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Thread: Pecan Desk - From Log to Desk

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    1,388
    Todd, I did mill it myself, but there is a sawmill up near Denton with a dehumidification kiln that I rent some space in so I could get it dried down to ~8% MC.
    Grady - "Thelma, we found Dean's finger"
    Thelma - "Where is the rest of him?!"

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Richmond VA
    Posts
    57
    Man, that looks good!

  3. #18
    There is a lot to like about this piece. Saving the log from the burn pile, to walnut inlay on the legs, to the cool contrast between live edge and refined cabinets. I fully intend to borrow from your design Thanks for sharing!

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Pittsburgh
    Posts
    7
    That's badass man. Seriously beautiful.

    Is there a big difference in how you finish d the top slab vs the sides and legs? It seems like the top has more color and pop, which is one of the reasons I think it's so interesting.

    Thanks

  5. #20
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    N Illinois
    Posts
    4,448
    Beautiful wood and great job!!!!
    Jerry

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Chappell Hill, Texas
    Posts
    4,741
    What was the "as cut" thickness, what was the thickness once dried, and what is the final thickness? How did you plane it down when preparing the top?

    Thanks, Todd

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    1,388
    as cut I believe was 2". The dried thickness was maybe around 1-7/8". I have a 38" woodmaster drum sander that I use to sand them down flat when I get them back from the kiln. The kiln has a CNC router table they run an end mill bit on for leveling large slabs that took it down to about 1-5/8" then I sanded it down to about 1.5". I have them do enough flattening on their CNC table that I have parallel faces (but usually still have some low spots from uneven shrinkage) then I just start with 60 or 80 grit on the drum sander to flatten the faces, then run up to 180 and hand sand above that.
    Grady - "Thelma, we found Dean's finger"
    Thelma - "Where is the rest of him?!"

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