Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 24

Thread: Amazing Japanese Hakone Marquetry

  1. #1

    Amazing Japanese Hakone Marquetry

    A short video. The epitome of hand plane skill.

    http://www.woodworkingnetwork.com/vi...ry-mesmerizing

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    LA & SC neither one is Cali
    Posts
    9,447
    That is very cool, it reminds me of the process of making murrini (glass).
    Of all the laws Brandolini's may be the most universally true.

    Deep thought for the day:

    Your bandsaw weighs more when you leave the spring compressed instead of relieving the tension.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    2,231
    Shoot I can do that,I'll need to practice.
    Be back in 50 years.
    Aj

  4. #4
    I'm ready now, I just need 50 years to sharpen.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Griswold Connecticut
    Posts
    6,181
    Wow! That's impressive.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    LA & SC neither one is Cali
    Posts
    9,447
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Hughes View Post
    Shoot I can do that,I'll need to practice.
    Be back in 50 years.
    After I watched this I think most people here could build up the blocks, though it would be a good reason to buy a Bridge City Tools Jointmaker, but slicing the veneers that thin would certainly be beyond my skills.
    Of all the laws Brandolini's may be the most universally true.

    Deep thought for the day:

    Your bandsaw weighs more when you leave the spring compressed instead of relieving the tension.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Issaquah, Washington
    Posts
    1,092
    Bradley,
    Thank you for sharing this and reminding me once again how limited my skill set actually is.
    Regards - Bill

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    NE Connecticut
    Posts
    515
    Here's a bit more modern way to do it:

    https://youtu.be/3B5g7X0h0Nk

    To get the veneers, he uses one of those planing machines that I've only ever seen in Japanese videos (approx. 9 minute mark). He also uses a hydraulic press and a table saw with a donkey's ear sled.

    This stuff is beautiful but I think I would go crazy if I had to do this guy's job for more than a few days.


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Princeton, NJ
    Posts
    5,638
    Blog Entries
    7
    There are a few super surfacers in the US.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    1,460
    Probably more than a few..

    Shop just closed close to me and had a nice one at auction. Sadly I couldn’t muster up any need and excuse for needing it lol..

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Holcombe View Post
    There are a few super surfacers in the US.

  11. #11
    There are a few super surfacers in the US.
    Brian,Are you talking about machines or craftsmen?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Princeton, NJ
    Posts
    5,638
    Blog Entries
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Walsh View Post
    Probably more than a few..

    Shop just closed close to me and had a nice one at auction. Sadly I couldn’t muster up any need and excuse for needing it lol..
    Interesting, did they do timber framing?
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Princeton, NJ
    Posts
    5,638
    Blog Entries
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by Bradley Gray View Post
    Brian,Are you talking about machines or craftsmen?
    Machines, like the one shown in the second video.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Boone, NC
    Posts
    305
    Re: super surfacers

    My day job is with a timber framing company that has a background in doing Japanese style work. We recently acquired a barely used Marunaka super surfacer (as well as a Marunaka wet grinder) but have yet to set them up. They are 3 phase and run on 200 volts and require step down transformers, as well as a couple of other small hurdles to overcome before setup.

    They came from a high end furniture manufacturer in Berkley, CA where the machines were used for one large Japanese timber project for the president of Oracle Software and sat around the shop for many years unused.

    Really looking forward to using it for surfacing timbers as well as furniture parts.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    1,460
    Nope.

    DR Dimes.

    Furniture makers. I was surprised also but I guess it could make quick work of some aspects of their work. I don’t know much of supersurfaces I just know of them. I understand what they do but maybe not their limited or maybe even myriad of uses.

    Much of their pieces are specked as having a hand planed finish “I have a few” and I imagine maybe many of the parts were sent through one of these machines vrs the fairytale of some guy doing it all actually by hand lol..

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Holcombe View Post
    Interesting, did they do timber framing?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •