Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Slider toe out continued-Altendorf's manual

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Sterling, Virginia
    Posts
    557

    Slider toe out continued-Altendorf's manual

    Following up on the bump stop thread here are some pages from the Altendorf manual to tune their saws. May not be applicable to all saws but I thought everyone might find it interesting.Altendorf manual.jpgThe order.jpgFree cut left.jpgfree cut left cont..jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Sterling, Virginia
    Posts
    557

    Altendorf manual continued

    Free cut right.jpgFree cut right dia..jpg I skipped the sections on the subrollers,the 5 cut square up and setting the scoring saw. The free cut left (sliding table) I think I have only ever done twice and once was because the tech had the whole beam off the saw. Pretty much unless bumped by the forklift it stays set.
    Last edited by Walter Plummer; 10-26-2017 at 7:20 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Sterling, Virginia
    Posts
    557

    Final Altendorf page

    Sorry but I had a time trying to get this one right side up.not square.jpg

  4. #4
    Thanks Walter for going through the trouble to post this. Very useful information. I especially like the the first page .

  5. #5
    There is a simpler and better way to square the crosscut fence without using 5 sided cut method, check this David Best's flicker forum post https://www.flickr.com/photos/davidp...57635197231922.

    I am surprised that Altendorf's instruction using your ears checking the sliding table toe out. I would think it was a joke it if someone just told me without seeing the written instruction.

    You can lay Oneway multi-gauge on its side on the sliding table to check the toe out.

    James
    Last edited by James Zhu; 10-26-2017 at 9:45 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central WI
    Posts
    5,606
    I have 7 sliders and have not measured more runout at the back of the blade than the front. I grind my flanges and use blades up to 18". If the slider runs away from the blade on the sliding table side, that implies that any cut right of the blade could not be the finish cut as the back of the blade would muck up the cut on the right when the slider is the guide. I'm sure Altendorf knows what they are talking about but setting the slider as close to square as I can and then setting the rip fence to match the square cut on the slider is pretty easy and simplifies my life. Dave

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by James Zhu View Post
    I am surprised that Altendorf's instruction using your ears checking the sliding table toe out. I would think it was a joke it if someone just told me without seeing the written instruction.
    That's what I was thinking. "Don't use a micrometer - make up an arbitrary noise scale and endeavor for one side to be an arbitrary '100' on the scale while the other is an arbitrary '30'"!

    Repeatability may be low

    Very interesting, though!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Phoenix AZ Area
    Posts
    2,466
    I haven't tried the "noise" method but I will say that in my experience the best way to set jointer knives is the "drag a scrap with each knife method". This is where you set a scrap with a flat edge on the outfeed so it overhangs the knife. Rotate the knife by hand and set each knife so the scrap catches and drags 1/4" In my experience it the results from this are easier to get right than when I use a fancy dial indicator on a purpose built jointer setting jig. I can imagine that the noise delta they are talking about would be way less than even .001" of difference so it could result in a nearly perfectly parallel cut. Or one could try to make the noise exactly the same as a way to get a parallel cut?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Southwestern CT
    Posts
    1,392
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Jensen View Post
    I will say that in my experience the best way to set jointer knives is the "drag a scrap with each knife method"
    Use the same method which I had never heard described as a "named version" but seemed intuitive. It is a great fast way to make sure the outfeed table is set properly to the knives, and I'm glad it is an official method of setting the table.

    I also like the simple "free cut" approach outlined in the Altendorf manual (thank you Walter) for validating and setting the angle on the slider as well as the paper thickness height offset. These types of descriptions take some of the mystery out of proper setup. So does this mean in the Altendorf case the fence is not really square, just the resulting cut is square? This makes Dave's approach sound more straightforward.
    "the mechanic that would perfect his work must first sharpen his tools. Confucius

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Sterling, Virginia
    Posts
    557
    The slider's free cut is for cut quality. The fence is squared with the 5 cut method so the parts you cut on the slider are square. The free cut on the rip fence is just like any rip fence. I thought more people would be interested in the method to check the free cut on the rip fence.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Phoenix AZ Area
    Posts
    2,466
    Quote Originally Posted by Walter Plummer View Post
    The slider's free cut is for cut quality. The fence is squared with the 5 cut method so the parts you cut on the slider are square. The free cut on the rip fence is just like any rip fence. I thought more people would be interested in the method to check the free cut on the rip fence.
    Yes, the free cut adjustment is just to reduce tearout from the back of the blade. Too much on the slider side and the blade will create tearout on the top of the part to the right of the blade. Too little or negative free cut on the left of the blade and you will get tearout under the part to the left of the blade. The 5 cut method is to set the fence square to the slider travel. Free cut essentially has nothing to do with cutting square.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •