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Thread: Saw Till Design

  1. #16
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    Aug 2003
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    Boulder, CO
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    That's a great scan! It seems to confirm what I'd suspected which is if you can get the hang angles lined up there's no particular magic to handle down. Handle up is probably marginally better for the blade straightness but I seriously doubt it all that much better given my sawing technique. I wouldn't have thought about the slots running with the grain but that's a good idea.

    I do have two things going for me:
    - Almost all the saws I've inherited need new handles so I'm somewhat at liberty to pick the "hang angle" if I may use that term.
    - This is Colorado and there is no moisture. In fact the climate is actively trying to dehydrate me and my family into a prune which took some getting used to when I moved here.

    The Oracle of Google seems to indicate kerosene will indeed absorb moisture. Pure SWAG, but in this day and age I'm pretty sure a bunch of silica beads or your local disposable diaper hydro gel filling will likely absorb several orders of magnitude more water. And be way easier to contain. Also smell nicer. Also not spill all over. Also not catch on fire.

    Obviously the trick only works if it's an enclosed cabinet. In my case I suspect most of my rust issues are from sawdust and the salt/sweat from my hands not getting properly wiped off.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Josh Nelson View Post
    Of course.



    It's hard to see but it is a closing cabinet. The text notes:
    Josh:

    That is exactly the sort of cabinet I would recommend for permanent storage. I don't have one that nice, at least, not one that stores the saws vertically within an enclosed cabinet.

    It appears the saws in the cabinet are inserted with the cutting edge facing out. This seems like a convenient and natural orientation for inserting or removing a saw, but I would be concerned about the possibility of cutting my knuckles or even wrist when inserting or removing a saw from a the cabinet when it is full and I am in a hurry. I think I would orient the cutting edge toward the cabinet's back, and attach a sacrificial strip of softwood to the back to keep the blades from scratching the cabinet's back.

    Thank you very much for the image.

    Stan

    PS: As someone who is paranoid about rust (and little green men), the fellow's hand on the sawblade in the image is disconcerting. Salty sweat and handprints are very effective at rusting saw blades.
    Last edited by Stanley Covington; 06-22-2016 at 4:37 AM.

  3. #18
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    Nov 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Bassett View Post
    Is there a chemist in the house that can explain to me how a dish of kerosene prevents rust?

    (I understand oiling or waxing the metal can protect it from moisture and that kerosene is (sorta') a light volatile oil. But, how does a dish protect the metal? Does it evaporate from the dish and then condense on the metal?)
    Well, I would not recommend that method because fumes of kerosene are not very healthy. Depending on the oil source and production it also contains aromatic compounds that are known now to be unhealthy and carcinogenic.

    Otherwise, any liquid has so called fumes pressure. Fumes replace air in the closed box and along moisture in it, so to speak. Here there is also additional effect of condensation on the metal parts. When you take saw out it will continue to smell kerosene. But this doesn't add much to corrosion prevention once moisture (water fumes) is forced out, I think.

    Box should be closed but not air-tight closed. It will also leak kerosene fumes out. Other similar volatile liquids can be used in place of kerosene, as long as they do not contain water or other rust promoting things. Similarly, one can use can with compressed gas and open it inside the box when it is closed to force humid air out. Has to be repeated each time fresh air comes in the box. Similar to what one would do with open can of oil finish, for example.

    For long term storage it is better to submerge saw in kerosene So, one barrel of oil with some holes in it to put saw plates through them, hehe.

  4. #19
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    Jun 2012
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    Bay Minette, AL
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Bassett View Post
    Is there a chemist in the house that can explain to me how a dish of kerosene prevents rust? (I understand oiling or waxing the metal can protect it from moisture and that kerosene is (sorta') a light volatile oil. But, how does a dish protect the metal? Does it evaporate from the dish and then condense on the metal?) Thanks. (ETA: I was typing while Stanley was.)
    I have no clue if it actually works but I've seen plenty of old clocks with kerosene dishes in the bottom. The idea being that as the kerosene evaporates it lubricates the sealed interior. To be honest, it sounds like a fire hazard to me. *Oops, missed the posts above mine.
    Last edited by Josh Nelson; 06-22-2016 at 10:33 AM.

