Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 46 to 56 of 56

Thread: Old Molding Planes and the Rehab Enthusiast

  1. #46
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    23,552
    Blog Entries
    1
    My current project brought something to the forefront recently.

    Most of the used hollows that have come my way have unevenly honed irons. Most likely caused from it being easier to sharpen the middle of the curve than it is the edge. What happens is the edges become sharp points that can dig into the work at the edges.

    My camera wasn't taken out to the shop the last few days so maybe some pictures later.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    23,552
    Blog Entries
    1
    Today allowed me time to make some images of the blade in a 3/4" hollow plane. First is the blade as it was at the start today:

    Needs Improvement.jpg

    This isn't as bad as it started out since some work has been done on it each time it has been used in the past. Notice on the right side the 'point' on the edge is sticking up and on the left the edge is barley even with the sole of the plane. Kind of hard to get a good image of this with my camera.

    After a bit of work with some slip stones it is better:

    Better.jpg

    It may be difficult to see the difference here, but here is what matters:

    Good Work.jpg

    A full shaving without leaving any tracks.

    It is kind of like cambering a regular plane iron only it needs to take a shaving all the way to the edge on a hollow plane.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    23,552
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Kees Heiden View Post
    On almost all my hollow and round planes and the rebates that I have rehabbed, the sole just behind the mouth is higher then just before the mouth. That makes the plane difficult to work with. I usually rehab the round plane first and straighten the sole, then use that plane to repair the corresponding hollow.
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Anderson NH View Post
    +1 Kees it's a great way to clean up one plane sole from another.
    In this post a hollow & round pair is cleaned up and uses the technique mentioned above. The hollow plane had a bit of a rough sole and was not a perfect match to the round plane.

    Whilst ruminating on deeper subjects it is often beneficial for me to engage in a simple shop task. So today time was spent on rehabilitating a hollow & round pair of planes. These planes are what would be considered a Harlequin pair, i.e. not from the same maker.

    When buying a set of hollows & rounds a Harlequin set is, supposedly, with pairs of planes being from the same maker but not all of the pairs being from the same maker. A double Harlequin set means that the planes paired by size may also be from different makers.

    This is one of my 'pairs' waiting to be cleaned and sharpened. First the round plane was checked and the blade cleaned up and sharpened. It was then used to clean up and shape the sole of the hollow:

    Round to Hollow.jpg

    This is a time to take off as little as is needed to get the soles to match. Too much and not only does the mouth become more open but the hollow becomes too deep to be effective.

    If one is going to acquire a set of hollows and rounds via the rehab route, it may be helpful to either purchase a radius gauge or to make one using a compass. They come in handy to check the radius of a blade:

    Radius Guides.jpg

    These are available at art and drafting supply stores.

    The hollow blade needed a bit of honing to cut evenly. Here are the planes after today's work:

    5:16 Hollow & Round.jpg

    These planes now make complimentary profiles even though they are clearly not mates from birth. The hollow is bedded at 60 and the round at 55. The hollow has the common profile with a stepped side and the round has a flat side. They are an odd couple but they can work together.

    jtk
    Last edited by Jim Koepke; 09-15-2019 at 7:03 PM. Reason: words added
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  4. #49
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    N Illinois
    Posts
    4,633
    Good work and results Jim.

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    5,781
    I guess my set of hollows and rounds is a bastard part double harlequin set. There may be some matches, but in no particular order. I recently used them to change the profile cut by a sash plane, from an ugly Ovolo that I would never need, to an Ogee that I did need. A 1/4" rabbet plane also had a job in this. The beech is a wonderful wood to work for molding planes, and I see why it was so greatly favored.

    I accumulated a lot of molding planes back when getting a small packet shipped from the UK was just a few bucks. I don't remember how much I paid for each of these planes, but am sure it was not over 15 bucks a piece. They took better care of the old ones in the UK, than they did here in the states. I never had time to rehab ones that needed a lot of work.

    These pictures were taken while in the process. I rarely remember to take pictures once I'm producing work. These were before the modified plane was completely ready. The iron profile was changed with combination CBN wheel, and diamond files, then honed on water stones.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Tom M King; 09-16-2019 at 3:10 PM.

  6. #51
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    23,552
    Blog Entries
    1
    I guess my set of hollows and rounds is a bastard part double harlequin set. There may be some matches, but in no particular order.
    To the best of my memory, three of my pairs are made be the same makers, though separate for each pair. In one of the pairs both planes have the same maker's name with some differences between the stamps. They were likely made years apart from each other.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  7. #52
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    29
    Thanks for this thread, Jim

    I picked up a couple of wood planes with the intention of rehabbing them.

  8. #53
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    23,552
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by harold schmonz View Post
    Thanks for this thread, Jim

    I picked up a couple of wood planes with the intention of rehabbing them.
    Can you post images of your planes before you get started?

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  9. #54
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
    Posts
    9,777
    Once that Kitchen Island Project is done, and out of the shop...I have this to get working..again..
    Sargent 3416, side view.JPG
    Sargent No. 3416 Jack plane
    Sargent 3416 end view.JPG
    Could use a bit of sprucing up...

  10. #55
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    29
    Here is a picture.

    planes.jpg

    Most of the wedges need replacing. The irons are all pitted, rusted and don't fit the profile or the bed very well. My goal is to just get them functional. It may be awhile. I just finished up making some floats and would eventually like to make my own.

  11. #56
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    23,552
    Blog Entries
    1
    Work was being done in the house today with a crew installing a walk-in tub for Candy.

    This gave me a good reason to get out of the way and into the shop to try tuning an old coffin plane. Coffin Planes are not molding planes but they do have similar problems and solutions.

    It is an Ohio Tools product that appears someone has tried unsuccessfully to get working in the past. The main problem is it tends to jam at the mouth:

    Clogged Mouth.jpg

    The first problem noticed was the toes on the wedge were too long making a crevice for shavings to catch:

    One Catch Point.jpg

    The foot of the wedge also would catch shavings and was trimmed while the toes were being corrected:

    Wedge Trimming.jpg

    This produced better results but shavings were still getting caught in the mouth. The front of the throat/mouth was a bit rough and shavings were also catching against it. A little work with a rasp helped. Also an application of paste wax helped the shavings slip through:

    Shavings Exiting Without Jamming.jpg

    The tool in the lower right corner of the image is a spring hook. It is not only handy for installing springs, it can get into tight places to clear shavings from a clogged mouth.

    It is better than it was but still needs a bit more adjustment.

    Getting the chip breaker, blade depth all working together is a bit tricky. The front of the mouth will likely need a bit more work. The chip breaker also may need some work to get the shavings to exit without becoming a tight roll that jams.

    It now goes back on the shelf for another day.

    Having become comfortable with and preferring metal planes has kept this project on the back burner for a few years now.

    jtk
    Last edited by Jim Koepke; 06-15-2021 at 6:25 PM.
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •