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Thread: Home made lathe

  1. #1

    Home made lathe

    I have been working with a young man building him a lathe. We finished yesterday and moved it to his shop. It is based on my home built machine (which is about 10 years old) with a couple of improvements. A friend donated most of the steel, another friend donated a spare Powermatic banjo. Other than banjo, motor, belt, bearings and inverter; we fabricated all the parts. 2 hp 3 ph motor, VFD, 22" swing, 35 inch max length, it weighs about 900 lbs. It is a major upgrade from the little machine that he learned on.
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    _______________________________________
    When failure is not an option
    Mediocre is assured.

  2. #2
    That is freaking awesome. What a nice thing to do and a seriously nice lathe.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Parrish View Post
    That is freaking awesome. What a nice thing to do and a seriously nice lathe.
    +1. What a great thing to do!

  4. #4
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    WOW , say's it all.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Ford View Post
    I have been working with a young man building him a lathe. We finished yesterday and moved it to his shop. It is based on my home built machine (which is about 10 years old) with a couple of improvements. A friend donated most of the steel, another friend donated a spare Powermatic banjo. Other than banjo, motor, belt, bearings and inverter; we fabricated all the parts. 2 hp 3 ph motor, VFD, 22" swing, 35 inch max length, it weighs about 900 lbs. It is a major upgrade from the little machine that he learned on.
    Amazing! What a great welding/machining project and a great thing to do. I suspect you have changed one young man's life.

    Do you have any intermediate pictures of the progress?

    JKJ

  6. #6
    Wow! Now that is impressive.

  7. #7
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    WOW +3 Dennis
    Member Turners Anonymous Pittsburgh, PA

  8. #8
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    That looks like a very nice lathe Dennis, it is maybe the third or fourth one I see a picture from that does look well made, bet it took quite a few hours to put together, like a labor of love, well done !!


    Have fun and take care

  9. #9
    Wow, what a great piece of machinery. It looks like the next generation is ready to go. There is no greater gift than imparting your skills and knowledge to the next in line.

    Eric
    I keep cutting and it is still too short.

  10. #10
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    wow! that should last a lifetime!
    Retired - when every day is Saturday (unless it's Sunday).

  11. #11
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    Dennis, how did you control warping when welding the bed supports? Did you weld them all then mill the support tops so the bed would be straight? Or use leveling screws?

    Very impressive. Maybe the young Lad can post a turning or two.

  12. #12
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    Awesome job Dennis!!!!!

  13. #13
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    Wow +10..!!!! That's awesome!
    Thanks & Happy Wood Chips,
    Dennis -
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  14. #14
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    Really super job and a nice thing to do. Gotta come see that one.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Glenn C Roberts View Post
    Dennis, how did you control warping when welding the bed supports? Did you weld them all then mill the support tops so the bed would be straight? Or use leveling screws?

    Very impressive. Maybe the young Lad can post a turning or two.
    I do not have a mill big enough to do the whole thing, so we had to grind the supports until they were level with each other. Warping can not be totally eliminated but with careful tacking, we were able to limit any distortion.
    _______________________________________
    When failure is not an option
    Mediocre is assured.

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