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Thread: Oklahoma Homestead 40x80x12

  1. #166
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    45,189
    'Glad to hear of the progress. It will really seem to be coming together more once you get that insulation in and start rockin'.

    That's a nice cabinet, Jeff. Looks very sturdy and well turned out. HFT does have some very worthy items. I did end up buying a tool cabinet from HD, however, as the Husky configuration was actually better arranged and less expensive than the equivalent from HFT. The latter isn't always the best price these days for some things, it seems...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  2. #167
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    'Glad to hear of the progress. It will really seem to be coming together more once you get that insulation in and start rockin'.

    That's a nice cabinet, Jeff. Looks very sturdy and well turned out. HFT does have some very worthy items. I did end up buying a tool cabinet from HD, however, as the Husky configuration was actually better arranged and less expensive than the equivalent from HFT. The latter isn't always the best price these days for some things, it seems...
    What model cabinet did you get? I honestly didn't look anywhere else for this. I was reading on some welding forums about the HF cabinet and went down to the local store to scope it out. I paid $285 out the door including a "inside track" membership they sold me, so it saved me $15 off the price. I needed something to put my new welder on, picked up an ESAB EMP215ic multi process machine.
    Last edited by Jefferey Scott; 03-06-2018 at 1:36 AM.
    Jeff

  3. #168
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    45,189
    I did not buy a welding cabinet...I don't do that kind of work. I was only saying that it's important to know that HFT's prices are not "always" lower on some things. I bought a Husky 46" "workbench" tool cabinet from HD. A sorta-comparable unit from HFT was more than $150 more at the time. Lowes couldn't even come close with their offerings.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #169
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I did not buy a welding cabinet...I don't do that kind of work. I was only saying that it's important to know that HFT's prices are not "always" lower on some things. I bought a Husky 46" "workbench" tool cabinet from HD. A sorta-comparable unit from HFT was more than $150 more at the time. Lowes couldn't even come close with their offerings.
    Oh sorry, I gotcha now! Lowe's is pretty high on there toolboxes and stuff. Agreed.
    Jeff

  5. #170
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    45,189
    Yea, I was just really surprised that the Husky cabinets (which are quite nice for the money) were less expensive than HFT's offerings, and not by pennies.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #171
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    black river falls wisconsin
    Posts
    719
    Use tool snobs have to be flexible. I have hf tool cabinet to hold my cnc computer and all the related stuff. But as to actual tools NOPE....

  7. #172
    Quote Originally Posted by eugene thomas View Post
    Use tool snobs have to be flexible. I have hf tool cabinet to hold my cnc computer and all the related stuff. But as to actual tools NOPE....

    I understand where you're coming from Eugene. I have some of their wrenches and they've been pretty good. Also a 2-ton engine crane, which has worked well, but they do make a lot of stuff that I would only buy if i were to need it for one time usage. I do think that on some products, they are getting better with the manufacturing, which is good for everyone.
    Jeff

  8. #173

    Video

    Below is a link to a video I shot last Saturday of the insulation process on the living quarters in the shop. We should finish the insulation this weekend and then move on to water supply plumbing. Let me know if you like the videos or would rather see pictures. I can do either.





    Jeff

  9. #174

    Another video

    Below is a link to another video I shot last Saturday of the insulation process on the living quarters in the shop.


    Jeff

  10. #175
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    45,189
    Videos are nice for folks who have high speed internet, but many SMC members live in areas where their Internet options are limited. So some photos are probably a good idea!

    Don't forget to caulk all your doubled studs, headers, corners, etc. on your outside walls before buttoning things up. You may need to use backer rod (foam) in larger gaps or a low expansion spray foam to fill those larger gaps. It's totally work eliminating as many sources of air infiltration as you can. Also pay attention to the area behind your outlets on the outside walls to insure you have things insulated well...those are always trouble spots.

    Curious why you used R13 instead of R15 in those walls?
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 03-13-2018 at 11:38 AM.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #176

    Insulation

    Hi Jim, I actually hadn't thought about R15, Lowe's had the R13 in stock and that's what I grabbed. You probably saw that the outer walls have R19 as they have the room to do so.

    Thanks for the insulation tips, I'll go back where needed and fortify.

    As far as the pictures vs video, you'd think I would have considered that. I'm leaving my 300 mbps internet in a few months for 25 mbps rural internet!!! At least I'll still get my high speed fix at work
    Jeff

  12. #177
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    45,189
    I missed the R19, but just for future reference, the current "replacement" for that is R21. Same space. Slightly higher R-value. Big-box home centers don't change their buying/stocking habits very quickly apparently.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  13. #178
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I missed the R19, but just for future reference, the current "replacement" for that is R21. Same space. Slightly higher R-value. Big-box home centers don't change their buying/stocking habits very quickly apparently.
    It seems that, living in Oklahoma, building technologies always get to us last. I always see new tech premiere on the coasts then take years to work it's way to the middle of the country
    Jeff

  14. #179
    Just a short update with a few pics. We got 3 dump truck loads of 3 inch crusher run for around the building delivered last week. $750 for all. I used the Massey and a box blade to spread it out which worked pretty well.

    IMG_20180316_065741_817.jpg

    IMG_20180316_065741_821.jpg



    Then this happened. You need to keep an eye on those wheel bolts now folks. Will be installing thread locker on all of them next week!

    693.jpg



    Also got our water meter in. Looks like they left me a 3 foot leader of 1 inch poly pipe to connect to.

    562.jpg



    Interior pex pipe runs are next on the agenda. Will take some pictures of that process and post next week. Thanks for following folks.
    Jeff

  15. #180

    Plumbing Begins

    We began preparing for and running Pex plumbing for the interior water supplies. This is the first time Iíve worked with pex and I like it. Itís bendable, but pretty stiff so there is a minimum bending radius that you have to adhere to, or use 90 degree connectors. The fewer the connectors, the better in my book, so Iím keeping that in mind while running the supplies. This will take a couple weekends to finish, and then on to out side water supply from the meter. 500′ of trench for the water service to the barn!



    Hereís the Pex Manifolds, hot on left and cold on the right. The blue tube on the right is clamped off to get the bend out of it. It connects to the bottom of the cold manifold and is the water supply into the building. I built them in wooden boxes because they really need to stay in the wall and I wanted to have easy access to them to turn off the individual valves and/or check for leaks, etc. Not something you want to bury in the wall. Note: the short length of red pex is just there to test the fit, I havenít lost my mind.

    20180325_130448.jpg




    Hereís the whole house shutoff valve and the 50 lb pressure regulator. The line into the building is 3/4″ and will stay that size to and from the water heater.

    20180325_130417.jpg



    Here are the supplies to the washing machine box. The bend radius around the corner of the wall was too tight, so we used 90ís here. Iím waiting to crimp all the bands on the lines until everything is in place and good, Then Iíll have a crimp party and weíll test the system for leaks.

    20180325_144635.jpg

    20180325_144623.jpg

    20180325_144705.jpg


    Finally we used cement backerboard and rocked the tub surround. Everywhere thereís backerboard, there will be 12◊12 tile.


    20180325_120616.jpg
    Jeff

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