Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 16

Thread: Wooden Handled Claw Hammer Joy

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Edmond, Oklahoma
    Posts
    1,601

    Wooden Handled Claw Hammer Joy

    Hi All,

    A few weeks ago I went to an estate sale, and paid a couple of bucks for a claw hammer with a wooden handle. I wish I had had more time to look, but was in too much of a hurry, because he had a bunch of hammers, and they were asking $2 each for them. More about that estate sale rust hunt some other time, but for now, the hammer.

    It has been YEARS since I used a wooden handled hammer, as I have a framing hammer and standard weight hammer with steel and rubber handles that are basically professional carpenters hammers, that I have had over 40 years, and use regularly.

    However, I was working on a small project this evening and needed to use a punch to make starts for drilling, so grabbed the "new" wooden handled hammer.....what a joy the thing was to use. I had forgotten how pleasant a wooden handled hammer can be to use. No vibration, and it feels great in the hand. I will definitely be using it a lot more, especially for fine woodworking projects.

    I think it is a pretty good hammer, a Bluegrass, is in good shape, and has a handle that looks almost unused.

    I see why guys who write about woodworking like wooden handled hammers.

    Do many of you use one, or mostly the steel or composition handles?

    Stew
    Last edited by Stew Denton; 10-04-2016 at 9:35 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
    Posts
    10,678
    Thanks to Uncle Arthur....I can't hold onto the Estwing style of hammers. All the hammers I do have, and use, are wood handled. Including two "War Club" framers. Easier on the elbows, too.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Western Illinois
    Posts
    51
    Wood handled hammers all the way.... for around 45 years worth. And they've been Vaughans. There has been the occasional fiberglass handle or the one Estwing, but they ended up in some drawer and rarely see the light of day. Of course I've accompanied those wooden handles with many good pry bars.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dickinson, Texas
    Posts
    7,653
    Blog Entries
    1
    I will not use a metal handled hammer.I have two Bluegrass hammers. I also have a plumb hammer, but prefer the Bluegrass. I'm not aware that Bluegrass hammers are made anymore.

  5. #5
    I think Bluegrass tools were made in Louisville, KY, and the maker is out of business. The mark is prized among Kentucky collectors. The only Bluegrass tool I have is a 1/2" combination wrench. It's a nice one.

    Jim

    BTW, I like wooden handled hammers too. Built a house with two of them--a claw hammer and a rip hammer. It's a nice project to make a new handle for one. (These are not the hammers I built the house with. Just a pair that I refurbished one of, including making the hickory handle.)

    hickory hammer handle vert.JPG
    Last edited by Jim Davis; 10-05-2016 at 12:04 AM. Reason: add info

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dickinson, Texas
    Posts
    7,653
    Blog Entries
    1
    I have a 12 oz claw hammer. I had the head without a handle. I ordered a new wooden handle on line.

    I put the head on the new handle yesterday and now I have a nice 12 oz. claw hammer. I don't know what I will do with it except admire as it hangs on the wall behind my bench.
    I did drive a nail with it yesterday. At least it has been used.

    Sometimes, I feel like a silly old man. Oh well, it sure beats the alternative.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Williamsburg,Va.
    Posts
    12,403
    Back in the 60's and earlier,Bluegrass was a brand that all the hardware stores carried. I don't know if they actually made all their products,or just had them rebadged. But,there was a lot of Bluegrass to be found back then.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dickinson, Texas
    Posts
    7,653
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by lowell holmes View Post
    I have a 12 oz claw hammer. I had the head without a handle. I ordered a new wooden handle on line.

    I put the head on the new handle yesterday and now I have a nice 12 oz. claw hammer. I don't know what I will do with it except admire as it hangs on the wall behind my bench.
    I did drive a nail with it yesterday. At least it has been used.

    Sometimes, I feel like a silly old man. Oh well, it sure beats the alternative.
    Actually, I had a brain hiccup when making this post. The hammer I re-handled is a 4 oz hammer.
    I have a 7 and a 12 ounce Bluegrass that I value very highly. I also have a 16 oz plumb wooden handle.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Putney, Vermont
    Posts
    1,015
    All of my hammers have wood handles.

    A mechanic friend in the shop showed me how to grind V's in a circle around the handle where your hand would be, using the corner of a grinding wheel. About 5-7 circles about 1 inch apart, and it makes for a great grip on the handle.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dickinson, Texas
    Posts
    7,653
    Blog Entries
    1
    My Bluegrass have the multi-faceted handles. I sure like the feel of them.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
    Posts
    10,678
    Usedto have a "Plumb" with the rubber grip on a fibreglass handle.......seemed like it always wanted to twist in the grip. LOTS of bent nails..... wood handled ones do not seem to twist in my hands. I also add a ring of black vinyl tape right at the end of the handle. Lets me know when the grip is getting near the end of the handle. Fun part... I can rust hunt a few handle-less hammers for maybe a $1 a head. Get them home, and rehandle them right up
    IMAG0007.jpg
    I can also get new handles at Menards....less than $4 a handle. The black end is the tape ring. 16oz curved claw hammer

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Bakerton WV
    Posts
    259
    I started using wooden handle framing hammer around 1980, I have never gone back to steel or fiberglass. The one thing I do with wood handles is wrap them with friction tape, gives a very secure grip while remaining loose in the hand. The Estwing hammers are pain producing just from looking at them, I can't imagine the number of tendon and nerve problems they led to.

    I always thought some of the Bluegrass hammers were Kelly/True Temper rebadged, but I have no way of knowing other than one being a mirror image of the other.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Livonia, Michigan
    Posts
    779
    I have one 12 oz. rip hammer with a metal/rubber handle. Haven't used it since... about 45 minutes ago. Great for light work where shock really isn't present in the first place.

    For real work the 16 oz. and the 20 oz. claw hammers come out. Both with wood handles. Wooden have any other way.

    Growing up Dad had his favorite hammer- a Plumb 16 oz. claw. Had to be his favorite, it was the only one he owned.

    -Tom

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Edmond, Oklahoma
    Posts
    1,601
    Tom,

    My dad had a 16 ounce wooden handled hammer also. Wish I had kept it, is was an extremely well made hammer, very nicely finished, well proportioned, and nicely balanced. I don't know the brand.

    Stew

  15. #15
    Definitely rebadged, at least some of it. Their planes were Sargent 400 series.

    But then, so were nearly everyone else's rebadged planes...

    Quote Originally Posted by george wilson View Post
    Back in the 60's and earlier,Bluegrass was a brand that all the hardware stores carried. I don't know if they actually made all their products,or just had them rebadged. But,there was a lot of Bluegrass to be found back then.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •