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Thread: 20x28 workshop build

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    central tx
    Posts
    137

    20x28 workshop build

    HOA approved yesterday, tentative start date right after the new year. I've had a couple other threads in here but I'll use this one for all the build pics.

    Details:

    20'x28' (560 sq ft for the mathematically challenged)
    10' sidewalls
    vaulted hip roof
    lots of natural light
    concrete floors
    sprayfoam insulation
    mini-split HVAC/heat pump

    The double doors are facing straight north:




  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Vail, AZ
    Posts
    108
    Looks nice. This past year I built a freestanding workshop, 24' x 32' with 10' walls. I did two things you might wish to consider: depending upon your style of work, windows that extend that far down will rob you of wall space which in a small shop is always at a premium. I used smaller windows that are fixed (don't open) up high to be able to utilize the walls below. They are also better for security to keep prying eyes away. The other thing is to consider resale value and position your large door as a "garage" door to have the building function as a garage for a non-woodworker buyer. You will really like your minisplit and spray foam insulation. Mine keeps the shop very comfortable year 'round even with 110 degree Arizona summers.
    Good luck. Keep us posted.
    Ed

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
    Posts
    509
    You don't have to put a garage door in but you could frame in the header so it could be done later with minimal effort. One from the middle window to the slider would be easily enough for a car door and possibly a man door too.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Vail, AZ
    Posts
    108
    The Sketchup rendering by the OP suggests the exterior would be brick. If so, the opening is best served to be the size of an overhead door so as not to cut/remove brick. Depending upon the climate, an insulated overhead door seals well and is an easy access for machines and lumber. One can also simply omit the door and use a single or double man door with wood framing for the rest of the surround.
    Ed

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    45,189
    The double doors can be used for machinery and materials...there's no need for a garage door or prep for one. That's what I use in my shop. And not show here, but shown in another thread, he has a pool table on one side of the space.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,426
    When installing double door there is no need for them to be equal width. I have seen installations with one standard 3' wide door mated with a custom 4' wide door. The 3' door is the primary door. On my shop the doors are all mounted to open outwards for more room. I used special full length aluminum hinges. I inlet angle iron at the jamb. for the deadbolts to go into.
    I wish I knew what to call those kind of hinges.
    Bill D.

    On edit: I got mine at habitat for about $10 each.
    https://www.stanleyhinges.com/Contin...inges-cat.aspx

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    45,189
    I special ordered insulated steel, double outward swing doors for my shop so I could have bigger access than the normal "people door" without dealing with a garage type door. I wanted that utility and didn't want to have to deal with trying to seal up some form of overhead door. The out-swing doors have special security hinges and with the combination of a dead-bold and heavy latch bolts that go into the floor and into the header, they are pretty secure. That same method can serve if one side is used as a standard people door, whether in-swing or out-swing.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    central tx
    Posts
    137
    Per the HOA I can't have a garage door facing the road in my section, its basically a free-standing "addition" to the house. So it has to be brick, matching roof line, etc.

    I'm also planning on having the doors swing outward to maximize the interior. They face the back patio which I have some future plans to reinvigorate so it should tie in nicely as a single space.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    central tx
    Posts
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    One stipulation of building the shop is for it to double as a bit of a game room, hence the pool table Jim mentioned. I think if I build a nice plywood hard cover for it it can be used as an assembly table, or at least a place to do finishing and stack material on.


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
    Posts
    509
    A dart board will take up less space.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Loudonville, NY
    Posts
    511
    It looks like it will be a nice space. I built a 16'x28' shop with 9'ceilings. While resale is certainly important for those of us in neighborhoods, and a lot of natural light is good, I will say that big windows take away from valuable wall space. The swing out double doors are nice to have. Just make sure the wind can't fling them open! And I do have a dartboard! If you rip long things on the table saw, make sure there is room on both sides. Having it closer to the doors can help.

    Here is a link to my shop: http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthre...ing&highlight=
    You see that it quickly fills up!

    Good luck.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    central tx
    Posts
    137
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Stolicky View Post
    It looks like it will be a nice space. I built a 16'x28' shop with 9'ceilings. While resale is certainly important for those of us in neighborhoods, and a lot of natural light is good, I will say that big windows take away from valuable wall space. The swing out double doors are nice to have. Just make sure the wind can't fling them open! And I do have a dartboard! If you rip long things on the table saw, make sure there is room on both sides. Having it closer to the doors can help.

    Here is a link to my shop: http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthre...ing&highlight=
    You see that it quickly fills up!

    Good luck.
    Your shop looks great. Are you glad you put the DC in the closet?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,426
    If the windows are low enough they can be opened to allow extra long pieces of wood to be pushed through the saw and out the window.
    Bil lD

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Loudonville, NY
    Posts
    511
    Thank you. It was a compilation of years of learning/reading/planning/economics to make it happen. I am glad I put the DC in the closet. It is still pretty loud, but not nearly as bad. I only built the surround wall with 2x4s, and I think 2x6s with some more sound insulation would have been noticeably better. Good luck on your build. I made the shop build a 'woodworking project' so I forced my (impatient) self to take my time and do things as 'right' as possible. That was the biggest challenge.
    Last edited by Chris Stolicky; 12-28-2017 at 12:19 PM. Reason: typos

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    central tx
    Posts
    137
    I'm considering whether or not to have a small loft for lumber storage on one end, but not sure if it will be worth it with the hip roof.

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