  5. #20
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    Nov 2015
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    Some more chemistry comes to my mind...

    Kerosene prevents water and oxygen to meet on the steel surface. It prevents corrosion by building a barrier between reactive parts. Like all oils do.

    Another method would be to get rid of oxygen inside the box. It is required for steel to rust. One might try to burn oxygen out by igniting those kerosene fumes! (For the record, when I was young I tried that method above. It has some collateral damage to it.)

    Alternatively, something that absorbs water from the air would also prevent rust. In my school times I used CuSO4 to do that. Normally, it contains water and looks like big blue crystals. Put it to the oven for half an hour and it becomes white powder and absorbs water. Plate with this thing on the bottom of the box would remove the water vapors. Put it back to oven when it becomes too much blue and use it again. There are some other compounds of similar properties. Also some of them sold commercially as dehumidifiers. Some can be regenerated some not. Requires box to be closed and better yes but not necessarily air-tight.

    Plants are known to produce isoprene - volatile liquid as well. Even our body produces it, it is in our breath. Unfortunately, in big quantities it has anesthetic effect and can cause paralysis and death. Hmm... also not safe, even though it is environment friendly.

    There is also electrochemical method of corrosion prevention, so called cathodic protection. Make electrical contact between the saws in the box and connect them to a battery "-" pole. Make bottom of the box from some other metal or better graphite and connect it to "+". Required voltage of the battery would depend on distance between two electrodes and shape. If it would closely follow shape of the saw (but not make a contact with it) then it will be less. Probably even less than 1000 Volts. Would also depend on humidity. More humidity less voltage. As extreme example, it will be few volts if saws would be submerged into water.

    Clearly, chemistry is fascinating thing and can give a lot of recipes. That's why I end up with master degree in chemistry, more or less.

    Now, you have some concepts of rust prevention to consider in your design!
    Last edited by Andrey Kharitonkin; 06-22-2016 at 10:36 AM.

  6. #21
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    Jun 2010
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    Most of my saws hang from ceiling joists. Since the shop is in a basement, I can call those overhead 2x10s joists. One of the tills is mere a large wooden jawed clamp. I clamp it to the joist, and use the two handles to hang about six saws on each. There are a few long screws overhead as well, mainly from one or three saws ( like coping saws/hacksaws)

    Till cabinet? Well one could just walk into the local BORG, and find an Upper Cabinet in their Kitchen/Bath cabinet areas. French cleat it to the wall, and fill it up. Close the door that came with the cabinet. You can add either a slotted 1x6 near the top to hold saws by their handles, with a smaller 1x to keep the plates seperate down below. Slot that one as needed.

    Plane till? Mine seems to do just fine...
    saw Till.jpg
    Some were in use when this was taken. Till will hold 12 saws
    FULL till.jpg
    Plane till, leans back about...15-20 degrees, just enough that the planes will sit still.

  7. #22
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    Oct 2015
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    Blacksburg, VA
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    15
    I have heard some cautions about intentionally drying out saw storage with dessicant due to excessive drying and cracking of the wood. I haven't verified this, but something to consider and maybe try with less valuable saws. Rust protecting vapors or coatings wouldn't have this drying effect, and sealing tools inside a container with a known low moisture should help avoid rusting and cracking simultaneously.

    If anyone does want to go the desiccant route, you can get large packages for cheap from most industrial suppliers.

  8. #23
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    Aug 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrey Kharitonkin View Post
    Some more chemistry comes to my mind...
    Thank you... I think?

    My first thought was the possibility of executing your combustion method accidentally. (My second thought was how stinky real kerosene is.) I don't think I'll be trying this form of rust prevention, though the saw till plan has me scheming.

  9. Quote Originally Posted by Bob Glenn View Post
    There's a nice saw till article in the current PWW mag. Not the style you're wanting, but worth a look.
    And it looks good, too. For those who are concerned about keeping saws or planes out in the open air, puts doors on the till. In my opinion, hanging saws blade down needlessly complicates the storage issue. As noted, you probably don't want the weight of the saw resting on the toe end, and making an efficient way of storing saws, making sure the plates and teeth don't bounce off each other, and ease of placing and retrieving saws - handle down with the saw at a slight angle with each plate resting in a groove is probably more ideal. Plane storage is similar, but you can either store them vertically, or you can store them laying in horizontal "cubbies". No matter what, you're probably going to need more the 2 linear feet of wall space.

    Or something portable/on wheels.

  10. #25
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    Mar 2009
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    Two feet is plenty of space for a tried and true till, if you ask me.


    And planes can go in another cabinet above or below:
    ~ Do not seek to follow in the footsteps of the men of old; seek what they sought.

  11. #26
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    Apr 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stanley Covington View Post
    Josh:

    Please show us drawings or pics if you get a chance. I will take some pictures of mine later this week and post them.

    Stan
    I have attached pics of my sawrack. It currently holds Disston No.7, a few exchangeable-blade Japanese saws, and a couple of older handmade high-quality saws.

    It is simple tenon & pin & pine construction, no back, finished with milkpaint. Very inexpensive. I use this only for temporary storage when I have a project going on, just to keep the saws cleared off my workbench. The saws rest in a slot in the horizontal board. This board has a lip rabbeted into the outward-facing top surface to retain the saws. They cannot slip and fall. I do not recommend this arrangement for long-term storage of valuable saws in humid climates or for workshops in close proximity to teenage girls and the humidity fluctuations they create.

    Portability is important to me in my current job. This sawrack is suspended from the side of a wire rack (collapsable and on casters) by two metal hooks.

    I have also attached a pic of its sister plane and mortise gauge rack. Similar construction, similar purpose, but it rests on the floor and is kept from falling over by two feet attached with screws. It is of course intended for holding only Japanese planes and mortice gauges.

    Stan
    Attached Images Attached Images

  12. #27
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    Jul 2007
    Location
    Houston TX
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    543
    I have 2sf of LV anti-corrosion drawer liner stapled to the inside of the door of my plane cabinet. After each day's use, my planes are stripped down and wiped with an oily rag. Rust has not been a problem, even in my high-temp/high humidity Houston garage shop.

  13. #28
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    Feb 2003
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    Twin Cities, Minnesota
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    275
    Thanks for the photos, Stanley. I may have to try your "handles up" system. I'll probably do a first one for my back saws. I don't have a lot of wall space in my shop so your system seems pretty economical space wise.

  14. #29
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    Feb 2014
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    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
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    Here are some pictures I took today of my first Saw Box. It's sat on a floor since I made it in 1974 out of Yellow Pine 2x10's and wood screws. I've since made one that holds a lot more saws, but it was nowhere near where I was to take pictures today. I can't remember how many the newer one holds, but probably around 15, packed closer with handles on opposing ends. The newer one has dovetailed corners, and a plain paneled lid. I'll get some pictures when I go to that shop.

    This old one just holds some banged up users in a small variety for different carpentry purposes.

    sawboxsmall.jpg

  15. #30
    Saws are spring steel. If the issue of creep were something to worry about, there would have been a lot of cars dragging the ground back when they had leaf springs. Didn't happen, though some did sag and have to be replaced. There is essentially no force on a saw plate standing with the handle down. To make a kink or bend in a saw plate it has to be sprung beyond the elastic limit. Atkins used to advertise their saws as being able to have the toe bent clear back to touch the handle without any permanent bend.

    As for kerosene and other special ways to prevent rust, I think those were the inventions of folks whose garage/shops had dirt floors, porous walls and air leaks around windows and doors.

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