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Thread: Advice on Trunk Restoration, Please..

  1. #16
    I'd agree if it weren't for the cross grain crack.. which just looks rather ugly and will never "blend", it stands right out and I think the owner doesn't want to see it!

  2. #17
    In my business, a customer might need their machine yesterday and not understand that industrial freight is a whole different deal than, say, a box from UPS. I never say "no", but I would say, "Sure, we have it shipped overnight. The price will be $5K. If that does not work for you, freight will be $500 and it will arrive in 3-4 business days. Which option do you prefer?".

    In your case, there might be a straightforward solution, like filling it and color-matching it with epoxy, for one price. Then, the complete fabrication of a new top, for another price. Either one should reflect your time but this way, they make the decision, not you.

    Anyhow, just some food for thought.

    Erik
    Felder USA Territory Representative: Central & South Texas

  3. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by jeth chiapas View Post
    So my current plan is to remove and reinforce the panel, prepare the surface to create as even a curve as possible then veneer over it (am thinking of trying the iron on technique to avoid making up a former or shaped cauls for clamping) with a thin layer of similar material to cover up all the ugliness. I will then re-fix the panel using wooden buttons to allow movement. Does this seem viable?
    A couple thoughts for you to consider Jeth, FWIW.
    1. Think through how you will re-curve that (old, damaged) top if it flattens out a bit after you remove the nails. I'd be concerned about causing new cracks when you try to put it back on.

    2. Will veneer really look better than repairing those cracks with epoxy and butterflies (on the inside)?

    It should be an interesting job. I'd sure like to see pictures of how it comes out. Good luck!
    Fred

    Edit: Wait a minute. Maybe this is what you are already planning to do, and I just "got it". But it seems like you could route-out, or chisel-out an area that is perhaps 1/8" deep and going from one edge of the top to the other. Make the edges very straight and clean. Then apply epoxy and butterflies on both sides of the top, spanning the cracks. Finally, inlay a 1/8" thick piece of the original material. If you take it all the way across like this, it might look like the top was originally made of 3 separate boards.
    Last edited by Frederick Skelly; 08-29-2016 at 7:29 PM.

  4. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Frederick Skelly View Post
    A couple thoughts for you to consider Jeth, FWIW.
    1. Think through how you will re-curve that (old, damaged) top if it flattens out a bit after you remove the nails. I'd be concerned about causing new cracks when you try to put it back on.

    2. Will veneer really look better than repairing those cracks with epoxy and butterflies (on the inside)?

    It should be an interesting job. I'd sure like to see pictures of how it comes out. Good luck!
    Fred

    Edit: Wait a minute. Maybe this is what you are already planning to do, and I just "got it". But it seems like you could route-out, or chisel-out an area that is perhaps 1/8" deep and going from one edge of the top to the other. Make the edges very straight and clean. Then apply epoxy and butterflies on both sides of the top, spanning the cracks. Finally, inlay a 1/8" thick piece of the original material. If you take it all the way across like this, it might look like the top was originally made of 3 separate boards.
    Thanks for your thoughts Frederick, what you describe in your edit is about what I have planned.. The curve of the top is not too pronounced so even a flat bottomed channel to inlay into should be possible, shaping the inlay piece into the curve after glue up. I now have some original material as the bottom panel had some damage and I decided to sacrifice it, I'll make a new one and fix with slotted screws, easy enough. The bottom board seems to have been next to the top panel board in the tree, so the stock is a close match.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Houston, Texas area
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    1,078
    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Aeschliman View Post
    ... then I suggest removing the nails,...
    Any tricks for pulling countersunk nails while minimizing damage to the wood?
    Mark McFarlane

  6. #21
    First off, I would not do the repair by just filling the cracks with epoxy. I think that will turn out worse than just leaving the cracks as is. I also would not attempt to close up the cracks and hold them closed with butterflies. They will only just crack again and open either in the same place or cause a new crack.

    What I would suggest since you stated you have material that is similar in texture, grain and color, is to cut a thin strip tapered to fit into the crack that comes in from the left in photo #2. Adjust the thin strip so that it fits as closely as possible into the existing crack without spreading the crack open any wider. This wil require lots of trial and error fitting until you get it perfect. Then glue it in place with woodworker glue.

    For the cross grain crack, work some glue into the crack and use weights or strap clamps and block to pull the piece back down into position closing up the crack. Do this dry first to get your clamping method worked out, then blow in or suck in woodworkers glue. Then for the other crack long crack, do not attempt to pull the nail. Make thin pieces that fit into the crack on either side of the nail and glue them in place. Once the cracks are filled, sand the surface to remove any excess glue and to make the inserted pieces flush. This method will be much more work, but I think the end result will be cracks that are all but invisible and a much happier owner.
    Lee Schierer
    Captain USNR(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Please Contribute

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    New Hampshire, USA
    Posts
    240
    I would be in the camp of suggesting that you dont try to close up the cracks. A board that wide has a lot of seasonal movement, and it will likely reopen unless you re-build it in such a way to accommodate that movement. I also would forgo the epoxy so that any possible future repairs dont have to deal with removing old epoxy. I might try to add some stability to the cross grain crack by gluing a thin patch with hide glue to the inside making sure the grain runs in the same direction, but I think thats all. Hide glue makes it so its easy to repair in the future.

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