Page 3 of 8 FirstFirst 1234567 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 116

Thread: Table saw safety reminder

  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Kortge View Post
    With the apparent massive popularity of the GRR-RIPPER push block - which from what I understand requires removal of the blade guard to even work, I assume lots and lots of table saw users are working with the blade guards removed, if for no other reason than "for total hand protection" (that quote taken from the GRR-RIPPER website). Other sales sites say "Protect your hands like never before, virtually eliminate kickback".
    I can't speak for others who own a GRR push block. But I use it WITHOUT removing the dust blade guard, except for cuts that need the removal of the guard (e.g. on the cross cut sled) whether or not you have a GRR block. Another occasion in which you need to remove the guard is resaw thin strips, in which case the GRR push block excels when used with the riving knife. The only safer or as safe alternative is to use the bandsaw or plane it down with a thickness planer.

    I agree with the comment that this youtube content producer needs either a refresher or some proper safety training so that what he does when copied by his viewers will not result in any unintended consequences. Someone said he is getting a SAWSTOP, but that would protect him but not his viewers.

    There are always people who would say I have done this and that in the same way for 25 years and look, I still have ten fingers. That is not how shop safety is assessed. If anyone is interested in seeing actual and real life experience of tablesaw injuries, go to the SawStop site. There are also people who insist all you need to avoid shop injuries is already there between your eyes. I wish things were that simple.

    The youtube woodworking channels and videos are the WW West. Watcher beware is all I can say.

    Simon
    Last edited by Simon MacGowen; 12-06-2017 at 9:48 PM.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto Ontario
    Posts
    8,238
    Quote Originally Posted by Simon MacGowen View Post
    Another occasion in which you need to remove the guard is resaw thin strips, in which case the GRR push block excels when used with the riving knife. The only safer or as safe alternative is to use the bandsaw or plane it down with a thickness planer.



    .

    Simon
    Hi Simon, I saw thin strips using a low, short fence and a push block without removing the blade guard.....Regards, Rod.

  3. Saw it, he was an idiot and I told him so. That entire incident was entirely avoidable by using common sense work practices. There's no such thing as an accident in that case, he screwed up. Now it's great that he's trying to tell people how to avoid it, but the fact is, because he's on YouTube, he is going to be perceived as an expert by people who have less experience and are looking at him to teach them how to use power tools. Whether that's his intention or not, that's the fact. And because he is not using proper safety equipment and proper safety practices, how long is it going to be before someone watches him do something stupid, tries it themselves, and comes away with a much more serious injury?

    But yeah, he didn't want to hear that.
    Last edited by Brian Henderson; 12-06-2017 at 10:43 PM.

  4. Quote Originally Posted by Bob Coates View Post
    This guy attempts to create the kickback live, n harem to him done but very close in slow motion. As he says he was probably an idiot for trying this.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u7sRrC2Jpp4
    I have no idea where it is, but there was someone a year or two ago on YouTube who was demonstrating the power of kickbacks and he built an elaborate rig so he could safely launch wood with his blade. The boards shot half way across an open field behind his shop. Wish I could find the video again but it's out there.

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by Rod Sheridan View Post
    Hi Simon, I saw thin strips using a low, short fence and a push block without removing the blade guard.....Regards, Rod.
    Yes, short fence! Forgot that -- I once saw a European video in which the thin strip got pushed past the blade without the push stick hitting the guard/prawl.

    Simon

  6. #36
    So Tabitha Babbit gets credited with inventing the circular saw in 1813 and we have VLOGGERS in 2017 explaining how to use the tool safely after mangling themselves using the tool. And the show goes on, two centuries of progress, the blind leading the blind...

    I do not use a guard on my table/sliding saw. I have always used a splitter or riving knife however. Horrible injuries? Zero. Almost 30 years now...

    How on Earth do you get injured using a tablesaw? Intersection. Your body part being in the path of the blade. Remove the possibility of intersection, remove the potential for injury.

    Guards won't stop you from putting your body parts in the path of the blade, in fact they won't stop your body parts from coming in contact with the blade. I have actually used guards and had them deflect material into the blade causing problems.

    I'm not suggesting that you remove your guards if you use them, I am simply saying that I don't use one on my table/sliding saw and I have avoided injury by not putting my body in the path of the blade where intersection and injury can occur. In my shop, where accuracy is critical on various projects guards are an impediment. Understanding that you won't get cut if you don't touch the blade is your best guard. Splitters and riving knives are not optional. There, that's my 30 year effective line in the sand.
    Last edited by Chris Fournier; 12-06-2017 at 11:11 PM.

