Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Bandsaw blade direction

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Ossining, NY USA
    Posts
    61
    Blog Entries
    2

    Bandsaw blade direction

    I have a 14 inch Delta bandsaw with riser block and a resaw blade. This bandsaw tilts in one direction only. Is it possible to install the blade with the teeth facing towards the normal outfeed side of the saw? I'm in the process of machining four legs for a Roubo style workbench. The legs are 6x6 pine and the connection to the bench top is a dovetail and through tenon.

    I have little confidence in my handsaw skills so I want to use machinery to at least get the legs perfect. The holes in the bench top will be done carefully and pared until they fit the legs. These four joints are really critical to the strength and usefulness of the workbench. I've never ever seen anyone put a blade in backwards like this and suspect there is a reason for that...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    In the foothills of the Sandia Mountains
    Posts
    15,751
    Bad idea, IMO. Without the rear thrust bearing in use you would likely pop the blade off the wheels very quickly. Lay out your cuts on both sides of the leg and flip the leg over to make your cuts.
    Please help support the Creek.


    During the middle ages they celebrated the end of the plague with wine and orgies. Does anyone know if there is anything planned when this one ends?

    ---

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Central MA
    Posts
    1,411
    Remove the table stop bolt. The table will tilt the other direction about 10 degrees, design your joint to match the limit of the left tilt.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Carrollton, Georgia
    Posts
    1,815
    Is it possible ? Yes. Should you do it ? I'd say it's worth a try. What's the worst that could happen ? The blade could pop off. Then, I guess, the blade could somehow get caught in the wheel. I've had blades pop off and that's never happened to me, however.

    Sometimes while cutting I notice that the thrust bearing isn't even turning even though it was set very close to the blade, but that's for 1-3/4" material, not 6" material. If you try it, don't push it through with undue pressure. The wood will cut without putting lateral pressure on the blade. Take it slow. Make sure the guides, top and bottom, are set so neither they nor the blade get damaged. Hand turning the wheel will tell you if there's any kind of interference. If you try it be sure to report back so everyone can learn from your experience.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Napa Valley, CA
    Posts
    916
    Instead of reversing the blade, I think I would put a beveled block under the stock to tilt it as it is fed past a vertical blade, facing the normal way.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dickinson, Texas
    Posts
    7,595
    Blog Entries
    1
    I would not consider doing what you are suggesting. The blade would have no support on the back side of the blade. I think it would be a disaster. I lost the bottom guide on my saw a few months back. It was a very scary event. When a band saw comes unglued it is a very memorable experience. The blade could break off of the saw and wrap around some body part.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto Ontario
    Posts
    10,483
    Hi, watch this video to show a ramp made for the purpose.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vf66smVTnxs

    I made a set and have used it at band saw seminars to demonstrate dovetail making..Rod.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    LA & SC neither one is Cali
    Posts
    9,447
    IF you do it the key is having enough tension on the blade for it to work. When I did more joinery on the bandsaw I kept a bandsaw "strung backwards".

    That said supporting the work at an angle is a lot easier.
    Of all the laws Brandolini's may be the most universally true.

    Deep thought for the day:

    Your bandsaw weighs more when you leave the spring compressed instead of relieving the tension.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Carrollton, Georgia
    Posts
    1,815
    Quote Originally Posted by lowell holmes View Post
    The blade could break off of the saw and wrap around some body part.
    lowell, please tell how you would imagine this could happen. Blades break all the time and I've never heard of one coming outside of the housing. Additionally, the blade would be engaged in 6" of wood. Where's it going to go ?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dickinson, Texas
    Posts
    7,595
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Yonak Hawkins View Post
    lowell, please tell how you would imagine this could happen. Blades break all the time and I've never heard of one coming outside of the housing. Additionally, the blade would be engaged in 6" of wood. Where's it going to go ?
    As I recall, the bottom guide fell off of the machine, a loud bang, and the blade was in a knot above the machine. I did not imagine it.

    I recount only to demonstrate there is a lot of energy in the blade and you cannot predict where it will end up.

    If you are determined to do what you propose. wear safety glasses and gloves, just in case.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    21,327
    Blog Entries
    1
    We all know the basic safety rule of never backing out of a curve cut. I tend to apply this to straight cuts as well. The time it takes for the machine to stop so I can back out safely is OK with me versus what can happen if the blade is pulled off the wheels.
    Many have experienced the rather anticlimactic episode of a band coming off the tires of breaking with little result other than some odd noise. Others have experienced the pretzel blade, damaged guides, damaged table inserts or whatever.

    I urge an alternative rather than proclaiming an "accident" due to misusing the tool. A quick sled or fixture set at the angle you require. Better yet, for that few cuts just handsaw it. A handsaw to do the job could be had for about the price of the blade you may damage. You'll skip the misuse of the machine, gain a handsaw and have some fun; its a win-win.
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 12-11-2016 at 10:33 AM.
    I always forget . . . Is it the letter "S" or the letter "C" that is silent in the word scent?
    - Glenn (the second "N" is silent) Bradley

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Ossining, NY USA
    Posts
    61
    Blog Entries
    2
    The consensus seems to be that it's not a good idea from a support point of view as there will be no bearing on the back side of the blade. I confess that I had completely forgotten that bearing and was looking for an easy way to save at most an hour and a few dollars building the correct jig to do the work. Not to mention that I was trying to get the machine to do something that it was never intended to do (usually a very bad idea).

    Thanks for the corrective input!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    3,641
    Quote Originally Posted by Yonak Hawkins View Post
    lowell, please tell how you would imagine this could happen. Blades break all the time and I've never heard of one coming outside of the housing. Additionally, the blade would be engaged in 6" of wood. Where's it going to go ?
    I broke a blade once and it came shooting out of the machine. Pretty damned scary. I was sawing a log that wasn't properly supported; entirely my fault.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dickinson, Texas
    Posts
    7,595
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Wade Lippman View Post
    I broke a blade once and it came shooting out of the machine. Pretty damned scary. I was sawing a log that wasn't properly supported; entirely my fault.
    Band saws are easy to use, breeding complacence. Fingers get too close to blades, work is not properly supported, and bolts vibrate loose. The only way a guide could fall off of a machine is for bolts to loosen and vibrate out. Blade tension is another adjustment it is easy to ignore. Sometimes the blade comes off of the upper tire. Tires can wear and stretch creating issues. Several things can cause the blade to come loose. I was somewhat guilty when my incident happened. I think it is dangerous to use any power tool, or for that matter hand tool. I will not knowingly use any tool in a way it was not designed to be used.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •