Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 20

Thread: Glue / Acid brushes?

  1. #1

    Glue / Acid brushes?

    What's your best (read: least expensive) source for acid brushes? It seems like the second they're called 'glue' or 'woodworking' brushes, the price quadruples.

    Thanks!

    Joe

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    1,233
    I have a bag of 'em from Harbor Freight. Not the best quality, but they work.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Stan Calow View Post
    I have a bag of 'em from Harbor Freight. Not the best quality, but they work.
    Double that, Harbor Freight. I cut the bristles down a bit, makes them easier to work with. Got that tip from another guy. Sometimes on sale for 1.99, but you can always use a 20%. I buy a pack almost every time I go to or order something from HF. Probably have 3/4 unopened packs in the drawer at the moment.

    http://www.harborfreight.com/36-pc-1...hes-61880.html

  4. #4
    Don't need high Q, just don't want it leaving a bunch of bristles in the glue line, which is what's happening with these. Don't know where these came from, bought the house from a retired WW'er who left them behind. Maybe there was a reason he left them behind. Hmmm.....

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northwestern Connecticut
    Posts
    7,149
    I don't use enough brushes to care about the cost, I soak/ wash and reuse multiple times to extend life. The not so well made ones....and they aren't always cheap...shed like a cat in spring. I can't work with with that. Last batch I got from Amazon, real natural bristles, very well made ferrul, they do not shed so much and work quite well. Wood working stores are the last place I shop for these, markup seems particularly high.
    "A good miter set up is like yoga pants: it makes everyone's butts look good." Prashun Patel

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    houston tx
    Posts
    634
    I don't think your going to find one of a quality that it doesn't shed bristles. I find the second time I use one its better because the bristles are glued in from the first time.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Quinn View Post
    I don't use enough brushes to care about the cost, I soak/ wash and reuse multiple times to extend life. The not so well made ones....and they aren't always cheap...shed like a cat in spring. I can't work with with that. Last batch I got from Amazon, real natural bristles, very well made ferrul, they do not shed so much and work quite well. Wood working stores are the last place I shop for these, markup seems particularly high.
    Honestly, at the cost, this has never crossed my mind. I use and pitch. I may have to try rinsing.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    N.E. Ohio
    Posts
    5,653
    I quit using them and switched over to using a silicone basting brush form the dollar store.
    I also picked one up from Rockler when it was on sale & I needed a small item to make freight.

    Use them - toss them aside and let the glue dry - pull off the dried glue (actually, kind of fun in a "packing bubble breaking" kind of way)
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northwestern Connecticut
    Posts
    7,149
    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Engelhardt View Post
    I quit using them and switched over to using a silicone basting brush form the dollar store.
    I also picked one up from Rockler when it was on sale & I needed a small item to make freight.

    Use them - toss them aside and let the glue dry - pull off the dried glue (actually, kind of fun in a "packing bubble breaking" kind of way)
    I got one of those silicone brushes from a woodcraft on a whim and I like it a great deal but find it doesn't offer the kind of precision I need to glue mortises in stain grade work, cope and stick doors, etc where squeeze out and clean up are the enemy. More useful to me for edge gluing operations in table and panel construction where liberal amounts of glue are required. Places I used to use chip brushes.
    "A good miter set up is like yoga pants: it makes everyone's butts look good." Prashun Patel

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    SF Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    15,300
    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Engelhardt View Post
    I quit using them and switched over to using a silicone basting brush form the dollar store.
    I also picked one up from Rockler when it was on sale & I needed a small item to make freight.

    Use them - toss them aside and let the glue dry - pull off the dried glue (actually, kind of fun in a "packing bubble breaking" kind of way)
    I picked up several of the silicone brushes from Rockler a year or so ago and I love them. Glue will not stick and like Rich said, it is kinda fun peeling it away.

    However, I tend to use one and then toss it in a cup of water and swish it around when I remember (and before the water evaporates) and that also cleans it up nicely. No more bristles pulling out of cheap brushes.
    Last edited by Chris Padilla; 11-09-2015 at 2:16 PM.
    Wood: a fickle medium....

    Did you know SMC is user supported? Please help.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    SF Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    15,300
    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Quinn View Post
    I got one of those silicone brushes from a woodcraft on a whim and I like it a great deal but find it doesn't offer the kind of precision I need to glue mortises in stain grade work, cope and stick doors, etc where squeeze out and clean up are the enemy. More useful to me for edge gluing operations in table and panel construction where liberal amounts of glue are required. Places I used to use chip brushes.
    There are smaller ones now available. I use them in place of the larger ones.
    Wood: a fickle medium....

    Did you know SMC is user supported? Please help.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Pleasant Grove, UT
    Posts
    1,503
    as others have said, Harbor Freight. I just make a point of ruffling the bristles to knock any loose ones out before getting the glue involved.
    It came to pass...
    "Curiosity is the ultimate power tool." - Roy Underhill
    The road IS the destination.

  13. #13
    I bought a bundle of 50 from Woodcraft many years ago. Best I can remember, it was less than $5. Still have over forty of them, as I wash them out after use. Have been known to use one for applying flux

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Orange County, CA
    Posts
    128
    I bought a bunch from Harbor Freight and they work OK.

    But then I bought one of those blue plastic glue brushes from Rockler. Then I bought two more. They are awesome. I don't use the acid brushes anymore unless I can't fit the Rockler brush in the area I'm gluing.

    Highly recommended.

  15. #15
    I don't use acid brushes, I recycle used our used toothbrushes through the shop for glue spreading. In between uses I drop them in a container of water so the brush part is in teh water. By the next day they are clean and ready to be used again. If One gets too beat up or dried out it goes in the trash. The work great for spreading glue.
    Lee Schierer
    USNA- '71
    Captain USN(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Please Contribute

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •