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Thread: New Vermec Sphere Cutting Jig

  1. #1
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    New Vermec Sphere Cutting Jig

    As the pics show,2016-02-14 15.23.22.jpg2016-02-14 15.22.49.jpg I did indeed buy this very cool Sphere Turning Jig from the good folks at Vermec Engineering, the price was very reasonable thanks to a favorable exchange rate, and this tool is built like a tank. Really impressed.

    My question, I feel like I have just recently watched a video on making a hollow sphere with the wall thickness @ 1/8 in. The method shown (here is where the memory gets fuzzy) was to cut the completed sphere in 1/2 while still on the lathe so you end up with two exact pieces. These pieces were then remounted with a chuck via a small tenon left on the ends of both halves, then the Vermec Jig was used to cut the center out so that a bowl shape at 1/8th thickness remains. Once both sides are hollowed they are glued back together and prepared for piercing.

    Anyone have advice and hopefully a link to a video showing this process?

    As a side note, my hollowing skills with a small hollowing tool leave much to be desired. Improving my hollowing skills will come in time, now I'm on a mission to make this process that I've asked about here happen.

    Thanks,
    Tim

  2. #2
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    Nice rig and looks like a great looking first sphere. I recently fell into this sub-vortex and think it's a cool diversion from the regular bowl routine. Here's a link to a video I've watched a few times from Brian Mills. Not a Vermec but does give a decent overview on one way to make such pieces. http://www.you2repeat.com/watch/?v=2uh5CcsAIQg

  3. #3
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    Tim, I watched one recently. I THINK that's where I heard you could make a slightly elongated sphere with a little flat in the middle that would be removed with the parting tool to leave a perfect hollow sphere. I'll try to find the resource again.

    But a question, did you buy directly from Vermec or did you go through the US distributor? Do you have a contact name, email address, web site, or phone number? I went to order one then found they are out of stock right now. This turned out to be great since I've just found a larger lathe and the would need the largest model!

    JKJ

  4. #4
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    Thanks Dave, great video. Very informative. Thanks Tim
    Quote Originally Posted by David Delo View Post
    Nice rig and looks like a great looking first sphere. I recently fell into this sub-vortex and think it's a cool diversion from the regular bowl routine. Here's a link to a video I've watched a few times from Brian Mills. Not a Vermec but does give a decent overview on one way to make such pieces. http://www.you2repeat.com/watch/?v=2uh5CcsAIQg

  5. #5
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    Please do share any resources you come across. Here you go, their terrific folks to work with.

    Pls tell Nadine I gave you their contact info.

    Nadine
    Accounts Manager
    In Office: Monday, Tuesday,Thursday & Friday

    Vermec
    39 Dalton St
    Kippa-Ring QLD 4021
    Australia
    PH: 07 3284 3733
    FAX: 07 3284 2733
    www.vermec.com

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Boger View Post
    As the pics show,2016-02-14 15.23.22.jpg2016-02-14 15.22.49.jpg I did indeed buy this very cool Sphere Turning Jig from the good folks at Vermec Engineering, the price was very reasonable thanks to a favorable exchange rate, and this tool is built like a tank. Really impressed.

    My question, I feel like I have just recently watched a video on making a hollow sphere with the wall thickness @ 1/8 in. The method shown (here is where the memory gets fuzzy) was to cut the completed sphere in 1/2 while still on the lathe so you end up with two exact pieces. These pieces were then remounted with a chuck via a small tenon left on the ends of both halves, then the Vermec Jig was used to cut the center out so that a bowl shape at 1/8th thickness remains. Once both sides are hollowed they are glued back together and prepared for piercing.

    Anyone have advice and hopefully a link to a video showing this process?

    As a side note, my hollowing skills with a small hollowing tool leave much to be desired. Improving my hollowing skills will come in time, now I'm on a mission to make this process that I've asked about here happen.

    Thanks,
    Tim
    Tim the process I use is the other way round. You probably saw Guilio Marcolongo - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yoTsNwxD0uc

    Hollow a hemisphere using the Vermec Sphere Jig (VSJ).


    1. Start with a cylinder between centers and cut a tenon on both ends. The length of the cylinder will have to make an allowance for clearance behind the sphere on at least one end.
    2. Part in half, then mount one end in a chuck.
    3. Set up the VSJ & make sure the arm with the carbide cutter is aligned on the center line of the swing arm so that the vertical axis of the pivot mount passes through the CL of the cutter arm. This is most important for the hollowing, as the cutter will not trace a circular arc centered on the CL of the blank if you do not. You can fiddle (fudge) a little but the actual cutting section of the carbide cutter must be on CL.
    4. Now set the equator aligning pin to align with the end of the blank, clamp the base & start hollowing, but remember to make an allowance for a joining tenon.
    5. Repeat for the other half.
    6. Join both halves, glue them if you wish, and then align the VSJ's equator pin to the equator of the joined halves - again remember to allow for how you joined the two halves when you align the VSJ. You may have to offset slightly depending upon how you made allowance for the mortice / tenon.
    7. Set the VSJ so that the cutter arm is slightly rotated to the LHS of CL of the swing arm - this creates a little extra room between the sphere and the "neck" between the sphere & chuck. Form the outside of the sphere. It doesn't make that much difference to the outside profile if the offset is small.
    8. If the tenon is not glued make sure you only take light cuts.
    9. When satisfied part off the neck then mount the near complete sphere between cup centers to remove the remains of the neck then sand & finish.


    If you make a small mistake with the offset the hollow sphere will naturally rest with the thicker wall thickness down .
    Last edited by Geoff Whaling; 02-15-2016 at 7:25 AM.

  7. #7
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    If you make a small mistake with the offset the hollow sphere will naturally rest with the thicker wall thickness down
    Sounds like something to do on purpose to make a wobbly sphere. I don't have a sphere jig but this gives me some ideas. It would be fun to cut a slot in one and make a wooden coin bank, smash to open. I wonder if this would be a good way to do a threaded sphere box?

    Geoff, On first reading I like the sound of your technique. One question, in step 8, "If the tenon is not glued..." do you mean if the sphere halves are not glued? Also, I assume step 2 would include carefully facing the possibly rough parting cut to get a clean seam when joined.

    JKJ

  8. #8
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    Hey Geoff,

    Thanks for taking the time to lay it out for me, I really appreciate the help.

    My hands on time is all of an hour right now so some of your explanation will need to soak in before I'll really understand. I have watched to video you linked to, if there was one showing the process to hollow the interior it would be terrific ... I seem to learn quicker with visual aids.

    Sure do thank you all for the help thus far!!

    Tim


    Quote Originally Posted by Geoff Whaling View Post
    Tim the process I use is the other way round. You probably saw Guilio Marcolongo - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yoTsNwxD0uc

    Hollow a hemisphere using the Vermec Sphere Jig (VSJ).


    1. Start with a cylinder between centers and cut a tenon on both ends. The length of the cylinder will have to make an allowance for clearance behind the sphere on at least one end.
    2. Part in half, then mount one end in a chuck.
    3. Set up the VSJ & make sure the arm with the carbide cutter is aligned on the center line of the swing arm so that the vertical axis of the pivot mount passes through the CL of the cutter arm. This is most important for the hollowing, as the cutter will not trace a circular arc centered on the CL of the blank if you do not. You can fiddle (fudge) a little but the actual cutting section of the carbide cutter must be on CL.
    4. Now set the equator aligning pin to align with the end of the blank, clamp the base & start hollowing, but remember to make an allowance for a joining tenon.
    5. Repeat for the other half.
    6. Join both halves, glue them if you wish, and then align the VSJ's equator pin to the equator of the joined halves - again remember to allow for how you joined the two halves when you align the VSJ. You may have to offset slightly depending upon how you made allowance for the mortice / tenon.
    7. Set the VSJ so that the cutter arm is slightly rotated to the LHS of CL of the swing arm - this creates a little extra room between the sphere and the "neck" between the sphere & chuck. Form the outside of the sphere. It doesn't make that much difference to the outside profile if the offset is small.
    8. If the tenon is not glued make sure you only take light cuts.
    9. When satisfied part off the neck then mount the near complete sphere between cup centers to remove the remains of the neck then sand & finish.


    If you make a small mistake with the offset the hollow sphere will naturally rest with the thicker wall thickness down .

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    Sounds like something to do on purpose to make a wobbly sphere.

    One question, in step 8, "If the tenon is not glued..." do you mean if the sphere halves are not glued? Also, I assume step 2 would include carefully facing the possibly rough parting cut to get a clean seam when joined. JKJ
    John, Check out Siegfried Schreiber's work - Sensual Sculptures - http://www.siegfriedschreiber.de/en/...res/index.html

    Yes - in Step 8 I am talking about the mortice/tenon joint between the two hemispheres. If you are fancy you could use a hand chased threaded joint



    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Boger View Post
    Hey Geoff,

    Thanks for taking the time to lay it out for me, I really appreciate the help.

    My hands on time is all of an hour right now so some of your explanation will need to soak in before I'll really understand. I have watched to video you linked to, if there was one showing the process to hollow the interior it would be terrific ... I seem to learn quicker with visual aids.

    Sure do thank you all for the help thus far!!

    Tim
    Tim, Its hard to condense all the little tricks into a few words. Perhaps best I take a photo of the arm in the hollowing position and post it. I'm out of action as far as using the lathe at the moment as I have a nasty bout of vertigo it is a major PIA. So it will only be the setup.

    VSCJ - hollowing.jpg

    In Step 3 using the photo from Vermec's site the cutter arm needs to be rotated a few degrees clockwise so its in the position parallel to the two white lines I have added to the image.

    My Vermec Sphere Jig (VSJ) is the older version without the equator pin (the aligning pin through the pivot), so I have a few extra steps to align the jig. I know Guilio Marcolongo has done quite a few demos for Vermec but I don't know if there are any video's of him or any other turner hollowing with the VSJ.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Geoff Whaling; 02-15-2016 at 6:07 PM. Reason: typo's

  10. #10
    Tim,

    I was wondering how the product was shipped to you from Australia (e.g., carrier, length of time, import duties etc)?

    Thanks,

    Alan

  11. #11
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    Hey Alan,

    The shipper was UPS, 3-4 days (very impressive) ... apparently all charges were included in the sales price.

    Great tool, service and price!!

    Tim
    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Dick View Post
    Tim,

    I was wondering how the product was shipped to you from Australia (e.g., carrier, length of time, import duties etc)?

    Thanks,

    Alan

  12. #12
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    Pls tell Nadine I gave you their contact info.
    Thanks, I sent an email and she responded - said she was pleased you referred me.

    JKJ

  13. #13
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    I would expect you'll be as pleased as I with their products, prices and communication.

    If you have info about using the Sphere Jig for hollowing the spheres I'd appreciate it if you would share.

    Thanks,
    Tim
    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    Thanks, I sent an email and she responded - said she was pleased you referred me.

    JKJ

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Boger View Post
    I would expect you'll be as pleased as I with their products, prices and communication.

    If you have info about using the Sphere Jig for hollowing the spheres I'd appreciate it if you would share.

    Thanks,
    Tim
    I haven't yet found what I read or viewed a few days ago. That method had the basically the same steps but turned the outside first, then divided and hollowed. I do think the method Geoff outlined may be a little better since after gluing the halves back together I think the tailstock end of the sphere could be turned completely by the jig. The other method would have to leave the tenon so the second half could be held for hollowing. It could still probably be turned away but would require setting up the jig again.

    JKJ

  15. #15
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    I have asked the folks at Vermec if they could generate some instructions on the hollowing process, sounds like something may be in the works.

    Tim




    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    I haven't yet found what I read or viewed a few days ago. That method had the basically the same steps but turned the outside first, then divided and hollowed. I do think the method Geoff outlined may be a little better since after gluing the halves back together I think the tailstock end of the sphere could be turned completely by the jig. The other method would have to leave the tenon so the second half could be held for hollowing. It could still probably be turned away but would require setting up the jig again.

    JKJ

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