Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 19

Thread: An inexpensive dust bucket saw dust level sensor new cheaper parts

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Abilene, TX
    Posts
    89

    An inexpensive dust bucket saw dust level sensor new cheaper parts

    I wanted a saw dust level detector and on SMC I found thread about building the Oneida Dust Centry Clone
    I found the Banner qs18vp6d sensor on eBay for $28.00 so I ordered one from China yes it arrived about a month latter. But I could have purchased one from a US supplier north of $150.00 an ungodly price.
    google the sensor. Banner qs18vp6d.
    I had a power cube at 12 VDC, and I found a LED strobe light for $3.00 on eBay another item shipped by backward sailing sail boat to the US. I wired it up using this schematic found on the above mentioned
    IMG_0104.jpgThanks to Ben Rivel,

    http://www.sawmillcreek.org/member.php?151774-Ben-Rivel

    This works like a champ and pretty cheap depending on where you purchase your parts.

    The less expensive sensor that works just as well!
    You want to search for
    E3F-DS30C1

    I found it for $4.10 at
    http://www.icstation.com/mobile/ds30...or-p-7079.html

    I wired it up just like the Banner qs18vp6d sensor I placed this one in my 5 gallon dust bucket with my home made Cyclone and a shop vac. Just like my D.C. System I wired it for sound by using and old smoke detector they have very loud sonalerts in case you don't see the strobe.
    feel feel free to PM me if you want more details.

    What a great place to learn how to do things! Thanks Al!

    Lane

    yea like Al Gore invented the internet!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Crown Point, Indiana
    Posts
    1,994
    Very interesting....could you post a couple more pictures showing how you placed the sensor.

    I need to build one for my dust collector and your post will help.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    1,578
    Good find on an alternate sensor! I knew there were others out there but I didnt include them in my thread on the Oneida build as I only meant to show what parts were use to build one like the Dust Sentry. Im sure there are quite a few different sensors out there that would work just fine.
    If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Abilene, TX
    Posts
    89
    Larry this sensor is very simple to mount unlike the Banner,
    this sensor all you need to do is drill a whole and two ring nuts come on the sensor.
    sandwhick the sensor nut between the top of the dust bucket and screwon the bottom nut.
    the Banner is a little different because there are two flat spots on the side of the cylinder that must be plugged up to prevent an air leak.

    IMG_0170.jpg

    Let me know if you need more details
    Lane

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Abilene, TX
    Posts
    89
    Dust Level sensor on the Cheap! Less than $10.00
    This might get a bit long, Sorry if it does seem that way.
    Parts:

    E3F-DS30C4 Photoelectric sensor. $4.10
    http://www.icstation.com/mobile/ds30c4-photoelectric-switch-adjustable-sensor-p-7079.html

    Harbor Freight light Hft® - Item#67227 (optional) free with Coupon.
    power supply 12 VDC power cube or 9 volt battery (I am testing how long the 9 volt battery will work no data at this time.)

    The big picture, I am cheap so I wanted to use what I had on hand.
    I decided to use the Harbor Freight light since I had several sitting around the light will turn on when the level sensor is tripped
    to modify the HF light I opened it up and found the on off switch and by passed the switch with a vey simple jumper see photo below
    I also removed the batteries as they will not be needed only the power cube or a 9 volt battery will be the power supply.

    Wiring the sensor to the HFT light is pretty straightforward.

    if you need further details contact me.

    have fun

    Lane






    E3F-DS30C4 Photoelectric sensor.
    Parameters:
    [Name]: infrared photoelectric switch
    [Model] : E3F-DS30C4
    [Model] may substitution : E3F-DS30N1 E3F-DS30C1 E18-DS30NA
    [Overall ] : M18mm*75mm cylinder
    [Detection method: diffuse type
    [Output state ] : NPN normally open three-wire
    [Operating voltage ] : 10-36VDC
    [Output Current ] : 200-300mA
    [Detection distance ] : 10-30cm adjustable
    [Detectable object ]: translucent or opaque objects
    [Response Time ] : <2.5ms
    [Case Material ] : ABS plastic




