Page 11 of 11 FirstFirst ... 7891011
Results 151 to 161 of 161

Thread: New Shop Construction

  1. #151
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    MT
    Posts
    318
    Quote Originally Posted by jim becker View Post
    yea, even if you end up destroying some fire resistant cement board for the temporary need, it's far better than, um...rebuilding after a fire.
    tru - dat
    Regards,

    Kris

  2. #152
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    MT
    Posts
    318

    Shop Layout

    I am still a ways out on finishing the shop building and due to work obligations it will be a while...

    So, I am playing around with some layout options. In the two pics below, I am showing two different layouts as regards the table saw, jointer, and planer.

    Looking for, and would appreciate input on other's experience on optimum layout for these three.







    Regards,

    Kris

  3. #153
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,195
    Hi Kris
    You have a space hog in the garage. Unless you really need it you might want to put the RAS on Craig's List.

    And your table saw is an aircraft carrier. It can be slid to the right or left till it hits the wall and will work out fine there. yo don't need to walk all the way around it. A side benefit is easy DC and power hookups.

  4. #154
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    52,327
    It's all about workflow. Some of that is practical and some of it is personal preference. Jointer and planer are complementary and are often used serially or in parallel while milling lumber. Many folks put them back to back when they don't have a J/P combo that does that automagically, for example. So as you look at each diagram you draw, envision working on a typical project and how your material will move around from tool to tool. That will tell you if you are getting close to what's going to work best for you.

    You could, of course, park the vehicles outside which would free up a lot of space. Including for the bed you're need for getting kicked out of the house for not having parking inside. LOL
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 01-09-2020 at 7:32 PM.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #155
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    MT
    Posts
    318

    Layout

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bender View Post
    Hi Kris
    You have a space hog in the garage. Unless you really need it you might want to put the RAS on Craig's List.
    Thanks Tom. I actually am not sure if I need it. Don't want to turn this thread into a "pros and cons of the RAS" discussion but I will say I bought it on Craigslist thinking it would be good to have, and having sold a nice Dewalt I had rebuilt about 20 years ago decided to pick this one up. It will likely end up back on Craigslist.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bender
    And your table saw is an aircraft carrier. It can be slid to the right or left till it hits the wall and will work out fine there. yo don't need to walk all the way around it. A side benefit is easy DC and power hookups.
    Yeah - not sure how I will handle the table saw. On the outfeed end of the saw is a 4' roll-up door that opens to the garage. The original idea was this would give me room for extra long rips. After thinking about it I don't have the same room on the infeed side so that may not be the best idea. Part of my thinking is I don't want to be moving the table saw around once I figure out the placement and DC hookup. I have seen discussion previously on putting the TS against a wall. Seems like this would work on the RH side of the saw but maybe not the left?


    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker
    It's all about workflow. Some of that is practical and some of it is personal preference. Jointer and planer are complementary and are often used serially or in parallel while milling lumber. Many folks put them back to back when they don't have a J/P combo that does that automagically, for example. So as you look at each diagram you draw, envision working on a typical project and how your material will move around from tool to tool. That will tell you if you are getting close to what's going to work best for you.[/COLOR

    You could, of course, park the vehicles outside which would free up a lot of space. Including for the bed you're need for getting kicked out of the house for not having parking inside. LOL
    Thanks Jim. I think I should have moved my stairwell over a little more which would have given me the ability to put the planer and jointer next to each other. As it stands I am not sure it will work. I will think some more about this.

    I guess I am hoping to get things close to where they will end up so I can figure out my power drops and DC route.

    As regards the "dog house" my office upstairs will have a pull-out bed in the couch but probably would get lonely after a while... Besides my wife put up with me taking over the entire garage (in Montana) at our last house so she deserves a place for her car.
    Regards,

    Kris

  6. #156
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    52,327
    The sleeping arrangements were certainly in jest, but yea...Montana. Even I'd want to park inside there during the winter! I hear you on the stairwell, too. I have that problem in my shop, but didn't have any input since it was already where it is when we bought the property.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #157
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    MT
    Posts
    318
    So I had to go back a ways to find this thread. Boy - life can sure get in the way of getting projects done. I have not made much progress on the shop and with the current workload it may be a while yet. I am thankful to have work during this crazy time.

    I have a question related to heating and cooling (mostly cooling).

    I have a wood stove in the wood shop portion of the building with backup electric heat in the wood shop and in the office upstairs.

    I plan to install a mini split in both areas (approx 500 sf each). I was looking at a Daikin unit that was 18,000 BTU with an air handler in each work area. The cost is about $3,500 for the unit.

    This may not be the most practical solution but it appears I can buy two 9,000 BTU units for about $1,000 apiece. Aside from the space outside (which isn't really an issue) and maybe additional noise what would be the downside of buying and installing two units? I assume power consumption would be a little more for two units versus one - I have 200 amps to the building so not a big concern.

    Appreciate any insight.
    Regards,

    Kris

  8. #158
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    52,327
    Daikon is excellent...that's what I have for my mini split...18K, single interior air handler for 750 sq ft. Power consumption is "minimal". Either way will serve you fine but don't assume that a unit half the size of the 18K dual air handler is adequate for half the space. The calculations don't always work out that way. And noise? What noise? The external units are virtually silent compared to more traditional heat pumps. I have to look at mine to see if the fan is running as even with my hearing aids in, I don't hear it at all from 10 feet away.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #159
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    286
    Kris, in Montana do you need a split with AC? Here in Colo I just open my doors and windows and turn on a ceiling fan in the summer. For winter heat Iím very happy with my Rinnai ES38. Itís an outside vent so safe with sawdust and (hopefully with CO when I have the dust collector in the basement on for a long time). I can control the temp remotely with a Honeywell thermostat and phone app. These are being used very frequently in mountain homes now since they are so efficient. I keep the shop at 40 degrees when Iím not in it and bump it up to 60 before I go out there (using the ceiling fan to recirculate the hotter air near the ceiling). I havenít noticed any significant change in the gas bill. In fact so cheap I may not follow through on my plan to add a wood stove.

  10. #160
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    52,327
    Selection is a lot better for a "full" split system, Jon, so even if the need for AC might be less up there in Montana, it's not a horrible function to have available. I use my AC for humidity control and even to be out of the polen during certain times of the year when it otherwise might be comfortable to have the doors open.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #161
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    MT
    Posts
    318
    Jon - Shop will likely stay fairly cool. Upstairs is an office, and it will get warm up there. Will be good to maintain comfortable environment up there for the 2 months out of the year when it is needed. Also, power is relatively cheap where I live (less than $.07/kWh).

    Jim - will be getting some professional input on the sizing requirements for sure. After researching a bit more - likely will stick with single unit with 2 air handlers. We can get over 100 degrees here although haven't seen that in a couple of years. Humidity not so much in the summer time. Pollen I can relate to. If it wasn't for Zyrtec my life would be miserable (better living through chemistry).
    Regards,

    Kris

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •