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Thread: Is posting videos on youtube showing second-rate skills or results fine with you?

  1. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick McQuay View Post
    No harm, no foul. I'm happy that my concerns were unfounded.

    I just wish many of those old videos were readily available to the public legally. I've been woodworking since the 80's and I still learn things when watching anyone who is very skilled and able to communicate that skill to others.

    My concern about the internet, and it's a bit of a rant, is that more value is placed on repetition than reputation. If a bad idea or woodworking myth takes hold in a forum, on reddit, on youtube, or wherever, it's difficult to dislodge.
    It puzzles me why would anybody want to watch a video of it, or think that it adds value in any meaningful way.
    And we are only talking about woodworking. It is the same with television. There are many cases of outright misinformation being broadcast as if it were gospel.

    It is often the good is drowned out by the dregs. Quality isn't cheap and everyone seems to be looking for cheap.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  2. #122
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    "And we are only talking about woodworking. It is the same with television. There are many cases of outright misinformation being broadcast as if it were gospel.

    It is often the good is drowned out by the dregs. Quality isn't cheap and everyone seems to be looking for cheap."
    jtk

    That is why these forums are good places. At least if you suggest chopping dovetail waste with the board resting on your knee you have a chance of someone suggesting that you may not want to do that. Two sides to a conversation is a good thing.
    Jim

    PS I'm not exactly sure how Jim' s quote looks the way it does it was done as reply with quote
    Last edited by James Pallas; 09-17-2017 at 3:02 PM. Reason: Ps

  3. #123
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    PS I'm not exactly sure how Jim' s quote looks the way it does it was done as reply with quote
    I think sometimes the [/QUOTE] gets clipped in translation.

    It can be edited back in
    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  4. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    I think sometimes the
    gets clipped in translation.



    jtk[/QUOTE]

    The i pad needed a reboot guess it's telling me I need to go back to the bench and give it a break.
    Jim

  5. #125
    The Internet and Youtube for woodworking is just like the Internet and Youtube for anything else, to expect any different is not realistic. If I'm watching a video and get new information regarding a technique, I will probably not even finish the video to find out what their piece looks like. If I do finish the video, I don't care if it's perfect or not because it isn't MINE. In the case of the Woodwright's Shop I am always amazed that he can jam as much information as he does into those short episodes, so seeing imperfections and/or mistakes does not bother me because I'm learning about techniques, history and just about anything else that pops into his head during the show (all while being entertained). My stuff is mine and their stuff is theirs and if I see imperfections elsewhere it only motivates me to do better.

  6. #126
    I agree with Steve Tripp to a large extent. You tube has sort of become a go to learning source for me on some subjects. I do cringe when I see stupidity. for instance the gent that loaded his cannon and set it off leaving an open can of powder a few feet away to ignite from sparks and explode. For technique instruction, The Woodwright shop is a perfect example. And he has had a few things go awry on air. Learning how they did it is important. the finesse can be had with care and practice. One of the reasons I can't stand some wood working shows, is the assumption that every body knows what the guy is talking about and how to do it. I know I need some basic learning on some machines, but non power tools not so much. I remember one in which the guy starts cutting a clear piece of wood, the scene breaks and then it shows him taking the piece of wood off the saw, but this time the cut off has a knot in it. Wonder what happened?

    A fellow near here built a house using mortise and tenon timber frame techniques, but used irregular pieces of trees for the timbers. The roof edge is round, reflecting the curve of the arched tree that he cut down. There were exposed timbers in a Y shape. and other oddities. I just can't imagine trying to engineer those joints. Whether or not they have a few gaps, the work is exceptional

  7. #127
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    One of the reasons I can't stand some wood working shows, is the assumption that every body knows what the guy is talking about and how to do it.
    +1 on that.

    One thing that bugs me is some of the woodworking programs seem to have a full cabinet shop setup while supposedly showing how the home viewer could do this in a weekend.

    On another side of this are programs like The Woodwright's Shop and Wood Working for Mere Mortals. Roy Underhill is very educational on hand tool woodworking and Steve Ramsey is a home shop power tool guy. If Steve Ramsey ever used a dovetail in one of his projects it got past me. Likewise it would shock me to see Roy Underhill using a circular saw.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  8. I have one video on YouTube. No talking, actually no instruction of any kind. Just the work being done. No claim that the work is done in the 'right' or 'best' way or anything like that. The production value is quite low. It was fun to make and perhaps fun to watch. Fortunately, I'm not an 'expert' with a reputation to defend or trying to monetize my online exposure.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KleQGHZ7eNI

  9. #129
    I have a couple of Youtube channels. One is on Traditional Wet Shaving, and the other is a new hand tool channel.
    I started the first channel 4 years ago because I got into traditional shaving and wanted to encourage others to try it. I started as a beginner, and made certain folk knew it.
    Now I have found woodworking with hand tools, and it is the same focus; a beginner wanting to encourage others to try.
    Guitar building and the use of a few power tools here and there will spill into this channel, because that is also something I love doing.
    I like to share the things I love doing with others who might be interested, wherever they happen to be. Youtube offers a fantastic opportunity to do that.
    But nowhere do I, nor will I ever, claim to be a master at any of it. It's for fun, and to share things I'm passionate about.
    Won't ever be hawking the latest tool or offering courses on anything. Profit is not nor ever will be a motive for me. Neither is ego. When it ceases to be fun, it will cease. Until then, I'll keep posting them up.
    Last edited by Mike Baker 2; 09-21-2017 at 11:07 PM.

  10. #130
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Guest View Post
    A lot of bad technique and general lack of real craft skills can eventually result in a completed woodworking project with enough time, tools, material, etc. thrown at it. Not much good about that. It puzzles me why would anybody want to watch a video of it, or think that it adds value in any meaningful way.
    Yeah I'm not at the level yet where I'm going to say that Frank Klausz, Michael Dresdner, Phil Lowe, Sam Maloof, or Kelley Mehler, (to name a few) demonstrate bad technique or lack craft. To me those old videos by professional woodworkers do add value and I do enjoy watching them.
    edit; I'm responding to your reply to my post about woodworking videos from the 70's, 80's, & 90's, by professional woodworkers. I'm guessing you were talking about youtube videos but I wasn't.
    Last edited by Rick McQuay; 09-24-2017 at 1:58 AM. Reason: clarification

  11. #131
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    Clickspring has just put up 20 minutes of video excellence. I will never use a metal lathe but any craftsman would aspire to this level of technique, ability and video making skills.


    Chris

    Everything I like is either illegal, immoral or fattening

  12. #132
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    To answer the OP, yes, to an extent. But I'd rather see the video than not. Often times Paul Sellers discloses he's working with contrary positioning to the workpiece than he otherwise would be for the benefit of the camera. I've not worked in front of a camera but you know this has got to affect quality. You just as often hear this from others, even TV folks such as Roy Underhill. I see the latter as more of a tool anthropologist than a nit-picky cabinetmaker, but interestingly, almost all of his shows are shot in one take! Not the setting for museum-quality work I imagine, so I figure the piece is more or less a mock up quality anyway.
    Last edited by Kurtis Johnson; 09-24-2017 at 12:41 PM.

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