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Thread: Another lighting question-quick and easy.

  1. #1
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    Another lighting question-quick and easy.

    I think. Well, we haven't talked about lighting in, what, maybe a week? I went back last night and started rereading the old posts about lighting, and I realized I had never gotten the FFW article on lighting so many had talked about. So I downloaded and read it. I did get a little bit of extra information, and a some good information on terms that helped me. The information on how many lights per size of room showed me I was right on track with my thinking for my 20 X 24 shop. Because of where my cyclone closet is, I'm thinking about going with 6-8' fixtures that have 4-4' lights in them in the main part of the shop. I will then go with 4-4' double tube lights on the north end around the cyclone closet, possibly changing the one over the bench to a 4', 4 bulb unit. Then 2-8' quad bulb units in the finishing room (12 X 14), althought I wondered about using 3. The finishing room does have 2 windows in it for some natural light.

    Since I can't seem to find the fixtures on line, except the $180.00 units , I will plan to get these at HD. I have priced the daylight T8 bullbs at HD and they are 2 for 6.97. but can't tell what CRI they are. Then looking on the net I found a place to order bulbs by the case, I would need 2 cases. Question 1. They have the T8 bulbs in 86 CRI at 5000 degree Kelvin for $47.50 a case. Then they have the 95 CRI tubes at 6000 Kelvin for 97.50 a case. I know the 95's will be brighter, but do I need that much? My shop is pretty dark even with the 10' wide door open...Lots of shade trees. (did I just answer my own question?) Or will the 86's be more than adequate and be able to save about 100 bucks? (never mind my last name, I actually have more Scottish blood in me than Irish) Just as a note, I do have two task specific lights per major tool mounted to shine on the blade/bit during use, from 2 different angles overhead. The other variable you may want to consider is that I'm approaching the big 50 and lighting does seem to be more important than it used to.
    Hope everyone is having a great weekend! GO (insert your favorite team here)!! Jim

    ps: I had also given some thought to one case of each, with 95's exclusively in the finishing room, then scattered around the shop with the 86's, usning the 95's above the tools and bench area first. Jim.
    Last edited by Jim O'Dell; 10-02-2005 at 11:13 AM.

  2. #2
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    Jim, I'm inclined to agree with your ps. Put the better color renditioin in your finishing area and where you need it in the shop. Have you tried a local electrical parts supplier for a better price on lamps? I tend to make things really bright in a shop, so, if it were mine to do, I'd put the "brighter" lights in the whole shop.
    Feel the wind and set yourself a bolder course

  3. #3
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    Hi Jim. Remember that CRI means Color Rendition Index where sunlight is index number 100. Hence, the higher the CRI, the closer to sunlight the bulb is. We are talking color, not light intensity; the watt rating on the bulb will set the amount of light coming out of the bulb.

    By definition 6500 degrees Kelvin is the color white for photographic purposes. If you go over 6500K the color moves toward blue, less than 6500K and it is moving toward red. It seems that the general population likes their color TV picture cranked up to about 8000+ K. Many, if not all, TVs come from the factory with this high setting. To make things worse, the manufactures invented 'scan velocity modulation' that slows down the electron beam when it paints white on the screen thus giving a false presentation of white, and ragged edges around the white. The first thing I did on my Sony XBR was to unplug the SVM circuit. But, that is another discussion on having your TV calibrated.

    When determining where to mount your light fixtures, consider that the light of a single fluorescent bulb will radiate out as a 360 degree cylinder and the reflector will redirect the light to the floor and also around the shop. Given that you don't have a restricting reflector on the fixture, you will have overlapping areas of light in the shop from two adjacent fixtures. Your job is to arrange the fixtures so that you get even light intensity everywhere in the shop. Since you are dealing with a tube type bulb, the intensity goes down directly with the distance from the bulb. With a spherical bulb, the standard light bulb, the intensity goes down by the square of the distance from the bulb.

    When I bulbed my shop, I bought a case of bulbs from Full Spectrum Solutions .

    Oh yes, do not buy magnetic ballasts, definitely do with the electronic ballast. They will be quieter, and IMO give better light. Some of the high CRI bulbs require the electronic ballasts.

    As always, my opinions are worth what you paid for them, i.e., your mileage my vary.
    Best Regards, Ken

  4. #4
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    Larry, I started with that thought, too. And may still go that way. It's that darn Scottish blood from my mother's side of the family. Makes me look at a cheaper way of doing things. If it were too bright, I could pull a few bulbs, but I don't think I'll have that problem..I'm getting to that stage in life where I soak up the light to function.

    Ken, I looked at the site you posted, but they want 6.00 per bulb in qtys from 24 to 99. That's 50% higher than the site I found, plus the ones at full spectrum are 91 CRI-5000 Kelvin, and the ones from businesslights.com are 95 CRI-6000 Kelvin, run 97.50 for 25 (3.90 ea.) but have a lower life span expectancy.

    Ken, you also touched on reflectors...I haven't been able to find any T8 fixtures with them, except for the troffers which I've had to rule out becaust they won't fit beteen my ceiling joists, and I can't have them hanging below, just too little headroom as it is. So I'm playing with the idea of building my own that I make into a semi-circle and mount to the joists, cut 2X8 lumber to match the arc and put 3 per 8' light fixture to mount the lights and reflectors to. The wood would also be anchored to the joists. I have a metal roofing manufacturer close to me that I figure if the sheets are the right width, I could get them to put a 90 degree brake angle on each side to mount to the joists from the bottom. Or I have used some composite plastic/fiber shower wall material that is textured and shiny bright white that might work, but not as structural. Still playing with that idea. I was hoping to find the fixtures at a decent price on line that had the reflectors, but haven't had any luck yet. Haven't seen anything like it at HD. Need to look a little closer at Lowe's. Thanks for the ideas!! Jim.

  5. #5
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    Jim, it looks like you have a good source for your bulbs, go with it

    By reflector I was thinking of the white enamel metal surface "thingy" that hides the ballast. I have not seem any fluorescents with a bright shinny reflector like you see in some incandescent fixtures.

    The main thing is that you get a solution that you are happy with. It looks like you are on the right track.
    Best Regards, Ken

  6. #6
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    Ken, most of the reflectors I've seen are white metal, like on a tipical hangint 4' shop light. Hang off the sides of the fixture about 4 to 6". All it does is keep the light from going up where it's not a usuable. I'll keep looking and scheming!! Jim.

  7. #7
    Jim,
    Regarding fixtures and reflectors...reflectors can make a large difference and will be available in white as well as silver (silver common on the egg crate style reflector). Look for 1'x4' troffers - these will fit between your joists, and typically will have 2 4' T-8 lamps and an electronic ballast. Go with the higher CRI if you can justify it at all, it does make a big difference and the bulbs do last a long time... Buy quality fixtures, bulbs and ballasts...there can be a huge difference in quality and performance...stay away from the junk... the major names are all ok..
    discalimer - i do work for a major lighting/ballast company....
    Roger

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