    Blue = ground -
    Brown = Vcc + 10-30 DC
    Black= output or switched relative to Brown




    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Lee Schierer; 01-07-2018 at 7:21 AM. Reason: Font too large

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Abilene, TX
    Posts
    89

    Photo did not post


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Abilene, TX
    Posts
    89
    This is drawing should have been in the last post for the Dust Level Sensor project

    IMG_0176.jpg

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    5,914

    sensor position?

    Nice job, Lane.

    For those who may have different DC hardware and are not familiar with your specific dust collector and vac/bucket setup could you sketch or describe where you mounted the optoelectronic switch? For example is it in the side or lid of the bucket/bin, aimed across or straight down? This might save some confusion. Thanks.

    this sensor all you need to do is drill a whole and two ring nuts come on the sensor.
    sandwhick the sensor nut between the top of the dust bucket and screwon the bottom nut.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Abilene, TX
    Posts
    89
    This is the sensor on my home grown Cyclone with a Shop Vac.
    The first photo is the top of the dust bucket with the senor pointing down mounted into 3/4 MDF.
    There is a potentiometer on the top of sensor to adjust the depth of the trigger point, adjustable from 10- 30 CM
    this is works very well with a 5 gallon bucket. Presently it is powered by a 9 volt battery.
    Saddly the 9 volt battery is the most costly item in the build.
    The knob beside the sensor is a photo cell test device that moves at paddle over the sensor and this test the circuit.
    I used a 1/4 - 20 carriage bolt to act as a shaft for the paddle and the knob. I drilled and tapped the MDF to create
    tight seal and not have a source for a vacuum leak.
    IMG_0180.jpg


    The underside:

    IMG_0181.jpg

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    5,914
    Quote Originally Posted by Lane Hardy View Post
    Presently it is powered by a 9 volt battery.
    Saddly the 9 volt battery is the most costly item in the build.
    ...
    If you want to run it permanently on batteries consider that one D cell can have 30 times the capacity of a nine volt battery so six D cells in series will give you 9 volts and last 180 time as long as a nine volt battery. I'd run wires though and plug it into the wall. If no 110v outlet is nearby, two low voltage wires could carry the power from the wall wart.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    1,578
    Im surprised that sensor will even run on a 9V battery (which will actually output less) when the datasheet lists the power supply voltage at 10-30VDC (LINK, Page 6)
    Last edited by Ben Rivel; 01-08-2018 at 4:14 PM.
    If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    5,914
    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Rivel View Post
    Im surprised that sensor will even run on a 9V battery (which will actually output less) when the datasheet lists the power supply voltage at 10-30VDC
    Published specs are sometimes optimum or target values instead of requirements so I'm not too surprised. I've tested things that were listed, for example, for 12vdc that worked fine on 9v and even "worked" so some extent down to about 2 volts. The actual useful range depends on the design of the circuits, the internal voltage regulation, and perhaps the function and even the operating temperature. Maybe it works on 9v but would work better or use less current at 12 or 15v, can't guess.

    Those do look like very useful sensors to have on hand, I might get some to play with.

    BTW, I like your avatar pic. Did you create that?

    JKJ

  13. #13
    My banner sensor runs fine off of a 9v power supply. That's all I had on hand, and it works fine.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    1,578
    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    BTW, I like your avatar pic. Did you create that?

    JKJ
    Nope. Ryan Bliss did back in 2000. His website is DigitalBlasphemy.com
    If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    527
    I like high tech and all that, but for the chip collector that precedes my dust collector, I simply put a lexan window in the door so I can see how full the trash can is, and this works brilliantly for me.

    Simple, low tech, no batteries to replace, no electronic failures expected...

    Bill
    Too much to do...Not enough time...life is too short!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •