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Thread: Close-Up and Personal Look at the NEW Lie-Nielsen PLOW PLANE

  1. #1

    Close-Up and Personal Look at the NEW Lie-Nielsen PLOW PLANE

    Here are a few pictures I took of the much-anticipated Lie Nielsen Plow Plane (Plough Plane) while at Handworks 2015 in Amana, Iowa.

    Apparently I can only put 8 pictures in a post, so I'll reply to my own post with four more.






    As you know, this tool is based on the Miller's Falls #43 (described here):
    http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan5.htm#num43

    Noteworthy outtakes from conversation with Lie Nielsen:

    1.
    The tool is apparently the first in a "family" of related planes. As you know, LN doesn't have a moving fillister plane, and the tool shown here (being a Miller's Falls #43 clone) is just a stone's throw from the Miller's Falls #41 (& 42, 44), which you may know as a quasi-combination rabbet/fillister/plow plane. The is difference is that the 41 features an accessory 'fillister bottom' that attaches to the arm' posts that hold the fence. The fillister bottom sits between the fence and the body, and holds a skew blade and nicker making suitable to cutting rabbets. One would presume it will be something like this:
    http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan5.htm#num41

    2.
    The handle shape will be improved/refined over what you see here. The wood handle pictured was 'simply borrowed from a LN backsaw. Look at their dovetail & carcass saw handles. You'll see what I mean.

    3.
    There is currently no ETA on this tool, nor is there an ETA on the moving fillister variant that should follow it. However, now that the Lie Nielsen honing guide is just days away from being dropped, presumably LN will be able to focus in earnest on this tool, which I understand is the next plane in the product pipeline.

    FYI:
    I put my name on the master list list of people to be notified once a list is started to let people know that we can begin signing up for early notification about any pre-order lists that are expected to be rumored. :-)
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Karl Fife; 05-30-2015 at 5:10 PM.

  2. #2
    As promised, here are four more shots of the tool:
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #3
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    I too had a chance to handle this plane at Handworks. I was impressed by the robustness of it, compared to other plow planes that I have experience with. I particularly like the depth adjustment and the way the spill is built into the cutter mechanism so that shavings are ejected away from the tool. This plow plane is the real deal. I'll just add this: "Lie-Nielsen...while were young?"

    Thanks for the very nice photos Karl!

  4. #4
    Thanks for posting these Karl. I'm sure your post is going to draw a lot of attention from those of us who couldn't manage to get to Amana.
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  5. #5
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    I particularly like the depth adjustment
    My eyes are missing something. How is the depth adjusted?

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

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    Loosen screw. Move cutter. Tighten screw.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    My eyes are missing something. How is the depth adjusted?

    jtk
    Look closely at the right hand side of the tool (starboard).

    IMG_20150516_105732 (Large).jpg

    You will see a 'sneck' on the blade (one side only) for tapping with a plane adjusting hammer. Groove cutting does not demand much in the way of precision, so this convenience is not strictly necessary, and affords more precision than is required. Even the original Miller's Falls #43 has NO adjusting sneck (on any example I've ever seen). If you can't identify the sneck, look for the little steel protuberance just below (and touching) the chip-deflector component.

    In the plow plane competition department, 'certain people' at the LV/Veritas booth in Amana were talking about future subtle modifications to the skate of the (already versatile) Veritas plow plane, to allow for even more accessory cutters, especially beading cutters and profile type cutters. Is that a compelling case for the Veritas Plow plane? It is certainly a cheaper way to cut beads and moldings than even the smallest, most humble stable of dedicated planes. I'm guessing it will come down to a person's space, funds and tolerance for time spent in tool setup and changeover.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Brady View Post
    Loosen screw. Move cutter. Tighten screw.
    Okay, the old fashioned way.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

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    I heard they also are soon to release Sasquatch and the Chupacabra.
    image.jpgimage.jpg

    Okay, but seriously- they haven't even worked out the handle yet? This thing was supposed to be released "early 2015." They don't even have the handle figured out? I'm not being cynical, but I'm feeling a bit misled at this point. I put off other purchases so I could have the $ the day this came out.

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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karl Fife View Post
    Look closely at the right hand side of the tool (starboard).

    IMG_20150516_105732 (Large).jpg

    You will see a 'sneck' on the blade (one side only) for tapping with a plane adjusting hammer. Groove cutting does not demand much in the way of precision, so this convenience is not strictly necessary, and affords more precision than is required. Even the original Miller's Falls #43 has NO adjusting sneck (on any example I've ever seen). If you can't identify the sneck, look for the little steel protuberance just below (and touching) the chip-deflector component. ...
    What prevents the blade from twisting when the sneck is tapped? Does the blade on on a T&G or against a stop?

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Last edited by Derek Cohen; 05-31-2015 at 9:17 AM.

  12. #12
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    do the blades have grooves like traditional plow blades? That would solve Derek's twisting question.

    I figure the delay is the extra time needed to re-jigger the entire display boards they use at shows, to accommodate a new, largish plane. We all know how projects like that get pushed to the bottom when something more exciting strikes your fancy. !

  13. #13
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    do the blades have grooves like traditional plow blades? That would solve Derek's twisting question.
    (Sound of smacking my own head!) of course (I'm sure they do), silly me.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

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    I dunno about this one. Lots of parts look cheaply designed and after thoughts. All this time and Lie-Nielsen still has to copy another design? Come on really? Stanley probably brought out planes at a faster rate without the help of computers and previous designs.

    I still don't know what the obsession is with those silly slotted screws but clearly innovation isn't in the LN dictionary.

    I'll have to wait (more) to see what the final version will be and of course the boutique price to go along with it but I'll reserve proper judgement until then.
    "If you have all your fingers, you can convert to Metric"

  15. #15
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    I still don't know what the obsession is with those silly slotted screws but clearly innovation isn't in the LN dictionary.
    Maybe they are just as obsessed with having slotted screws as you are with having them be something else.

    In a pinch there is almost always something in my pocket that can turn a slot head screw. When purchasing brass screws for my shop, I will go out of my way to find slot head screws.

    Almost every household in America has at least one screwdriver for slot head screws and if not, they likely have a butter knife that will do the job. Phillips drivers not only come in second, it is more dicey when it comes to all the different sizes and variances from metric to inch.

    If you want to convert the way things are done, you will have better luck with religion than you will with manufacturing.

    As to LN going with the Miller's patent design, it isn't my cup of tea. There is a reason the #45 came along and surpassed this design. The later 'combination' planes were much more versatile.

    jtk
    Last edited by Jim Koepke; 05-31-2015 at 12:27 PM. Reason: As to LN...
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

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