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Thread: Building Your Own And Improving Upon The Oneida Dust Sentry Bin Level Sensor

  1. #1
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    Post Building Your Own And Improving Upon The Oneida Dust Sentry Bin Level Sensor

    Splitting this topic off of the original thread found here: LINK I put together a quick info dump on how to build the same dust bin sensor Oneida sells for $148 for quite a bit less than that. After doing so others have chimed in and we have begun what will probably become an improved design with more features. I decided this topic needed its own thread so we can add future discussion as this deign and topic grows.

    First off, Oneidas design and parts list is as follows:


    1. Banner QS18VP6D Sensor (LINK)
    2. 12V LED Strobe (LINK)
    3. 12 DC Power Supply (LINK)


    This list was comprised from looking at Onieda's produt page (LINK) images and from information provided by those who own the Oneida Dust Bin Sensor. Thanks to Matthew Henderson we established that there was in fact nothing in the Oneida box and everything was wired up directly (LINK)

    It is also known that there are two versions of the sensor that can be used, the QS18VP6D (PNP) or the QS18VN6D (NPN). They are both the same except for how they will be wired up.

    For the PNP version (QS18VP6D):

    Oneida Dust Bin Sensor.JPG

    For the NPN version (QS18VN6D):

    Oneida Dust Bin Sensor NPN.jpg

    For the power supply a wall wart of at least 200mA is used. Pretty common, you probably have an old one laying around from a network/internet router or some other electronic do-hicky that no longer works. Just make sure its 12V DC.

    The strobe they are using is this one I believe: LINK, if you use anything different either drive it with a relay (one which the contact driving part draws 100mA or less) or make sure whatever it is you use draws less than about 120mA.

    All of the parts can be found on eBay. The strobe runs about $3.50, the power supply can be free if you have one or should be dirt cheap on eBay from China like this one: LINK. And the sensor (which ever one you go with) can be found on eBay for various prices. I was able to get mine for about $35, but I usually see them on there for around $45.

    I will continue to add more to this post as this project develops and Im sure others will as well.

    Currently there are ideas in the works about how to make the dust bin sensor automatically shut off the dust collector when the bin is full as well as powering the bin sensor from the dust collector power supply itself. It is also a good idea to check the original thread as a lot was discussed there regarding alternate designs and functionality. Im hoping we can move that info here as it unfolds.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 05-08-2020 at 12:51 PM. Reason: Replaced graphic
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    Creating the auto shut off feature is fairly easy using a contactor. I use one to make a remote for my 2hp DC. I have a run of the mill remote switch that plugs into a 120V plug. When I switch it on, it activates the contactor, and the electro-magnetic field created switches the 240 line on. They come in all different configurations. I am betting there is one that uses 12v DC to sense the on/off (the line to the strobe light) and a 240V line on the other sige of the contactor.
    Mike

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Chalmers View Post
    Creating the auto shut off feature is fairly easy using a contactor. I use one to make a remote for my 2hp DC. I have a run of the mill remote switch that plugs into a 120V plug. When I switch it on, it activates the contactor, and the electro-magnetic field created switches the 240 line on. They come in all different configurations. I am betting there is one that uses 12v DC to sense the on/off (the line to the strobe light) and a 240V line on the other sige of the contactor.
    That is certainly another option though Im not sure all of us will have dust collector power controllers wired that way. So far we have the option of utilzing the wireless remote to turn the unit on and off as well as a smart power supply/relay like the Tork TRP-24.
    If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Rivel View Post
    That is certainly another option though Im not sure all of us will have dust collector power controllers wired that way. So far we have the option of utilizing the wireless remote to turn the unit on and off as well as a smart power supply/relay like the Tork TRP-24.
    True, if your DC already has a remote and/or a magnetic switch, it won't work, however... If we are going to do the range of mods you are suggesting, cutting the existing remote and/or magnetic switch out of the circuit would be a small part of the mod.
    Mike

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Chalmers View Post
    True, if your DC already has a remote and/or a magnetic switch, it won't work, however... If we are going to do the range of mods you are suggesting, cutting the existing remote and/or magnetic switch out of the circuit would be a small part of the mod.
    Agreed. It might be difficult to come up with a one size fits all solution to the auto shutoff feature as there are so many different power setups for the many different dust collectors out there. All I can focus on is the Oneida V-3000 I have but Im sure over time if there is a desire from the community we could amass a collection of other styles and how to control them.
    If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!

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    Ben,

    Good idea to start the new thread. Not sure how to move my posts from there to here though. In the meantime, further to substituting for a wall wart to use 230v power, here is a power supply that seems to take 230v US/UK/EU, etc. just by choosing the plug cap style.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/AC100-240V-t...cePGAlVHiBpCWQ
    Last edited by Ken Andersen; 03-19-2016 at 7:35 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Andersen View Post
    Ben,

    Good idea to start the new thread. Not sure how to move my posts from there to here though. In the meantime, further to substituting for a wall wart to use 230v power, here is a power supply that seems to take 230v US/UK/EU, etc. just by choosing the plug cap style.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/AC100-240V-t...cePGAlVHiBpCWQ
    Sorry Ken, I dont think I was clear enough in my explanation as to why I dont think any of those types of power supplies will work. Our standard 110V outlet here in the US has three leads, one for Hot (110V) one for Neutral (the current return path) and one for ground. In the US if you have a 220V outlet for say a power tool, those are also three leads, two are Hot (110V) and one is ground. The style of power supplies you are finding are all designed to work with a Hot/Neutral/Ground power source of up to 240V to comply with other parts of the world where they can have say a Hot at 240V, a Neutral (for a current return path) and a ground. That is not the same thing as out power tool outlets. They are two 110V circuits and one ground with no neutral and therefore no current return path for the power supply types your looking at to use. None of those styles will work for these 3 pin 220V outlets we use for our power tools. Changing the head on the power supply would simple make it fit in the socket, its the source of power in the wall socket that would have to be changed to make it work.

    Now the next question you may come to is: can you get 110V AC from a 220V AC 3 pin outlet? Well, maybe, but its not considered safe. Give this thread a read: LINK
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Andersen View Post
    Ben,

    Good idea to start the new thread. Not sure how to move my posts from there to here though. In the meantime, further to substituting for a wall wart to use 230v power, here is a power supply that seems to take 230v US/UK/EU, etc. just by choosing the plug cap style.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/AC100-240V-t...cePGAlVHiBpCWQ
    Oh no, I just noticed youre in Canada. I apologize. The information I have been giving you regarding AC circuits might not have anything to do with how things are in your country. Sorry about that. I have no idea how they wire things where you live.
    If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Rivel View Post
    Oh no, I just noticed youre in Canada. I apologize. The information I have been giving you regarding AC circuits might not have anything to do with how things are in your country. Sorry about that. I have no idea how they wire things where you live.
    Ben,

    Wiring here is same as US, so no confusion there!

  10. #10
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    Ben,

    My apologies. Totally my confusion! Duh Your first attempt should have been enough to set me straight!

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Rivel View Post
    Sorry Ken, I dont think I was clear enough in my explanation as to why I dont think any of those types of power supplies will work. Our standard 110V outlet here in the US has three leads, one for Hot (110V) one for Neutral (the current return path) and one for ground. In the US if you have a 220V outlet for say a power tool, those are also three leads, two are Hot (110V) and one is ground. The style of power supplies you are finding are all designed to work with a Hot/Neutral/Ground power source of up to 240V to comply with other parts of the world where they can have say a Hot at 240V, a Neutral (for a current return path) and a ground. That is not the same thing as out power tool outlets. They are two 110V circuits and one ground with no neutral and therefore no current return path for the power supply types your looking at to use. None of those styles will work for these 3 pin 220V outlets we use for our power tools. Changing the head on the power supply would simple make it fit in the socket, its the source of power in the wall socket that would have to be changed to make it work.

    Now the next question you may come to is: can you get 110V AC from a 220V AC 3 pin outlet? Well, maybe, but its not considered safe. Give this thread a read: LINK

  11. #11
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    Here's a pic of the Oneida remote receiver RG7 circuit board and schematic wiring diagram on the box. Following that is a sketch of how this is wired to the
    magnetic starter; the last sketch reproduces the readable text on the circuit board components. Can any one tell from this if I can power my dust sensor/strobe
    from this? (Sorry, don't know how to delete the thumbnails!)

    IMG_0124.JPG

    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Ken Andersen; 03-20-2016 at 1:12 AM.

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    Ken can you post a clearer image of the drawing on the box? Also how did you get that box? When you bought your dust collector did they send you the RF receiver separately and you had to install it? When I bought mine last month they told me the RF receiver had to be ordered at the time of the dust collector so they could install it before it was shipped out. Also mine is inside of a black plastic box. Was yours too and you opened the box to get to the circuit board? Mine looks in this inside the power control box: LINK. How long ago did you purchase yours?Also

    Also, found this thread that has some good info for maybe helping to understand whats going on in their control box: LINK
    Last edited by Ben Rivel; 03-20-2016 at 2:22 AM.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Rivel View Post
    Ken can you post a clearer image of the drawing on the box? Also how did you get that box? When you bought your dust collector did they send you the RF receiver separately and you had to install it? When I bought mine last month they told me the RF receiver had to be ordered at the time of the dust collector so they could install it before it was shipped out. Also mine is inside of a black plastic box. Was yours too and you opened the box to get to the circuit board? Mine looks in this inside the power control box: LINK. How long ago did you purchase yours?Also

    Also, found this thread that has some good info for maybe helping to understand whats going on in their control box: LINK
    Ben,

    I bought my 2.5 hp Super Dust Gorilla in 2009 new and unused from an individual who closed his business before getting it set up. It came with the "bag gripper",
    but not the remote. I installed the gripper myself. At the time, Oneida told me they install the remote receiver in (all) their units, but to use it, you had to buy the transmitter, which I did. The receiver is contained in a small black plastic box which is placed inside the mag starter box.

    The receiver failed in 2012, so I ordered a replacement from Oneida. That's where the box with drawing on it came from. For the pic in my previous post, I took the cover off the failed one and took the circuit board out. Here's two more pics: one of the black box and the box the replacement came in, the second is from the paper work supplied to the original purchaser of the DC from Oneida. The latter may be helpful in connection with the last LINK you posted.

    IMG_0066.JPG IMG_0078.JPG

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Andersen View Post
    Ben,

    I bought my 2.5 hp Super Dust Gorilla in 2009 new and unused from an individual who closed his business before getting it set up. It came with the "bag gripper",
    but not the remote. I installed the gripper myself. At the time, Oneida told me they install the remote receiver in (all) their units, but to use it, you had to buy the transmitter, which I did. The receiver is contained in a small black plastic box which is placed inside the mag starter box.

    The receiver failed in 2012, so I ordered a replacement from Oneida. That's where the box with drawing on it came from. For the pic in my previous post, I took the cover off the failed one and took the circuit board out. Here's two more pics: one of the black box and the box the replacement came in, the second is from the paper work supplied to the original purchaser of the DC from Oneida. The latter may be helpful in connection with the last LINK you posted.

    IMG_0066.JPG IMG_0078.JPG
    Yea I wouldnt doubt that they just throw the RF receiver in the control box whether you buy it or not. If its anything like the dust bin sensor they are probably just buying dirt cheap components from china and up charging a fortune for them. I havent found the RF receiver board they are using but I did find the black plastic housing: LINK.

    I emailed Oneida asking for a wiring diagram for the motor, power control unit and RF receiver and they sent back the same document you posted, so it doesnt look like much has changed since your control box was made.
    If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!

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    I just purchased a new Banner QS18VP6D from ebay for $40. Although it shipped from China, it arrived in just 9 days. I believe it works because it does detect my hand. I'll know if it detects sawdust when I install it in the next few days.

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