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Thread: Most secure mounting for End Grain hollow form?

  1. #16
    I may be missing this, but I didn't see anyone mention the CA glue comment. While I completely agree about not gluing end grain, the other half of the comment was about using CA glue. This would be like going from the frying pan to the fire. CA glue is brittle and not meant to take sharp blows. One good catch and you would have a missile coming off the lathe. I'm with John Keeton about chucking it, but the faceplate is a valid option as well.

  2. #17
    Brian, some may agree or disagree, but like John and others, all I have ever used is a tenon. Here's a couple I just turned, persimmon and sycamore, 8 1/2 tall x 6 3/4 wide, heavy wet and no steady rest, so yes I had to chip away very carefully. I lack the experience of others, but with your steady rest, I would say your in good shape. I have a Carter Multi Steady on the way. Don't think I would go any taller until the steady rest gets here. I got some vibration from these, so I'm working in correcting those issues. I will be using a faceplate for real large vases I plan to turn in the near future, but these small turning shouldn't be a problem for you, especially with a rest.
    I really liked your commission pieces and would love to turn one for our home as a decor piece. Good Luck with this! Don't loose your chuck key
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #18
    I used to use tenons all the time for hollow forms, but after trying Lyle's method I am a convert. Less vibration and faster. Only issue was lining up for the reverse turning as the mark from between center roughing is slightly off. Last hollow form turning was 7" wide by 12" deep. I did use a steady rest while working to be safe and steady.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Well Brian, there you have it. A variety of opinions and methods. All this should prove there are lots of ways to hold a hollow form in the lathe. Try all the popular methods and see which ones work for you. It's only wood.
    faust

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    Escondido, CA
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    Yes, and this tells me that several options are valid. I'll try several ways.
    Veni Vidi Vendi Vente! I came, I saw, I bought a large coffee!

  6. #21
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    Feb 2008
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    lufkin tx
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    I agree standard wood glues do not hold well on end grain nor green wood but thick CA holds very well and loves green wet wood. 5000#/ square inch according to the tables. I have glued numerous vases and urns well over 100#'s using a good glueblock screwed to a small faceplate(3"). Even tried some testing with a 2# hammer and it will not fail for me.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    Green Valley, Az.
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    Quote Originally Posted by robert baccus View Post
    I agree standard wood glues do not hold well on end grain nor green wood but thick CA holds very well and loves green wet wood. 5000#/ square inch according to the tables. I have glued numerous vases and urns well over 100#'s using a good glueblock screwed to a small faceplate(3"). Even tried some testing with a 2# hammer and it will not fail for me.
    Even stronger and more secure with a tenon and a forstner bit opening in the glue block. I use it often.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    lufkin tx
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    Not a bad idea old and wise one. I have never lost a big vase yet due to the glue job but who knows. I know all the technique must be spot on especially fresh glue. Oddly enough CA needs no pressure , like epoxy, to set well. On some really heavy(125#) pieces I have had to just set the glueblock(heavy non ring porous wood) on the upturned vase. A lot of thick CA is needed here. CA and epoxy share some advantages except their tolerance of moisture. CA is supposedly more brittle but I have never had that problem. even with a hammer. I have read here that you have used CA extensively while teaching turning.

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