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Thread: Thoughts about glue-ups and clamps

  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Hines, MD View Post
    I use the clamp that is needed, and I have a ton of them. Sometimes parallel clamps, sometimes Klik-clamps, sometimes F-style. It just depends on the situation.
    Dr. Hines, I'm guessing some of the fat people need the big strap clamps !
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 01-16-2020 at 9:38 PM. Reason: fixed quote tagging

  2. #32
    Two weeks ago I struggled to clamp a chair I was repairing. It was an odd shape that really didnt fit any clamp or clamping jig that I could think up. I ended up using twine. (Of course, immediately after the repair had fully dried, I found a better way to clamp it - still using twine.)

    A few days later, I ordered 25 ft of surgical tubing from Lee Valley. Odd shapes ahould be much easier next time around.
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  3. #33
    I use jorgy pipe clamps mostly for panel glue ups.

    The BIGGEST improvement in my world has been learning proper jointer technique to get straight edges. But also, reversing the faces of boards as they come off the jointer fence.

    One more thing. Clamp as soon after jointing before anything moves!
    Last edited by Ron Citerone; 01-16-2020 at 10:01 PM.

  4. #34

    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  5. #35
    Hope that's plywood or other sheet good in the field. Nice job on the clamping.

  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by Leo Graywacz View Post
    Hope that's plywood or other sheet good in the field. Nice job on the clamping.
    In case you're addressing me, yes, double layer of 3/4" teak plywood, with solid teak edging, splined with 1/4" Bruynzeel plywood, assembled in 2 glue-ups using WEST epoxy.

    Last edited by andy bessette; 01-17-2020 at 2:29 AM.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  7. #37
    Yes I was. Glad to hear that too. Now it won't blow up on you. I've seen lots of tables made with wood surrounds that bust open their borders because of seasonal changes.

  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by andy bessette View Post

    That is intense clamping there! Thanks for sharing!

  9. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by andy bessette View Post
    In case you're addressing me, yes, double layer of 3/4" teak plywood, with solid teak edging, splined with 1/4" Bruynzeel plywood, assembled in 2 glue-ups using WEST epoxy.

    Glad it worked out. I made an 48 ebony table with a 8/4 maple edge with a radius on one edge. The first table built, shipped and got returned damage from the shipping company.. because of the return several weeks when by and rebuilt a second table. By this time original client bought a different table from the internet. The original table was paid for by the shipping company but the second table wax not. I hope they broke even with the shipping company reimbursements for the first table....

  10. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by Leo Graywacz View Post
    Yes I was. Glad to hear that too. Now it won't blow up on you. I've seen lots of tables made with wood surrounds that bust open their borders because of seasonal changes.
    Yep. And sometimes the round corners can shrink and distort quickly after being cut out. I cut them a little long and put
    them in a warm dry spot before final cut.

  11. #41
    Join Date
    May 2015
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    NW Indiana
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arthur Fleming View Post
    I am not even at complete newbie status yet. I am very close to Finally having made enough room in basement to start setting up a woodworking shop. Another flaw (LOL) for me is I am an electrician, tend to see things more from that side. I read a lot of these threads and try to learn as much as possible so that hopefully I can eliminate some of the upcoming trial and errors. After reading this thread a question I have is for pipe clamps, i have bought some of the pipe clamps and was planning on using aluminum rigid threaded conduit for the pipe. I can cut and thread as much of this as I want at work (See it's that electrician thinking). It seems from reading this thread that there are some negatives about using pipe other than black iron (which I can also rather easily get and thread, but it is much heavier) Any opinions on this might help me only cut and thread the proper type of pipe, the first time. I have found this forum to be like a school/teacher/mentor. Thanks for any input.

    I've found the 3/4" black pipe from Menards to be much smoother and cleaner than what I can get from HD, or other places. Just finished 3 panel glue ups and didn't need to wash my hands. Plus the clamps move more easily over the smooth pipe.
    If you don't stand for something, you'll fall for anything.

  12. #42
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    SCal
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    love that edge glue up!!
    I always wanted to try that, but feared the movement of the edge pulling away from the stable top.

  13. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by Will Blick View Post
    love that edge glue up!!
    I always wanted to try that, but feared the movement of the edge pulling away from the stable top.
    Never had a problem using WEST epoxy. The plywood edges must be coated over and over until they will accept no more saturation. Have used splines, biscuits and nothing but a butt joint. The hardest part is surfacing the edging flush to the veneer.

    Another.

    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  14. #44
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    SCal
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    OH wow Andy, that is beautiful too !!
    Thx for added info. So pls explain why with such deep edging, and a stable top, the edging wont move away from the top at some point? We all know wood moves, but ply is relatively stable. Are you suggesting the Epoxy is so strong it tames the wood movement and prevents pulling way from the ply? Very curious about why this is not problematic. Its great to know it can be done, but any additional info would be helpful.
    thx in advance for sharing your findings...

  15. #45
    Will--thank you very much. I believe this construction is successful mainly because of the teak, which is oil rich and, as such perhaps is more stable during seasonal humidity changes. But also because of the finish that is applied (not shown--someone else applies that), which is a number of coats of WEST epoxy followed by varnish or clear polyurethane, which encapsulates the wood and provides UV protection. On the other hand the marine environment is one of the toughest of all.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

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