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    2,484
    Snipe on those planers is completely hit and miss. Some can be cured with board support, others will snipe regardless of what you do.

    True snipe has nothing to do with board support at all. It has to do with flexure in the head. The board enters the planer and the infeed side of the head rocks up slightly under load (taking slack/backlash out of the posts), then on the outfeed end the reverse happens. Hence your issues on both ends of the work. Even large commercial planers often can suffer from snipe and no amount of board support or lifting the in-feed or out-feed side of the board will make an ounce of difference.

    We ran thousands of feet of material through a 735 that we had as a job site planer. You could lift up on the infeed board so much that you would raise the planer off the table, and then move the outfeed side and do the same, and you would still have snipe. You could bolt the planer to the table so you couldnt lift the planer at all and you could put as much upward lift on the in and out feed as you wanted and you would still get snipe.

    The reason it happened regardless of supporting, or excessively raising, the in and out feed side of the board is because its simply flexure in the head.

    Some 735's have a lot. Some have a little, some have none, and some have so little that its minimized enough that with additional support (in and outfeed tables) its acceptable.

    The answer is to just plan the loss into your project. A planer is a roughing tool. Its not meant to leave you a finished surface. Some people who may not suffer from snipe may take 1/64" passes or less (very light).

    Use your planer for what it is. A roughing tool. Be honest with yourself that your knives will be perfect for one board and one board only then you will see nicks, and defects in your surface that will require sanding. Swap your knives often to avioid burnishing which will haunt you in finishing especially if you use waterborne finishes.

    Just my .02
    Sometimes I just want to look at pretty pictures,... Thats when I go to the Turners Forum

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
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    1,152
    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Decker View Post
    In that case, you'll soon appreciate your drum sander even more, as it deals with snipe removal very quickly. The snipe on my planer is rarely more than a few thousandths. Couple of passes through the sander, snipe be gone.
    Yeah, not overly worried. Just bought the feed tables.

  3. #18
    <p>
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Bolton View Post
    The reason it happened regardless of supporting, or excessively raising, the in and out feed side of the board is because its simply flexure in the head. Some 735's have a lot. Some have a little, some have none, and some have so little that its minimized enough that with additional support (in and outfeed tables) its acceptable. The answer is to just plan the loss into your project.
    Mark is so right here I can't stand it, (lol) The length of the lost wood is 2.5 to 3&quot; on each end on my portable planers. You can use a part that has some sap wood or sometning else you don't want in you finished project to get cut off. The ends of the board probably have hairline cracks etc. that you will cut off to square the piece many times any way. When gluing pieces for a panel offsetting the pieces reduces waste by 50%. I just don't see how the cost of the cutoffs can ever justify the cost of heliptical cutters except in a high production environment. (and you might end up with snipe any way) I have a dry sink that I made 20 years ago that I thought I sanded the snipe out, but in the right light I still see it............cut it off and use it to smoke your pork roast........you will be a happy man! My 2 cents. Ron</p>
    Last edited by Ron Citerone; 01-08-2018 at 7:56 PM.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Posts
    1,152
    Lol. As an afterthought, I went back to the seller and bought two routers (bosch 2 3/4 hp, PC 891, full kits), some bits, a router table, some wood, and a DW364 circular saw. All tools were light use. I've sold all of that (except circular saw), and now I got my planer down to $250. If I sell the saw, I'll have it down to $125. A bargain!

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
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    1,152
    Even if it’s ill advised, at this price point , I’ll probably get the spiral head in a month or so. I think with the kind of work I do on guitars, it will be a good thing.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Fallbrook, California
    Posts
    3,540
    The extension tables will help with the snipe on the DW 735. I’ve also found that running it on the slow speed helps.
    Don Bullock
    Woebgon Bassets
    AKC Championss

    The man who makes no mistakes does not usually make anything.
    -- Edward John Phelps

  7. #22
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    On Canada
    Posts
    68
    I do what Don says , Run it on the slow speed with the extension tables and the extension tables up about the thickness of a dime . I do have a Bryd head in mine and there is no snipe to speak of on it

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Ottawa, ON Canada
    Posts
    1,051
    Mike: If you do go with the spiral head, do it for reasons of finish, not snipe. The spiral head will do nothing for the snip issue with the 735.
    Grant
    Ottawa ON

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Mansfield TX
    Posts
    1
    Slightly lift the leading board as it enters the machine until both rollers are engaged and lift the last board as it exits. For smaller stock, overlap the boards by a few inches (assuming they are less than half the width of the machine). This helps even out the wear on the blades as well.

    Take a much smaller cut on the final pass. (1/4 turn of wheel)

    For wider stock or laziest sake I sometimes just add ~4" to both ends for waste and not bother with the techniques above.

  10. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike OMelia View Post
    Even if itís ill advised, at this price point , Iíll probably get the spiral head in a month or so. I think with the kind of work I do on guitars, it will be a good thing.
    Absolutely if you work on any kind of figured wood at all.

  11. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Grant Wilkinson View Post
    Mike: If you do go with the spiral head, do it for reasons of finish, not snipe. The spiral head will do nothing for the snip issue with the 735.
    But finish with figured woods, yes...

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    Huntsville, AL
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Bullock View Post
    The extension tables will help with the snipe on the DW 735. Iíve also found that running it on the slow speed helps.
    There is a speed control?

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Providence, RI
    Posts
    169
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike OMelia View Post
    There is a speed control?
    Two speeds. There's a lever on the left side on the front - be sure the planer is running whenever you flip it.
    -- Jim

    Mr. Natural sez, "Use the right tool for the job."

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Posts
    1,152
    Feeling rather proud of myself. The guy who sold me the planer also sold me a bunch of other tools. Routers, saws, etc. I finally got all that stuff resold. Total cost of planer to me was $125. So, I bought some feed tables, and put lockable casters on the base he gave me. So I’m up to $200. Guess I’ll hold off on the head. Get some experience with it as is. Thanks for the advice.

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Northern Illinois
    Posts
    184
    I have owned the DW735 for a number of years and essentially eliminate visible snipe by raising the Dewalt infeed and outfeed tables slightly at the outer edges; maybe 1/32" to 1/16". Occasionally I still put some boards through that do show noticeable snipe, but that is not common with the tables adjusted as indicated. I know the temptation is to take as much off as possible on each pass, but it is, after all, not a commercial duty planer. Therefore, I limit the depth of cut on each pass to 1/32". Takes longer to get a piece of lumber to thickness, but the result is much better. Wood is just too expensive to add 6" - 8" to each board to cut the snipe off and, sometimes it isn't possible with the board lengths available.

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