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Thread: What bit to make dutch or cove lap siding?

  1. #1
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    What bit to make dutch or cove lap siding?

    Pretty simple question for the residents experts here. What bit to make dutch or cove lap siding?

    http://www.buffalo-lumber.com/dutch-lap-siding.htm

  2. #2
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    What machine do you want to run it on (molder, shaper, router...?)

    Panel-raising bit would come close. I've run similar stuff on a shaper, but a molder would be my preferred machine.

  3. #3
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    For the number I have to do, I was thinking router table.

  4. #4
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    I'm thinking a cove panel raising cutter comes closest for the top cut.
    "A good miter set up is like yoga pants: it makes everyone's butts look good." Prashun Patel

  5. #5
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    I had to make something that look close to that & to get the long tongue on the cove I removed the bearing & ground off the post to get the tongue. Did it in a few passes on a router table.
    Last edited by Jay Jolliffe; 06-16-2015 at 6:53 AM.

  6. #6
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    My first three thoughts were:

    1) From MLCS, Part number #8681
    http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shops...ter_bits2.html

    2) From MLCS, Part number #8687
    http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shops...ter_bits1.html

    3) Use the tablesaw with a cove cutting jig.


    Keep in mind I am looking to do this on at least 192 linear feet of wood.

  7. #7
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    Factoring in waste you'd need over 200' so I wouldn't even consider a router table and a coving jig on the saw only allows for 1/8" or so at a pass so it'd take many, many passes to get there.

    Aren't there any millwork shops in NH that carry novelty siding?

  8. #8
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    I'd go with # 2 as long as your router table will take that big of bit....

  9. #9
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    There are but apparently there is a premium charge for running the in-house molding machine when compared to the cost of:

    (a) buying 4s and edging it myself

    (b) buying rough and planing and edging it myself

    (c) using the lumber I have milled myself and planing and edging it myself.

    I'm afraid my router won't like to run the horizontal panel bit as the motor is only 2 1/4 HP (Bosch 1617EVS). I have not used a vertical panel bit (#1), bit supposedly they need less HP because the diameter is not as large.

    Good catch that the tablesaw cove jig will only remove the height of the carbide (or less) per pass. To remove all of the material, would be 3 passes minimum (3/4" to 3/8")

    I have found these three options. Does anyone know of any others?

    Last edited by Anthony Whitesell; 06-16-2015 at 11:00 AM.

  10. #10
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    . . . . . .

  11. #11
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    If you can drive over to NY, Ghent Wood Products stocks Novely siding: http://ghentwoodproducts.com/price-l...ng-novelty.php

  12. #12
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    That would solve pricing #1 and #2. Near to me they are asking $0.75/lin ft for rough 1x8x8'. That price comes out to $0.85/lin ft plus gas.

    Still doesn't beat #3 and the more than 600 bdft of lumber that cost me less than $25 plus some sweat (ok, so a lot of sweat).

  13. #13
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    Capture.PNG

    The above knife should do the trick.............Rod.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod Sheridan View Post
    Capture.PNG

    The above knife should do the trick.............Rod.
    Sorry. No access to a shaper. Not to mention that one doesn't look quite right.

  15. #15
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    I just ran an 8' oak strip cutting a edge profile on a router table. Every place I paused to reset my grip there's a bump. This is not an issue with short stock, it is with long stock. I had one feather board, should have had at least two, one horizontal and one vertical. Maybe 4 feather boards - one vertical and one horizontal either side of the cutter. One piece wasn't too bad to sand out the bumps but close to 200 L.F.? You'd want a way to feed the entire length without pausing if possible. I think I understand why people usually have stock feeders on shapers.

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