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Thread: Veritas Shooting Plane quite a bit out of square. How important is this?

  1. #136
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    This is a lo-o-o-ong thread and I haven't followed every word of it. Is it fair to say that out of flat and out of square are two different measurements? Also I can add that I have a very nice commercial shooting board made entirely of baltic birch ply-wood; with a ramp, and an adjustable fence. I sometimes go weeks or even months without using it. Most of the time, I find it very out-of-square after that time interval. I guess my point it that a plane or a shooting board have to be judiciously set up to get good results. There is no guarantee that both will be ready to use off the shelf.

  2. #137
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    The lateral adjustment is already a technique we often use to edge plane a workpiece.
    Mostly my lateral adjuster is used to make sure the blade is cutting evenly across its width.

    Some use a cambered blade and move it side to side to improve the squareness of a piece. This is usually done by moving the whole plane.

    How many other lateral adjustment techniques are there?

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  3. #138
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    Apr 2015
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    Assuming they check these for square during manufacture, and not just a statistical sampling but each tool, then the body distorted after it was made and boxed for sale. I assume they have a better way of checking them than some guy or gal putting a square on it and holding it up to see if any light is coming through. Easy to get complacent around quittin' time.
    Last edited by Charles Guest; 07-04-2018 at 6:08 PM.

  4. #139
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    Mostly my lateral adjuster is used to make sure the blade is cutting evenly across its width.

    Some use a cambered blade and move it side to side to improve the squareness of a piece. This is usually done by moving the whole plane.

    How many other lateral adjustment techniques are there?

    jtk
    By heart, I think both Derek and David Charlesworth are proponents of cambered blades.

    Other than touching the corners when honing to avoid tracks, I don't have any cambered blades. For the shooting plane, everything is straight across like yours.

    To edge plane, I took James Krenov's teaching heart and soul. 2/3 of the time, a square edge can be had following his advice. The rest, the lateral adjustment OR moving the plane will get the job done.

    Simon

  5. #140
    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Guest View Post
    ...the body distorted after it was made and boxed for sale...
    A virtual impossibility.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  6. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by andy bessette View Post
    A virtual impossibility.
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...12827113003405

  7. #142
    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Leonard View Post
    That might do the trick! Need to get some of that stuff.

    No, I wasn't given any verbage about the condition of the plane other than it met their spec. I miss the QC area I had available a my old job - I could have measured it within a few tenths. I don't trust my eyeballs or my fingers when talking thousandths. But, when I placed the square against it (on a nice flat piece of ref. granite), there was a significant gap at the top.

    Wondered about buying their track. Seems like it would be easy to shim it and adjust the fit too. Might try it.
    I just checked my Veritas shooting plane, using a granite plate and machinist's square. I couldn't find a 0.001" feeler, but a 0.0015" feeler would not pass through. Maybe mine was defective, but the body distorted in a way that "fixed" it. Anyway, it is a fantastic plane and beats a #5 turned sideways. As to the track, I have the 24" track. One needs about 8" of track before the blade even contacts the wood (to be planed), and a little less on exit, that only leaves about 14" of travel. So, I am building a 30" shooting board with a wooden track that is used on entrance and exit, so I have the full 24" of metal track for the actually planning of the board (in my case, guitar parts).

  8. #143
    Glad yours checked out well. I haven't tried the feeler gauge yet. I just got the plane back. I did get the 24" track. It is nice. I threw it on my current board to try it out. I like it so far. One thing I did learn while messing around with this is that my board has a dip in it. I was using a small square and seeing a large gap (the board and plane not square). I knew the plane was not anywhere near THAT much out. But when I checked it with a large square (6"?), the gap pretty much disappeared! Aha! That was interesting. I shimmed my board just playing around. I shot a piece then flipped it over and pushed it against the plane and there was pretty much no gap. I'll have to watch out on shorter pieces. Meanwhile, I need to build a new board. This one looks pretty rough in addition to the dip. I used decent quality baltic birch ply, so I was surprised to see that dip! Not sure what I'll use for the new one. I shudder to consider MDF, but it is usually flat and nice and heavy....and cheap...and...not sure I can do it! The other thing I considered is chucking the whole affair into my CNC router for a little off the top! Looking at Derek Cohen's site makes me want a real 'pretty' one though. I like the adjust-ability too. Another thing I have noticed is that I need to pay attention to how I apply force to the plane. It is easy to rotate the plane enough to rock it even though it is 'captured.' I tend to push it into the work piece and hence I am rotating it a little.

    Thanks for sharing your info. I really enjoy using the plane/board when it all works (or when there is no user error!). There is something immensely satisfying about removing tiny little whisps of wood and crating that hairline gap fit! I am building a small mahogany project right now and I have used it to fit several parts. Very nice. I need to also add a miter attachment.

    Tony

  9. #144
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    Apr 2015
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    If you pay for accuracy you certainly should get what you've paid for.

    That said, you're usually shooting to a knifed line so there should be no confusion about where you're going, even if board and plane are not perfect. The work piece can usually be manipulated a little if necessary take that last little bit of skin that gets you to the line. Again, board and plane don't have to be perfect. Shooting narrow work pieces is definitely convenient. Wide work pieces can be processed in the vise (very wide and long pieces simply clamped to your bench), again working to a knifed line.

    Don't let a machine tool philosophy take over whereby if the machinery isn't dead-on you're left with few alternatives. This isn't so in the hand tool world, where the accuracy is inherent in the marks you've made on the wood and not in the tools you use to remove wood to the mark -- tools that can be remarkably pedestrian. If this notion blows your mind, you're not getting it.
    Last edited by Charles Guest; 07-27-2018 at 9:52 AM.

  10. #145
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    Have a home-made shooting board...somewhere in the shop..I think....

    Been using the Langdon 75 to get square ends on wooden parts....also works nicely on about any angle, up to a 45 degree. Nice when things are square right off the saw....sometimes, I trim things square, after rough cutting with other saws.
    IMAG0101.jpgtest drive.jpgchute-ing board.jpgIMAG0108.jpg
    From a few years ago. Have found that I need to tune this up, before each use....
    squared off.jpg
    Sometimes, this is all I need to do....
    mitre saw.jpg
    Any more, this is what I use the most. Was trimming the ends of a few 1 x 8 drawer sides....needed them squared for cutting dovetails.

    YMMV....

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