  7. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Pratt View Post
    It seems like it's only been in the last several years that people have been preaching (falsely, I believe) that the teeth should be just protruding above the stock. Having the gullets above the surface is the minimum as far as I'm concerned. And if using a guard, it can be much higher.
    People do that because it gives them a false sense of security or protection, thinking they can "get away" from the blade fast enough if the blade is "low" enough. What they miss is the blade is actually the exposed teeth PLUS the full thickness of the stock they are working with. So it is 1/2"+ or 3/4"+ spinning metal instead of the 1/8" they think they are dealing with. In any kickback encounter, it is violent and uncontrollable; even 1/2" exposed steel can maim mercilessly.

    Simon

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto Ontario
    Posts
    8,238
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Deakin View Post
    Good information Brian, thanks for posting that.

    Unfortunately most North American saws are decades behind in safety systems, all the decades or century old devices such as multi-function rip fences, crown guards, riving knives, Shaw guards and power feeders are conspicuously absent here.

    That said, we're a pretty creative group and can make many of these things ourselves, or purchase commercially available safety devices...........Regards, Rod.

  9. #39
    I watched the whole video.

    The guy seems humble and I feel badly for what happened and that he has a month of down time now.

    The consequences could have been much more severe and permanent.

    As a SawStop owner I watched and didnít feel any less need to be hyper vigilant and respect the TS. The blade brake isnít going to stop a kickback knockout shot, however, I canít help but to think how he would have been spared a month of recovery.

  10. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Van Cronk View Post
    As a SawStop owner I watched and didnít feel any less need to be hyper vigilant and respect the TS. The blade brake isnít going to stop a kickback knockout shot, however, I canít help but to think how he would have been spared a month of recovery.
    Triggering the blade brake -- whether or not due to a kickback -- can be costly financially, depending on the blade involved: $70+$135= a loss $200+loss of shop time until the replacement cartridge is received.

    I have yet to meet any SawStop owners who said they can let their guard a little down because of the extra protection.

    Simon

  11. Quote Originally Posted by Rod Sheridan View Post
    Although I'm very sorry to hear of the injuries, this is a guy who absolutely should not be producing safety videos.

    His lack of recognition of the most important aspect of safety when using machinery was evident.

    1) he removed the guard and riving knife/splitter. This is a firing offence in industry for good reason, any time you have to remove the guard, you're either doing something you shouldn't be doing, or you're using the wrong machine or guard.

    Yes, he had wrong hand position, blade height and lack of push devices, however having the riving knife and guard in place would have prevented the kickback and blade contact injuries.

    I'm not sure why it's so hard to understand that the safety devices should never be removed except for machine adjustment/tooling changes with the machine locked out.

    I guess it's because so few operators have had any training by qualified personnel.

    Regards, Rod.

    That's what I took away too. Essentially, his whole video could've been condensed to "Use a guard and splitter," yet he didn't even mention it. Hand position, push sticks, blade height, etc. are all very important, but he completely ignored the one piece of equipment that likely would've saved him even if he screwed everything else up.

  12. Quote Originally Posted by Simon MacGowen View Post
    Triggering the blade brake -- whether or not due to a kickback -- can be costly financially, depending on the blade involved: $70+$135= a loss $200+loss of shop time until the replacement cartridge is received.
    Iím not going to defend my decision to use SawStops in my shop, garage workshop and out in the field. My crew has only triggered the brakes when cutting wet pressure treated lumber. Happens maybe 1x every other month or so. I build the cost into my bids. Worth every penny (to me)

  13. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by Simon MacGowen View Post

    I have yet to meet any SawStop owners who said they can let their guard a little down because of the extra protection.

    Simon
    Makes sense-that would be akin to driving your vehicle recklessly because it it equipped with airbags.

  14. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Pratt View Post
    It seems like it's only been in the last several years that people have been preaching (falsely, I believe) that the teeth should be just protruding above the stock. Having the gullets above the surface is the minimum as far as I'm concerned. And if using a guard, it can be much higher.
    When I took shop in 9th grade that is what our shop teacher told us was the correct way to set up a saw. I used to do the same thing until I noticed that some rip cuts wanted to climb up the blade as I started cuts. I then read the manufacturers recommendations. I now hav my blade set so at least the gullets are clear of the wood or a bit higher.
    Lee Schierer - McKean, PA
    USNA- '71
    Captain USN(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Contribute

  15. #45
    Most hobbyists I know have the blade guard removed on their table saw. I dislike a blade guard myself. Gets in the way.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •