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Thread: Poll - what angle do you have on your favorite bowl gouge?

  1. #1

    Poll - what angle do you have on your favorite bowl gouge?

    I am thinking about doing a little experimentation on bowl gouge angles. I thought I would ask some of you experienced turners what angle you have on the grind of your "go to" bowl gouge. [nose angle] and how far back do you sweep the wings?

    Also, could you explain why you like that angle best [basically, how does it help your cut?]

    Thanks everyone!
    Remember, in a moments time, everything can change!

    Vision - not just seeing what is, but seeing what can be!




  2. #2
    My bowl gouge has about a 60 degree bevel, give or take a few degrees. I don't get hung up on numbers too much.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Inver Grove Heights, MN
    Posts
    671
    I have two 1/2 inch bowl gouges. The one I use most is 60 degrees with fairly short wings. The other is 45 degrees with pretty long wings. As a former carver I have a tendency to grind smaller (more pointy) edges. I just recently reground the first gouge to the 60 degree angle. I thinkit is "stronger" and holds the edge a little better, but the lower angle cuts soft wood cleaner.

  4. #4
    I am surprised at only 2 responses to this question. Perhaps a lot of turners do not know what their gouge angle is, or have never thought about why they have the angle they do, or why it works well for them.
    Remember, in a moments time, everything can change!

    Vision - not just seeing what is, but seeing what can be!




  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Hanover, Ontario
    Posts
    404
    Two favorites, Roger
    Both are 1/2", a Thompson 55 degrees with about 1/2" wings, the other is a DWay and is a 55 degree bottom feeder.
    I sure like the new steel and the CBN 180 wheel.
    Grinding with the Wolverine jig and the Varigrind set as per Doug a Thompson directions for the swept back grind. The traditional grind is done on the platform and just rotated to get the straight across grind.
    Good luck with yours,
    Peter F.

  6. #6
    Thanks Peter!
    Remember, in a moments time, everything can change!

    Vision - not just seeing what is, but seeing what can be!




  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Green Valley, Az.
    Posts
    1,202
    I have several gouges. My most often used is a Hamlet 1/2 in 2060 ground at 45 deg. My 14 in and 3/8 in (all UK sizes) are also ground at 45 deg. My 5/8 Thompson gouge is ground at 55 deg. They all have a modified side grind

    I find that 45 deg is very user friendly for almost all cuts. I use my 1/4 in gouge a lot as a detail gouge.

    When the bowl gouge first came on the market in around 1980 they all came ground straight across and were ground at 45 deg. For several years that's the way everybody used them. I can remember in a Fine Woodworking article in about 1985 a picture of a fingernail grind. I, along with just about everybody else quickly changed to the more usable grind. A little later the Ellsworth side grind became popular.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Wally Dickerman View Post
    I have several gouges. My most often used is a Hamlet 1/2 in 2060 ground at 45 deg. My 14 in and 3/8 in (all UK sizes) are also ground at 45 deg. My 5/8 Thompson gouge is ground at 55 deg. They all have a modified side grind

    I find that 45 deg is very user friendly for almost all cuts. I use my 1/4 in gouge a lot as a detail gouge.

    When the bowl gouge first came on the market in around 1980 they all came ground straight across and were ground at 45 deg. For several years that's the way everybody used them. I can remember in a Fine Woodworking article in about 1985 a picture of a fingernail grind. I, along with just about everybody else quickly changed to the more usable grind. A little later the Ellsworth side grind became popular.
    Thank you Wally.......that is precisely the info I am looking for. I have just turned one of my 3/4" gouges [U flute] into a bottom feeder with a 60 degree bevel......most of my 5/8" and 1/2" gouges are at 47 degree with some sweep on the wings, but I have wondered if the 45 degree might be just a bit better, but I am only off by 2 degrees, and I am not sure any noticeable difference could be discerned.

    I also saw Stuart Batty as our featured demo at last years Virginia symposium advocate a 40/40 bevel [he does it free hand] and he says "float the bevel" and not "ride the bevel." I was also pondering the possible advantage of that 40 degree vs. the common 45 degree.

    Someone with your experience would likely be able to explain the benefit if there is any?
    Remember, in a moments time, everything can change!

    Vision - not just seeing what is, but seeing what can be!




  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Green Valley, Az.
    Posts
    1,202
    Roger, no, 2 deg makes no difference. There is no "best" grind. Gouge grinds are mainly a personal preference thing and depends on how you use the gouge. Handle high, low, pull cut, push cut, etc. ... Yes, Batty uses 40 deg. Last I heard Ellsworth and Jordan use 60 deg. Do some experimenting and find what works best for you.

  10. #10
    Well, for my favorite gouges, I use a 45/45 bevel and sweep. I found the 40/40 that Stuart uses to be too pointy for my tastes. These (I have them in several sizes) are best for the outside and down the inside walls. I use 60 and 70 degree bevels on my transition and BOB (bottom of bowl) gouges, and several variations of flute shapes from half circle to fluteless. I don't really have any use for swept back wings as I do all of my roughing and shear scraping with scrapers. 60 degree bevels are kind of a 'does every thing fairly well' type of tool. Some times the more specialized tools work better.

    robo hippy

  11. #11
    My two most used bowl gouges are about 45 deg bevel and swept back about as far as the tool diameter in a convex profile when viewed from the side. I have one that is 40 deg or a little less; it is swept back more than the tool diameter and a couple of bowl gouges with 65 deg or so bevel angles with "conventional" grinds (swept back much less than the tool diameter). I use the first two for roughing, shear scraping and most finish cuts; the others for special cuts.
    _______________________________________
    When failure is not an option
    Mediocre is assured.

  12. #12
    My angle is about 45. The precision of the angle doesn't matter much. I do like a swept back grind. I find it allows me a less 'nosey' approach down and through the inside of a bowl. This leads to a cleaner and smoother cut for me.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Hanover, Ontario
    Posts
    404
    Denis,
    A comment on your description of the sweep back shape, you said "a convex profile when viewed from the side".
    One of the professional turners, I think it was Lyle Jamison, that maintains the side profile of the sweep back should be flat, level from tip to end of sweep when viewed from the side.... He claimed that the convex profile is "easier to get a catch". So, I have always tried for a straight grind of the sweep back portion, and no catches, so I will keep doing that.
    Just food for thought and comments from other members for their experiences.
    thanks
    Peter F.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Kapolei Hawaii
    Posts
    2,940
    [QUOTE=Peter Fabricius;2448881]
    So, I have always tried for a straight grind of the sweep back portion, and no catches, so I will keep doing that.
    QUOTE]
    No catches? Wow. I seen Mike M get a catch.......

  15. #15
    I don't own a protractor or degree finder...so... My bowl gouges are all at the same angle and are not as pointy as a detail gouge, but not as blunt as a scraper grind or a bottom feeder gouge I use a lot.
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    No, it's not thin enough yet.
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