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Thread: 20x28 workshop build

  1. #106
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Prairie Village, KS
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    255
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I agree. This is one job that DIY is arduous. The pros are FAST and since mud work is an "art form", the fact that they do it daily makes for a better end result. In the scope of things, they don't really charge all that much for the work, either, compared to the heavy labor involved to DIY.
    I can handle the hanging part (although I've yet to deal with a ceiling) but the mudding and finishing part is just not worth my time. I am terrible at it and a pro will finish it 10 times faster than I could hope for.

  2. #107
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    Jul 2017
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    Prairie Village, KS
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Crawford View Post
    Been a while since I updated, still painting and trimming as I have time. Painting primer + two coats of paint on everything takes way longer than I anticipated.

    The minisplit is AWESOME.

    Lots of lights to still install.

    Putting a chair rail on the wall, so that's why the paint line is a little jagged.











    Great looking shop, man. I cant wait for the day I am able to build one just for me. I have a severe case of shop envy right now.

  3. #108
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    46,155
    Tom, your shop is looking great! And I agree about the MiniSpit. Mine has also been "awesome" in every way.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #109
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    Jul 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Tom, your shop is looking great! And I agree about the MiniSpit. Mine has also been "awesome" in every way.
    Mine too. So glad I took the plunge. Now if I could just insulate my ceiling.

  5. #110
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    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim M Tuttle View Post
    Mine too. So glad I took the plunge. Now if I could just insulate my ceiling.
    Yea, your install was the 'final nail" that got me to do my system. As to your ceiling...you could do it by installing a drop ceiling that will support some insulation. The panels would seriously impact noise levels, too...my shop is like a "house of quiet" when I walk in there now with the tiles up there. Even the tunes sound a lot better!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #111
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Prairie Village, KS
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Yea, your install was the 'final nail" that got me to do my system. As to your ceiling...you could do it by installing a drop ceiling that will support some insulation. The panels would seriously impact noise levels, too...my shop is like a "house of quiet" when I walk in there now with the tiles up there. Even the tunes sound a lot better!
    I only have 9 foot ceilings in my garage and they are sagging severely. My big fall projects will include ripping out the ceiling, fixing the sagging joists, redoing the ceiling with the attic access and then insulating. When I added my subpanel I did everything in conduit and it's starting to get annoying having it all over the walls so I might rewire the whole thing again as well.

  7. #112
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    central tx
    Posts
    174
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Yea, your install was the 'final nail" that got me to do my system. As to your ceiling...you could do it by installing a drop ceiling that will support some insulation. The panels would seriously impact noise levels, too...my shop is like a "house of quiet" when I walk in there now with the tiles up there. Even the tunes sound a lot better!
    I'm considering adding some drop acoustic panels on the ceiling between some of the lights, I think it will cut down on the echo and the music will sound better as you said.

  8. #113
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    Mar 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim M Tuttle View Post
    I only have 9 foot ceilings in my garage and they are sagging severely. My big fall projects will include ripping out the ceiling, fixing the sagging joists, redoing the ceiling with the attic access and then insulating. When I added my subpanel I did everything in conduit and it's starting to get annoying having it all over the walls so I might rewire the whole thing again as well.
    That sounds like a really good long-term solution, Tim. Messy work, but worthwhile. I have a little more area in my shop to complete my ceiling as well as some building to do upstairs to create some more conditioned space for certain operations myself...once it's not deathly hot up there!

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Crawford View Post
    I'm considering adding some drop acoustic panels on the ceiling between some of the lights, I think it will cut down on the echo and the music will sound better as you said.
    They can make a big difference, Thomas. Use acoustic panels to face the work area and for suspended noise mitigation, mount some foam or other absorbent material on the back/top side of the panels to help reduce "bounce". This is a technique often used in restaurants that have too many hard surfaces with resulting noise levels that are uncomfortable for guests.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #114
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    central tx
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    Looking at something like this for the panels, except not as pretty since its a workshop:

    http://acousticsfreq.com/how-to-buil...oustic-panels/

  10. #115
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    LA & SC neither one is Cali
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Crawford View Post
    Looking at something like this for the panels, except not as pretty since its a workshop:

    http://acousticsfreq.com/how-to-buil...oustic-panels/
    Those work great for frequencies above about 200hz or the Schroeder frequency of the room whichever is higher. Note you want to use compressed fiberglass or rockwool, not the fluffy stuff. Owens Corning 703 or Roxul Safe n Sound are two popular choices. They come in rigid sheets and the thicker you go the lower frequencies they will absorb but for general use in a shop 3" should suffice. Be aware you need to use cloth that is as transparent to sound as possible many fabrics reflect a lot of sound and this will significantly reduce the efficacy of the absorbers. Guilford of Maine FR 701 is a standard relatively inexpensive option (often referred to in HT circles/forums as GOM). You can get custom pictures and prints on fabric from a couple of sources like Spoonflower but that is more a home theater or studio kinda thing but if you want to have pictures of trees etc, I can give you links for the proper materials and how to order them for this application if you want to go all interior designer in your shop.
    5,306 miles from where the greatest things with 4 wheels are born
    5,328 miles from where the greatest things with 2 wheels are born
    5,301 miles from where the greatest things with 2 wheels and a band are born
    Seems to be more than a coincidence to me...

  11. #116
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    central tx
    Posts
    174
    Quote Originally Posted by Van Huskey View Post
    Those work great for frequencies above about 200hz or the Schroeder frequency of the room whichever is higher. Note you want to use compressed fiberglass or rockwool, not the fluffy stuff. Owens Corning 703 or Roxul Safe n Sound are two popular choices. They come in rigid sheets and the thicker you go the lower frequencies they will absorb but for general use in a shop 3" should suffice. Be aware you need to use cloth that is as transparent to sound as possible many fabrics reflect a lot of sound and this will significantly reduce the efficacy of the absorbers. Guilford of Maine FR 701 is a standard relatively inexpensive option (often referred to in HT circles/forums as GOM). You can get custom pictures and prints on fabric from a couple of sources like Spoonflower but that is more a home theater or studio kinda thing but if you want to have pictures of trees etc, I can give you links for the proper materials and how to order them for this application if you want to go all interior designer in your shop.
    I'd be interested in the links, I'm not afraid to make it pretty.

  12. #117
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    LA & SC neither one is Cali
    Posts
    8,881
    If you have some time:

    https://www.avsforum.com/forum/19-de...els-cheap.html

    Be aware it is a somewhat active thread with 3700+ posts and near 400K views. The first post is a good build post and gets you started with the idea of using some of the custom fabric printers like Spoonflower. Be aware you can just go to Spoonflower and pick a design that you like and use it, there are thousands. The thread is mostly about movie posters and things like getting the proper DPI and tips on how to clean up images and remove text from posters etc. If you were interested you could upload and have pictures of machines, company names, warning signs, shop rules etc etc printed. HT guys do it because it looks good in the theater and companies charge big money for acoustic panels with even non-custom art on them.
    5,306 miles from where the greatest things with 4 wheels are born
    5,328 miles from where the greatest things with 2 wheels are born
    5,301 miles from where the greatest things with 2 wheels and a band are born
    Seems to be more than a coincidence to me...

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