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Thread: Question about Vectrics software

  1. #1
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    Question Question about Vectrics software

    I'm getting interested again in getting a CNC router, so I have been diligently studying software first. It's been about a decade, so I am really impressed with Vectrics software.

    A question came up about modeling within the software. (I haven't downloaded a trial copy yet.)

    I have a plank with dimensions of 4" x 6" x 1/2". I want to cut it out of a larger plank with additional features such as holes and grooves in one face.

    Is it possible to model both rounded corners and 1/16" chamfered edges at the same time within Vectrics software?

    I can easily do this with a hand router, but I have never been able to show both of these operations in my Sketchup models without resorting to some intersecting model tricks.
    Paul
    These words are my opinion, WYLION. Any resemblance to truth or fiction is accidental at best.
    "Truth lies dormant in our future history." ― Paul Lawrence LXVII
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  2. #2
    By rounded corners, do you mean fillets?
    How do you plan on cutting these rounded corners and chamfers?
    If your cutting a chamfer with a V bit, then there's really no need to model it. Just cut along a vector at the appropriate depth. The preview will show the chamfer, with no need to model it.
    A fillet would be similar, if you use a roundover bit. Modeling it would probably require a 2 rail sweep, but you might need to build your model from multiple components.
    There's also a gadget that someone wrote to do fillets.

    Remember that you don't have to model everything, as you can do simple tasks with simple vectors and form tools.
    Gerry

    JointCAM

  3. #3
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    I should have defined what I mean by model. The simplified version is that I might need to present images for approval before manufacturing, and it is nicer if they are very close to reality.

    Remember that you don't have to model everything, as you can do simple tasks with simple vectors and form tools.
    Thanks, Gerry. Good insight for me.
    Paul
    These words are my opinion, WYLION. Any resemblance to truth or fiction is accidental at best.
    "Truth lies dormant in our future history." ― Paul Lawrence LXVII
    "Confidence is ignorance. If you're feeling cocky, it's because there's something you don't know." ― Eoin Colfer, Artemis Fowl



  4. #4
    With Aspire (or V Carve Pro), you get a preview of the finished part after machining, so if the tool will cut it, you'll se it inthe preview, whether it's in the model or not.

    Nothing beats playing with the demo to find out if it will do what you need it to do.
    Gerry

    JointCAM

  5. #5
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    Paul, Vectric's V-Carve & Aspire will give you a pretty accurate preview. Some special or custom form tool geometry that you use may need to be added to the tool library but once it is added, the software will show it in the preview - at least that has been my experience.
    Vectric has a great tutorial library: https://www.youtube.com/user/Vectric/videos

    Here's a Vectric preview and actual picture of a simple coat rack I made for a friends granddaughter:
    Attached Images Attached Images
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  6. #6
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    I have seen most of the tutorials now, but I didn't see anything specifically like what I was asking for above. I know a CNC router will do the job, I just don't know if I can get it drawn in the first place.
    Paul
    These words are my opinion, WYLION. Any resemblance to truth or fiction is accidental at best.
    "Truth lies dormant in our future history." ― Paul Lawrence LXVII
    "Confidence is ignorance. If you're feeling cocky, it's because there's something you don't know." ― Eoin Colfer, Artemis Fowl



  7. #7
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    Paul...
    Yes you can do what you wish. Since you can "Easily accomplish this with a hand router" and "know a cnc router will do the job", one experienced with VCPro will be able to both present a preview of what you ask and perform the cutting actions. That said, the methodology behind both may be slightly different as corner rounding on a CNC is not the best use of the tool. Depending on material, it may be better to use the router table.
    Gary Campbell
    CNC Technology & Training

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Campbell View Post
    Paul...
    Yes you can do what you wish. Since you can "Easily accomplish this with a hand router" and "know a cnc router will do the job", one experienced with VCPro will be able to both present a preview of what you ask and perform the cutting actions. That said, the methodology behind both may be slightly different as corner rounding on a CNC is not the best use of the tool. Depending on material, it may be better to use the router table.
    Gary is right.

    There are many things that I CAN do with the CNC router, but are BETTER (defined as faster/easier) done on the router table or shaper. What those things may be will depend upon the tooling you have available to you in your particular shop, and your experience with your particular CNC.
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  9. #9
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    I understand that a CNC has some limits, and I am trying to find one of them. This operation is one that I would need to be repeated quite frequently, so the advantage of getting it done at the same time as other operations is great.

    I'm imagining the operation would be to run the chamfered edge first and then round the corners as the part is cutout. I understand that the part has to be flipped and indexed to get both sides chamfered, so that may be the key to doing the chamfer on a manual router table.

    The attached sketch is as close as I can get with Sketchup. I suppose the next thing I need to do is export as DXF and import into a trial version from Vectrix.

    PlankRoundedChamfered.jpg
    Paul
    These words are my opinion, WYLION. Any resemblance to truth or fiction is accidental at best.
    "Truth lies dormant in our future history." ― Paul Lawrence LXVII
    "Confidence is ignorance. If you're feeling cocky, it's because there's something you don't know." ― Eoin Colfer, Artemis Fowl



  10. #10
    To me, that looks like the corners are chamfered, and the edges rounded. Opposite of what you're saying?

    Importing a 3D model of that will not be the most efficient method.
    Aspire doesn't have an easy method of modeling a fillet or chamfer around the top and bottom edges.
    But as we've been saying, you don't really need to model it.

    The attached Aspire preview was created by drawing a simple rectangle with rounded corners, and applying two toolpaths. No model required.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Gerry

    JointCAM

  11. #11
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    That answers my question just fine. With a few adjustments in my brain, my customer and a bank loan, I can be practicing in short order.

    Thanks for the input.
    Paul
    These words are my opinion, WYLION. Any resemblance to truth or fiction is accidental at best.
    "Truth lies dormant in our future history." ― Paul Lawrence LXVII
    "Confidence is ignorance. If you're feeling cocky, it's because there's something you don't know." ― Eoin Colfer, Artemis Fowl



  12. #12
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    And another version showing that chamfers and roundovers can both be placed on the same part.

    Chamfer.JPG
    Gary Campbell
    CNC Technology & Training

  13. #13
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    The more I read about Aspire, the more amazed I am.

    The biggest impediment to CNC routing is still the price, but a decade later (like computing in general) the hardware costs are still the same only you get 10 times as much for the price.
    Paul
    These words are my opinion, WYLION. Any resemblance to truth or fiction is accidental at best.
    "Truth lies dormant in our future history." ― Paul Lawrence LXVII
    "Confidence is ignorance. If you're feeling cocky, it's because there's something you don't know." ― Eoin Colfer, Artemis Fowl



  14. #14
    For something as simple as what I or Gary showed, you can easily hand code it or use free software.

    If you don't plan on using the relief modeling capabilities in Aspire, there are a lot of other, much cheaper options that will do the same thing.
    Gerry

    JointCAM

  15. #15
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    +1 to what Gerry says. FYI, there was no "modeling" done with my block screen clip above. It was a simple 2D toolpath previewed in VCarve Pro.
    Gary Campbell
    CNC Technology & Training

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